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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 81 3 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 67 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 67 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 37 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 7 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 30 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Dick Taylor or search for Dick Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

ictory. The battle occurred on Bayou Bourbeau (Boggy creeks, 8 miles south of Opelousas, in southern Louisiana. Maj.-Gen. Dick Taylor, in his report, called it a brilliant feat of arms. The report of casualties happens to be accessible, showing having quite reached them, the battle of Mansfield was fought by the Texas and Louisiana troops under the command of Gen. Dick Taylor, the son of Old Rough-and-Ready President Taylor. From General Taylor's report it is learned that the following TPresident Taylor. From General Taylor's report it is learned that the following Texas forces were in the battle of Mansfield and that of Pleasant Hill, which took place on the next day: Maj.--Gen. John G. Walker's infantry division, including the three brigades of Gens. T. N. Waul, Wm. R. Scurry and Horace Randal; Gen. Tom Green'General Taylor's report it is learned that the following Texas forces were in the battle of Mansfield and that of Pleasant Hill, which took place on the next day: Maj.--Gen. John G. Walker's infantry division, including the three brigades of Gens. T. N. Waul, Wm. R. Scurry and Horace Randal; Gen. Tom Green's cavalry command, consisting of his old brigade under Colonel Bagby and General Major's brigade; Waller's battalion, Buchel's, Hardeman's, Terrell's, Debray's and McNeill's cavalry regiments (Gen. H. P. Bee had command ,of a part of this cavalry), B
Chickamauga he displayed such ability that he was appointed major-general, November 10, 1863. In 1864, on account of impaired health, he was granted leave of absence to visit his home in Texas. After crossing the Mississippi he repaired to Gen. Dick Taylor's headquarters. The gallant cavalry general, Tom Green, having been killed but a few days before, General Taylor immediately placed General Wharton in command, and he, with the cavalry, and Polignac, with infantry, harassed Banks on his retGeneral Taylor immediately placed General Wharton in command, and he, with the cavalry, and Polignac, with infantry, harassed Banks on his retreat to Alexandria, after his disastrous defeat in the Red river campaign. Wharton's career in the Trans-Mississippi was as creditable as it had been on the east side of the great river. On the 6th of April, 1865, in an unfortunate personal altercation, General Wharton was killed by General Baylor at Houston, Tex. Brigadier-General John W. Whitfield began his military career as colonel of the Twenty-seventh Texas cavalry, in 1861. Pea Ridge was the first considerable battle in which he was