Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Thomas H. Taylor or search for Thomas H. Taylor in all documents.

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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
in operation a location was secured in Tennessee off the line of the Memphis branch of the Louisville and Nashville railroad, just south of the boundary line between Kentucky and Tennessee, and about eight miles from Guthrie, Ky. This recruiting station was named Camp Boone, and here was organized during the summer the nucleus of the famous brigade of infantry known during the war and still designated as the Orphan Brigade. Col. Phil. Lee, Maj. J. W. Hewett, Col. Robert A. Johnson, Gen. Thomas H. Taylor and Col. William Preston Johnston were among the most active in recruiting companies in Louisville. The first three became officers of the Second regiment, while the last two were made respectively the colonel and lieutenant-colonel of the First regiment, formed of the companies referred to as having gone to Virginia in April, of which regiment Captain Crossland became major. This regiment was the first of any organized body of Kentuckians to see active service, participating in th
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
ma, Col. D. R. Hundley; Fortieth Georgia, Col. A. Johnson; Fifty-second Georgia, Col. W. Boyd; Ninth Georgia battalion, Maj. T. J. Smith; Anderson's battery, Capt. J. W. Anderson. Fourth brigade, Col. A. W. Reynolds:—Twentieth Alabama, Col. I. W. Garrott; Thirty-sixth Georgia, Col. J. A. Glenn; Thirty-ninth Georgia, Col. J. T. McConnell; Forty-third Georgia, Col. S. Harris; Thirty-ninth North Carolina, Col. D. Coleman; Third Maryland battery, Capt. H. B. Latrobe. Fifth brigade, Col. Thos. H. Taylor:—Twenty-third Alabama, Col. F. K. Beck; Forty-sixth Alabama, Col. M. L. Woods; Third Tennessee, Col. J. C. Vaughn; Thirty-first Tennessee, Col. W. M. Bradford; Fifty-ninth Tennessee, Col. J. B. Cooke; Rhett artillery, Capt. W. H. Burroughs. Second division, brigadier-general Henry Heth. First brigade, Brig.-Gen. D. Leadbetter:—Forty-third Tennessee, Col. J. W. Gillespie, Thirty-fourth Georgia, Col. J. A. W. Johnson; Fifty-sixth Georgia, Col. E. P. Watkins; Forty-third Alabama, C<
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
tured on the 21st of July, and on the 26th General Morgan was forced to surrender with as many more, bringing the aggregate of his loss to more than half of his original command. The remainder made their way to the South in small detachments and were organized at Abingdon, Va. Of the imprisonment of General Morgan and his principal officers in the penitentiary at Columbus, Ohio, his romantic escape from therewith six of his faithful comrades, Hines, Hocher-smith, Sheldon, Bennett, McGee and Taylor, and of his subsequent movements and tragic death, September 4, 1864, at Greeneville, Tenn., reference must be made to the full and able history of Morgan's cavalry by his distinguished second in command, Gen. Basil W. Duke. The proper record of the bold enterprises and dashing exploits of this great cavalry leader would of themselves alone require more space than is accorded to this general narrative of the part taken in the war by all the Kentuck-ians who followed the Confederate banner.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
ly the organizations, with the names of their commanders and the dates of commissions, now for the first time published: First Regiment Kentucky infantry: Thomas H. Taylor, Colonel, October 14, 1861—Blanton Duncan, Lieutenant-Colonel, October 14, 1861—Thomas H. Taylor, Lieutenant-Colonel, July 3, 1861—Wm. Preston Johnston, LieuThomas H. Taylor, Lieutenant-Colonel, July 3, 1861—Wm. Preston Johnston, Lieutenant-Colonel, October 14, 1861—Edward Crossland, Lieutenant-Colonel, April 19, 1861—Benjamin Anderson, Major. Second Regiment Kentucky infantry: James M. Hawes, Colonel, July 17, 1861—Roger W. Hanson, Colonel, 1861—Robert A. Johnson, Lieutenant-Colonel, July 17, 1861—James W. Hewitt, Major, July 17, 1861—James W. Moss, Major,awes, Ben Hardin Helm, George B. Hodge, Claiborne F. Jackson (Missouri), Joseph H. Lewis, Samuel B. Maxey (Texas), H. B. Lyon, Randall L. Gibson (Louisiana), Thomas H. Taylor. The number of the rank and file in the Confederate army can only be estimated, but the total number of officers and men of all arms is compu
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
rations about Franklin and Murfreesboro, and the rear-guard fighting of Hood's retreat, until he was severely wounded at Richland creek, December 24th. In February, 1865, he was assigned to command of all Alabama cavalry within the limits of General Taylor's department. He was in the last fight at Selma, April 2d. After the close of the war he resumed the occupation of farming in Kentucky, and served again in the legislature of 1879. His death occurred June 9, 1884, at Danville, Illinois. igned in April. He then practiced law at Frankfort and at Louisville and was successively captain, major and lieutenant-colonel of Kentucky militia. In the Mexican war he served as colonel of the First Kentucky cavalry volunteers, and under General Taylor won distinction at the battle of Buena Vista, where he led the cavalry charge. The term of service of the regiment expired July 7, 1847. Colonel Marshall then returned to his farm in Kentucky. He declined several nominations, both State and