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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 81 3 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 67 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 67 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 37 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 7 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 30 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Dick Taylor or search for Dick Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
t an expedition up the Red River to co-operate with General Banks, who was expected at Alexandria with a large military force (he being under the impression that there were military stores at this point and that it was heavily fortified on the water side, or would be in a short time). There were also some other military movements under consideration to disconcert General Kirby Smith (Confederate), who had gone to Alexandria, so it was said, to provide troops with which to reinforce General Dick Taylor. Neither of these generals had any idea of operating below Alexandria, which was their natural base; for the gun-boats might get up that far very easily, but would find it a difficult matter to proceed further, as was proved in the end. The expedition sent by Farragut was composed of the wooden gun-boats Albatross, Estrella, Lieutenant-Commander A. P. Cooke, and Arizona, Volunteer-Lieutenant-Commander D. P. Upton, all under Lieutenant-Commander John E. Hart. It arrived off Fort d
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
sports, and that they could not well proceed without its aid. Before leaving Springfield, a letter, dropped by a Confederate scout, was picked up, informing General Dick Taylor that the transports had from six to ten thousand soldiers on board, and were accompanied by four gun-boats, this force being for the purpose of flanking him. This idea of the enemy stood the expedition in good stead, for, perhaps, had Taylor known there were only 1,800 effective soldiers, the transports would have been attacked sooner than they were. On the way up the river, the fleet had met with little opposition from the enemy, although parties of soldiers were frequently seh the windings of the river make the distance by water much greater. Ten miles back from Pleasant Hill Landing is Pleasant Hill, then occupied by the army of General Taylor, who, notwithstanding his vainglorious boasts of the operations of his cavalry, had not yet assembled a corporal's guard of horsemen, and very little artiller
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
ned the army exclusively in its retrograde movement to Grand Ecore. (!!) Banks might also have added-impelled in a great measure by the Confederates under General Taylor, who were pressing in his rear. It is astonishing how visionary some of the generals become after a war is over, and they want to delude the people into gially as our army advanced and gathered up the cotton, for which, in some way not explained, the Southerners were to be paid. Also that Generals A. J. Smith and Dick Taylor, not having been informed of this secret, and both being fightingmen, had entered the campaign to fight when it became necessary, and General Smith s capture of Fort De Russy, and Dick Taylor's forcing the fight at Sabine Cross Roads, had upset the calculations of the different somebodies. This report of a secret understanding was reiterated day after day until it was believed by many to be true; but many more of us were incredulous until we witnessed this strange shipment of cotton unde