Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Taylor or search for Taylor in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
the wood of New Cold Harbor. This was the weakest point of the Federal line; for lying across the densest part of the forest, it was exposed to constant surprises, and could not be supported by artillery, as elsewhere. The brigades of Meade and Taylor of Slocum's division made a stubborn defence in this difficult position, but they were slowly driven back by the superior forces which attacked them. This advantage which the Confederates had gained in the centre exposed the angle of the wood atemy, however, constantly renews his attacks, and he turns from the line occupied by Hooker and Sedgwick, to direct his main efforts against McCall's right and Kearny's left, at the other extremity of the Federal positions. Kearny is supported by Taylor's brigade of Slocum's division, which had long been under his own command. The sight of their old chief infuses additional ardor into the four New Jersey regiments comprising it, and this timely reinforcement enables him to hold his position. B
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
tire army. The garrison of Washington consisted only of recruits and a very small number of trained troops, for the forty thousand men refused to McClellan had been given to Pope. Fortunately, Franklin's corps had landed on the afternoon of the 26th. It was positively destitute of everything that an army needs for its march, having neither horses, wagons, cannon, rations nor ammunition. Nevertheless, on the morning of the 27th, one of his brigades, composed of New Jersey troops under General Taylor, proceeded by rail as far as Bull Run Bridge, got off the cars, crossed the stream, and boldly advanced to see what they could discover in the direction of Manassas. The Confederates, seeing this handful of men—for they only numbered one thousand or twelve hundred—concealed themselves in the woods and the works; and when the Federals were within a very short distance, they opened a terrific fire upon them, which laid one-third of the party low; the remainder hastily fled to the other si
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Kentucky (search)
ndians of the other party, assembled near the Neosho. These Indians also consisted of three mounted regiments, under Colonel Taylor. They occupied, conjointly with a white company, the village of Gibson and a post called Creek Agency, on the Verdigder of his forces toward Gibson through Park Hill and Tah-le-Quah. The attack was fixed for the morning of July 24th. Taylor, having been apprised in time, tried to prevent it. On the 28th he sent three hundred and fifty mounted men to meet Forma principal column, which had had time to deploy, dismount and occupy a strong position along the edge of a wood. Just as Taylor's Indians were advancing in perfect security, they were received by a murderous fire; the Federals, uttering a savage yelandoned it and dispersed. This double combat had cost them one hundred and twenty-five men disabled. The dead bodies of Taylor and two Choctaw captains were found near Bayou Barnard. Philipps, crossing the Neosho, rejoined Forman, but was unable t
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
enants. But irritated and discouraged by this misfortune, he could no longer bear the criticisms, which he had not heeded until then, and which he finally read in the very silence of his humblest soldiers as well as his most zealous officers. He had determined to put an end to this state of things, and he requested the President to dismiss Generals Hooker, Brooks, Newton and Cochrane from the service of the United States, and to deprive Generals Franklin, Smith, Sturgis and Ferrero and Colonel Taylor of their respective commands. This would be to strike a crushing blow at those whom the army had learned to consider as its bravest and most experienced leaders. By signing such an order Mr. Lincoln would have disorganized the entire army. No serious cause for complaint was alleged against these officers to justify such punishment, except that they did not possess that confidence in their chief which cannot be enforced. Burnside deceived himself, moreover, by selecting these officer
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
ch. 1st Brigade, Graham; 2d Brigade, .....; 3d Brigade, Howe. 2d Division, Peck. 1st Brigade, Keim; 2d Brigade, Palmer; 3d Brigade, Naglee. 5th corps, Franklin; 19,405 men strong. 1st Division, Slocum. 1st Brigade, Newton; 2d Brigade, Taylor; 3d Brigade, Bartlett. 2d Division, Smith. 1st Brigade, Hancock; 2d Brigade, Brooks; 3d Brigade, Davidson. 6th corps, F. Porter; 19,960 men strong. 1st Division, Morrell. 1st Brigade, Martindale; 2d Brigade, Griffin; 3d Brigade, Butterst Division, Couch. 1st Brigade, ......; 2d Brigade, ......; 3d Brigade, Howe. 2d Division, Peck. 1st Brigade, ......; 2d Brigade, Palmer; 3d Brigade, Naglee. 5th corps, Franklin. 1st Division, Slocum. 1st Brigade, Newton; 2d Brigade, Taylor; 3d Brigade, Bartlett. 2d Division, Smith. 1st Brigade, Hancock; 2d Brigade, Brooks; 3d Brigade, Davidson. 6th corps, F. Porter. 1st Division, Morrell. 1st Brigade, Martindale; 2d Brigade, Butterfield; 3d Brigade, Griffin. 2d Divisi
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 9 (search)
ision, Howard. Sully's brigade; brigade, ......; brigade, ..... 9th corps, Wilcox. Division, Getty. Hawkins' brigade, Harland's brigade; brigade, ...... Division, Sturgis. Naglee's brigade, Ferrero's brigade; brigade, Division, Burns. Brigade, ......; brigade, .....; brigade, ...... Left Grand division, Major-general Franklin. 46,892 men, 116 guns. 1st corps, Reynolds. Division, Meade. Sinclair's brigade, Magilton's brigade, Jackson's brigade. Division, Gibbons. Taylor's brigade; brigade, ......; brigade,...... Division, Doubleday. Brigade, ......; brigade,......; brigade,...... 6th corps, W. F. Smith. Division, Newton. Brigade, ......; brigade, ......; brigade,...... Division, Brook. Brigade, ......; brigade, ......; brigade,...... Division, Howe. Vinton's brigade; brigade, .....; brigade...... Grand division of the centre, Major-general Hooker. 39,984 men, 100 guns. 5th corps, Butterfield. Division, Sykes. Brigade,.....; br