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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 66 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 48 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 42 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 30 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 16 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book. You can also browse the collection for Bayard Taylor or search for Bayard Taylor in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, VII (search)
Whittier, Longfellow, and Lowell; not that they would not have been conspicuous in any case, but that the moral attribute in their natures might have been far less marked. The great temporary fame of Mrs. Stowe was identified with the same influence. Hawthorne and Holmes were utterly untouched by the antislavery agitation, yet both yielded to the excitement of the war, and felt in some degree its glow. It elicited from Aldrich his noble Fredericksburg sonnet. Stedman, Stoddard, and Bayard Taylor wrote war songs, as did Julia Ward Howe conspicuously. Whitman's poem on the death of Lincoln is, in my judgment, one of the few among his compositions which will live. Wallace, who must be regarded as on the whole our most popular novelist—whatever may be thought of the quality of his work—won his first distinction in the Civil War. Cable, Lanier, Thompson, and other strong writers were also engaged in it, on the Confederate side. It is absolutely impossible to disentangle from the w
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XI (search)
hile out of any hundred critics ninety-nine would place the Day in June as the best of his shorter passages, and the Bigelow Papers, of course, stand collectively for his humor. Emerson's The Problem—containing the only verses by a living author hung up for contemplation in Westminster Abbey—still stands as the highwater mark of his genius, although possibly, so great is the advantage possessed by a shorter poem, it may be superseded at last by his Daughters of Time. No one doubts that Bayard Taylor will go down to fame, if at all, by his brief Legend of Balaklava, and Julia Ward Howe by her Battle Hymn of the Republic. It is, perhaps, characteristic of the even and well-distributed muse of Whittier that it is less easy to select his high-water mark; but perhaps My Playmate comes as near to it as anything. Bryant's Waterfowl is easily selected, and so is Longfellow's Wreck of the Hesperus, as conveying more sense of shaping imagination than any other, while Evangeline would, of
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XVII (search)
nterval, whatever that may be, which separates prose from poetry. Mr. Boyesen's third great American translator is Bayard Taylor. Here again he seems to me to concede too much to labor and not enough to genius. As a tour de force, Taylor's greTaylor's great work is doubtless monumental, and an honor to American scholarship. I remember with what regret I noticed that there was no copy of it, ten years ago, in the collection of Goethean literature in the Gothe-Haus at Frankfort, though Taylor's honoraTaylor's honorary diploma was there, and the custodian spoke of him with respect. As a translator of the whole work, and as a copious commentator and elucidator he is entitled to great credit, although his abundant notes are taken largely from German sources, easiny workman, yet it is in dealing with the oft-translated First Part that the higher poetic qualities come in; and in this Taylor has been easily surpassed, I should say, by the late Charles T. Brooks. And while Brooks, it is true, stopped short of t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XVIII (search)
d enumerated in the Cleveland catalogue. The actual works of the author himself are not included. The list is as follows:— Washington.48 Emerson, Lincoln (each)41 Franklin 37 Webster34 Longfellow33 Hawthorne25 Jefferson23 Grant22 Irving21 Clay19 Beecher, Poe, M. F. Ossoli (each)16 Theodore Parker, Lowell (each)15 John Adams, Sumner (each)14 Cooper, Greeley, Sheridan, Sherman (each)12 Everett11 John Brown, Channing, Farragut (each)10 Garrison, Hamilton, Prescott, Seward, Taylor (each) 9 Thoreau7 Bancroft6 Allston5 Edwards, Motley (each)5 This list certainly offers to the reader some surprises in its details, but it must impress every one, after serious study, as giving a demonstration of real intelligence and catholicity of taste in the nation whose literature it represents. When, for instance, we consider the vast number of log cabins or small farmhouses where the name of Lincoln is a household word, while that of Emerson is as unknown as that of Aeschy
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
encer, Herbert, 216. Spenser, Edmund, 18, 83, 94. Spofford, Harriet P., 102. Stackpole, J. L., 222. Stedman, E. C., 62, 67, 100. Sterling, John, 56, 94. Stevenson, R. L., 65. St. Nicholas magazine, riddles in, 23. Stockton, F. R., 219. Stoddard, R. H., 67. Stowe, H. B., 57, 58, 66, 68. Sumner, Charles, 70, 155. Sumner, W. G., 19. Swinburne, A. C., 68,158. T. Taine, H. A., 53. Taking ourselves seriously, on, 35. Talleyrand, C. M., 193. Tasso, Torquato, 187, 217. Taylor, Bayard, 67, 100. Taylor, Sir, Henry, 78, 167. Taylor, Thomas, 215. Temperament, an American, 2. Tennyson, Lord, 25, 29, 53, 56, 94, 95, 98, 124, 126, 184, 196, 203, 205. Test of the dime novel, the, 198. Thackeray, W. M., 93, 111. Thomas, Isaiah, 42. Thompson, Maurice, 67. Thoreau, H. D., VI., 9, 16, 73, 90, 114, 155, 175, 220. Ticknor, George, 19. Tocqueville, A. C. H. de, 32, 121. Tolstoi, Count, Leo, 35. Tonics, literary, 62. Touchstone quoted, 21. Tourgueneff, Iv