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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 66 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 48 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 42 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 30 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 16 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for Bayard Taylor or search for Bayard Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Poems (search)
on evil dreams, Looks back upon her wars, And the white light of Christ outstreams From the red disk of Mars, His fame who led the stormy van Of battle well may cease, But never that which crowns the man Whose victory was Peace. Mourn, Essex, on thy sea-blown shore Thy beautiful and brave, Whose failing hand the olive bore, Whose dying lips forgave! Let age lament the youthful chief, And tender eyes be dim; The tears are more of joy than grief That fall for one like him! 1878. Bayard Taylor. I ‘and where now, Bayard, will thy footsteps tend?’ My sister asked our guest one winter's day. Smiling he answered in the Friends' sweet way Common to both: “Wherever thou shalt send! What wouldst thou have me see for thee?” She laughed, Her dark eyes dancing in the wood-fire's glow: “Loffoden isles, the Kilpis, and the low, Unsetting sun on Finmark's fishing-craft.” ‘All these and more I soon shall see for thee!’ He answered cheerily: and he kept his pledge On Lapland
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Occasional Poems (search)
There needs no graven line to give The story of his blameless youth; All hearts shall throb intuitive, And nature guess the simple truth. The very meaning of his name Shall many a tender tribute win; The stranger own his sacred claim, And all the world shall be his kin. And there, as here, on main and isle, The dews of holy peace shall fall, The same sweet heavens above him smile, And God's dear love be over all! 1874. The golden Wedding of Longwood. Longwood, not far from Bayard Taylor's birthplace in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, was the home of my esteemed friends John and Hannah Cox, whose golden wedding was celebrated in 1874. with fifty years between you and your well-kept wedding vow, The Golden Age, old friends of mine, is not a fable now. And, sweet as has life's vintage been through all your pleasant past, Still, as at Cana's marriage-feast, the best wine is the last! Again before me, with your names, fair Chester's landscape comes, Its meadows, woods, and
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), The tent on the Beach (search)
The tent on the Beach It can scarcely be necessary to name as the two companions whom I reckoned with myself in this poetical picnic, Fields the lettered magnate, and Taylor the free cosmopolite. The long line of sandy beach which defines almost the whole of the New Hampshire sea-coast is especially marked near its southern extremity, by the salt-meadows of Hampton. The Hampton River winds through these meadows, and the reader may, if he choose, imagine my tent pitched near its mouth, wd and green Tangles of weltering weed through the white foam wreaths seen. “ Sing while we may,—another day May bring enough of sorrow; —thus Our Traveller in his own sweet lay, His Crimean camp-song, hints to us,” The reference is to Bayard Taylor's poem, The Song of the Camp. The lady said. “So let it be; Sing us a song,” exclaimed all three. She smiled: “I can but marvel at your choice To hear our poet's words through my poor borrowed voice.” Her window opens to the bay,
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
iding magistrate, ordered her to be imprisoned, with a lock kept on her leg at the pleasure of the Court. In such judicial action one can read the fear and vindictive spirit of the community at large. Note 6, page 249. The reference is to Bayard Taylor's poem, The Song of the Camp. Note 7, page 357. Mogg Megone, or Hegone, was a leader among the Saco Indians, in the bloody war of 1677. He attacked and captured the garrison at Black Point, October 12th of that year; and cut off, at the se Seeking of the Waterfall. At Eventide. Oriental Maxims. The Vision of Echard. William Francis Bartlett. Hymn of the Children. 1879The Khan's Devil. The Trailing Arbutus. The Dead Feast of the Kol Folk. Inscriptions. Our Autocrat. Bayard Taylor. The Emancipation Group. Garrison. The Landmarks. 1880My Trust. The Lost Occasion. Voyage of the Jettie. A Name. Tile King's Missive. St. Martin's Summer. Valuation. The Minister's Daughter. The Jubilee Singers. 1881Within the
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Index of Titles (search)
tresses, thou beautiful one, IV. 356. Stanzas for the Times, III. 35. Star of Bethlehem, The, II. 188. Stearns, George L., IV. 117. Storm on Lake Asquam, II. 84. Story of Ida, The, II. 336. Summer by the Lakeside, II. 27. Summer Pilgrimage, A, II. 86. Summons, A, III. 40. Summons, The, III. 213. Sumner, IV. 127. Sunset on the Bearcamp, II. 73. Swan Song of Parson Avery, The, i.188. Sweet Fern, II. 89. Sycamores, The, i. 178. Tauler, i. 141. Taylor, Bayard, IV. 140. Telling the Bees, i. 186. Tent on the Beach, The, IV. 227. Texas, III. 94. Thiers, IV. 135. Three Bells, The, i. 352. Thy Will be Done, III. 217. Tilden, Samuel J., IV. 155. To——. Lines written after a Summer Day's Excursion, IV. 67. To——, with a Copy of John Woolman's Journal, IV. 16. To a Cape Ann Schooner, IV. 155. To a Friend, IV. 23. To a Poetical Trio in the City of Gotham, IV. 396. To a Southern Statesman, III. 104 To Avis Keen