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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 374 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 130 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 113 13 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 74 8 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 65 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 61 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 7 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 52 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 42 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Richard Taylor or search for Richard Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 13 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
n the construction of the foot bridge and the slow passage of his troops over the imperfect structure. When Winder's and Taylor's brigades had crossed, he would wait no longer, but moved forward towards the enemy; and when he found him ordered Windes. Winder attacked with vigor, but soon found the Federal position too strong to be carried by his brigade of 1,200 men. Taylor went to his assistance, but met with a stubborn resistance and varying success. Winder was forced back until other troopin Winder's brigade before its supports arrived, he had hurled this body of troops against more than twice their number. Taylor next attacked, but the repulse of Winder enabled the Federal commander to concentrate his forces against Taylor, and drivTaylor, and drive him from the battery he had taken. It was then that Jackson renewed the attack with the combined forces of three brigades, and speedily forced the enemy from the field. The Confederate trains had been moved in the course of the day across South r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Garland's report of the battle of seven Pines. (search)
In obedience to your orders for making the attack, I formed my brigade in the open field in front of our previous position on the left of the Williamsburg road in the following order, to wit: Fifth North Carolina, Colonel McRae--180 rank and file; Thirty-eighth Virginia, Colonel Edmonds--350 ditto; Twenty-third North Carolina, Colonel Christie--350 ditto; Twenty-fourth Virginia, Major Maury--450 ditto; Second Florida, Colonel Perry--435 ditto. The Second Mississippi battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor, 300 strong, were deployed as skirmishers along the edge of the woods in front of the brigade, with general orders to keep one hundred and fifty yards in advance. The foregoing estimate makes the total strength of the brigade on that day 2,065, exclusive of Captain Bondurant's battery, left subject to Major-General Hill's own orders — since, being compelled to advance by the main road on my extreme right, I could not superintend it. In the foregoing order, upon hearing the signal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hampton's report of the battle of Trevylian's depot and subsequent operations. (search)
ursued him until he took refuge behind strong fortifications and heavy infantry supports at Gordonsville (twelve miles distant from Trevylian's). We knew at the time that there were no fortifications and no infantry at Gordonsville, and that instead of Sheridan's driving Hampton in that direction he was himself driven in just the opposite direction. But the report of the chivalric Hampton settles all of those questions.] headquarters First division cavalry, July 9th, 1864. To Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor, Assistant Adjutant-General: Colonel — Having notified the General-Commanding, on the morning of the 8th June, that Sheridan, with a heavy force of cavalry and artillery, had crossed the Pamunkey, I was ordered to take one division in addition to my own and follow him. Supposing that he would strike at Gordonsville and Charlottesville, I moved rapidly with my division so as to interpose my command between him and the places named above, at the same time directing Major-General F
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Engagement at Sappony church-report of General Wade Hampton. (search)
Engagement at Sappony church-report of General Wade Hampton. headquarters Hampton's division, cavalry corps, A. N. V., July 10th, 1864. To Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor, Assistant Adjutant-General: Colonel — On the morning of 27th June the General-Commanding ordered me to move my command from Drewry's farm to Stony creek, in order to intercept Wilson, who was returning from Staunton river bridge to rejoin Grant's army. In obedience to these orders, I moved rapidly in the direction indicated with my division — Chambliss' brigade having been sent forward the evening previous. At 12 M. the next day I reached Stony Creek depot, where I found Chambliss. From this point scouts were sent out to find the position of the enemy and to ascertain what route he was pursuing. At 12.30 P. M. I wrote the General-Commanding, suggesting that a force of infantry and artillery be placed at Reams' station, as the enemy would have to cross the railroad there — Jarratt's or Hicksford. The scouts <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
ckson's Valley campaign, by Colonel William Allan; The battle of Fleetwood, by Major H. B. McClellan; The Black horse cavalry, by Colonel John Scott; The burning of Chambersburg, by General John McCausland; The campaign in Pennsylvania, by Colonel W. H. Taylar; The career of General A. P. Hill, by Hon. William E. Cameron; The Dalton-Atlanta operations, by General Joseph E. Johnston; The exchange of prisoners, by Judge Robert Ould; The last Confederate surrender, by Lieutenant-General R. Taylor; The Mistakes of Gettysburg, by General James Longstreet; The morale of General Lee's army, by Rev. J. William Jones, D. D.; Torpedo service in Charleston Harbor, by General Beauregard; Van Dorn, the hero of Mississippi, by Major-General D. H. Manry; Vicksburg during the siege, by Edward S. Gregory. The list of Federal contributions is as follows: Characteristics of the army, by H. V. Redfield; Death of General John H. Morgan, by H. V. Redfield; General Mea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
Destruction and reconstruction — personal Experiences af the late war. By Richard Taylor, Lieutenant-General in the Confederate Army. New York : D. Appleton & Co. e sma‘ hours of the morning. A competent military critic, who served under General Taylor the last year of the war, has promised us a full review of the book for our next number. We will, therefore, content ourselves with saying now that General Taylor's descriptions of the campaigns in which he served are very vivid and will beived during the battle were three regiments under Kirby Smith and Elzey. General Taylor's criticisms of men and measures are trenchant, sharp and decided, and ther ever produced, but one of the ablest commanders in all history. Some of General Taylor's pen portraits are very vivid, life-like and accurate. We have space for a wide sale. Since the above notice was penned a telegram announces that General Taylor died in New York on the 12th of April. In his death a gallant soldier, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some Corrections of Sherman's Memoirs. (search)
his time Hardee's only line of retreat was by Screven's Ferry to a causeway on the South Carolina bank; he was without pontoon bridge or other means of getting away, relying only on three very small steamboats; and the only troops he had on the Carolina bank were a small force of light artillery and Ferguson's brigade of Wheeler's cavalry, numbering not more than 1,000 men. At this time General Beauregard's Military division of the West embraced the department of Lieutenant-Generals Hood and Taylor, but not that of Lieutenant-General Hardee, although he had authority to bring the latter within his command, either at Hardee's request or at his own discretion in an emergency. He had arrived in Charleston, therefore, on December 7th, with a view of saving and concentrating the scattered Confederate forces in that region for some effective action against Sherman. He telegraphed Hardee (December 8th), advising him to hold Savannah as long as practicable, but under no circumstance to ris
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of General Richard Taylor. (search)
Sketch of General Richard Taylor. By General D. H. Maury. General Richard Taylor was only son of President Zachary Taylor. His father and mother were natives of Virginia, and his grand father, also a Virginian, commanded a brigade of Virginia troops in the battle of Brandywine. The hereditary residence of the family was in Orange county, Virginia. President Taylor's eldest daughter married Lieutenant Jefferson Davis, the late President of the Southern Confederacy; another daughter marrGeneral Richard Taylor was only son of President Zachary Taylor. His father and mother were natives of Virginia, and his grand father, also a Virginian, commanded a brigade of Virginia troops in the battle of Brandywine. The hereditary residence of the family was in Orange county, Virginia. President Taylor's eldest daughter married Lieutenant Jefferson Davis, the late President of the Southern Confederacy; another daughter married Surgeon Wood, of the United States army, and the other was Mrs. Bliss, now Mrs. Dandridge, of Winchester. When her father was President of the United States, it was Mrs. Bliss who gracefully extended the hospitalities of the President's house. Quite early in life General Dick Taylor took charge of his father's plantation in Mississippi, and soon afterwards moved to a fine estate in Louisiana, to the development of which he addressed himself until the war of 1861 called him to the field. H
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
the plan he conceived best adapted to serve the purpose. Mr. Davis continued his route westward, and his fate is known. General Breckinridge, after a careful study of the question, determined to attempt his escape to Cuba from the Florida coast. In company with Major James Wilson and his faithful black servant Thomas, he made his way to the mouth of the Saint John's river, having been joined on the route by Colonel John Taylor Wood, an officer of the Confederate navy, and grandson of President Taylor, and Captain 0. Toole. Here, after looking in vain for some friendly sail, and canvassing various plans for escape, they determined to attempt the voyage to Cuba in an open boat of eighteen tons burthen which they had secured. The expedient was desperate, but they felt that death was preferable to capture, and their preparations were soon made. It was impossible to procure any provisions for the trip, and the supply they had comprised enough for only a few meals; but the coast was a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations in Trans-Mississippi Department in June, 1863. (search)
Seddon, Secretary of War. 10th July, 1863. Returned to Secretary of War. The operations of General Taylor are highly commendable. J. D. Report of General R. Taylor. headquarters District Western Louisiana, Alexandria, June 11, 1863. Brigadier-General W. R. Boggs, Chief of Staff: General — I reached this place lal place twelve pieces in the command of that officer. I do not include the artillery of General Walker's division. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. Taylor, Major-General Commanding. The foregoing letter bears the following endorsements, to wit: headquarters Western Louisiana, Alexandria, June 11, 1863. Louisiana, Alexandria, June 11, 1863. Major-General R. Taylor, Informing as to his movements and dispositions of forces. Secretary of War. Special. This report contains a clear statement of the expedition against Milliken's bend, by General Taylor, which awakened so much hope and which is here shown to have been abortiv
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