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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 41 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 23 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. H. Taylor or search for W. H. Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's divisionYorktown and Williamsburg. (search)
on being on the Lee's mill road, which united with it behind the line which his skirmishers now held), was not rendered, and his efforts were therefore confined to holding his position, and keeping Longstreet from moving. Meanwhile, Longstreet, appreciating the situation, moved forward Wilcox's and A. P. Hill's brigades, with which he extended his right flank, to envelop Hooker's left and relieve his front. These brigades fell upon Hooker's left flank, composed of Patterson's and a part of Taylor's brigades, and after a sharp fight drove them, with heavy loss, out of a wood and across a considerable piece of ground, on which the trees had been felled but not lopped of their branches. Continuing to advance into this entanglement, the Confederate's were checked by a heavy fire from artillery and the remainder of Patterson's brigade with a portion of Grover's which Hooker withdrew from in front of Fort Magruder. Unable to see their enemy, the line was halted and the fire returned thro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
n assigned to General Kirby Smith's division, at Rappahannock station, where the Orange railroad crosses that river. With him were General Stuart and his cavalry. Elzey's brigade went into camp about a mile east of the railroad, and Trimble and Taylor were posted up the river to the west of it. Here from the 11th of March until the latter part of that month they were undisturbed by any turnout or approach of the enemy. Colonel Steuart left about the 15th for Richmond, where on the 18th he was also been assigned a cavalry brigade, was ahead, and about 1 o'clock we came in sight of the enemy's pickets. The sentinel on post, in a red shirt, was taking his ease at full length under a rail shelter. The group of horsemen, Generals Ewell, Taylor and Steuart, Colonel Johnson and others, who halted to reconnoitre, appeared somewhat to puzzle him. He looked, and looked again, as if he could not believe his eyes, at last, lazily getting up, he reached over for his musket, and all at once qui
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
closely checkered with heavy stone fences. Far to the left of us and off the Valley pike were the fortifications of the enemy vague and dim, and as yet undistinguishable as to size or shape. During the night, Jackson, with his old division and Taylor's Louisianians, had been pressing the retreating enemy down the Valley turnpike. General Ewell ordered Colonel Johnson to deploy as skirmishers on the left of the road, and of the Twenty-First North Carolina, Colonel Kirkland, to watch his left amany others, he found Hicks had betrayed the State, and he came to Virginia. No braver, or more gallant gentlemen than these have died for Southern Independance. With them fell six or eight more dead, Color-Sergeant Doyle was shot down, Color-Corporal Taylor caught the colors, but soon went down, the next Corporal to him caught them, but instantly falling, Corporal Shanks, Company H, seized them, lifting them arms length above his head, carried them safely through the fight. Colonel Johnso
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaigns of the civil war — ChancellorsvilleGettysburg. (search)
return, were detached, and left behind in Virginia, while Pettigrew's brigade of four regiments, two regiments that had been in West Virginia, and perhaps two other regiments in Davis' newly formed brigade, had been added to Lee's infantry. These infantry additions may be taken as off-setting the infantry detached, and therefore not affecting the question. Besides these changes there were added to Lee's army the two cavalry brigades of Jenkins and Imboden. Both the Count of Paris and Colonel Taylor, of General Lee's staff, estimate the strength of three cavalry brigades at 3,000 men. The Count and some other writers, have imagined, without a single fact on which to base the supposition, that the Confederate army was increased by the return of sick and deserters, and by the arrival of conscripts during the month of June, though it was engaged in an active campaign, and was moving from its own base into hostile territory. General Early clearly shows in the article above referred
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The PeninsulaMcClellan's campaign of 1862, by Alexander S. Webb. (search)
bb absurdly estimates Branch's and Anderson's brigades at 12,000 (p. 86). They actually numbered possibly as many as 5,500. (See Branch's order, Southern Historical papers, vol. VIII, page 103, which shows his strength did not exceed 3,000, and Taylor's Four Years with General Lee, page 50, where Anderson's strength is given at from 2,000 to 2,300 in the seven days battles.) Huger's brigades may have numbered 6,000 at this time. Thus the Confederates were able to concentrate about 65,000 men proach of his swift-footed assailant. Lee was now ready to deliver battle. His strength, including Jackson, was from 80,000 to 81,000 men. (See the careful computations of General Early, Southern Historical papers, vol. I, p. 421, and of Colonel Taylor, Four Years with General Lee, the latter of which General Webb adopts, p. 119). General McClellan's strength, omitting Dix's command at Fort Monroe, was by his official return for June 10, 105,825 present for duty. (This number General Webb
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes on Ewell's division in the campaign of 1862. (search)
While on the Rappahannock, in March and April, 1862, our division consisted of Taylor's (eighth brigade), Trimble's (seventh brigade), Elzey's (fourth brigade). These officers ranked — Elzey, Trimble, Taylor. The numbers of the brigades were those they had in the army of the Potomac while at Centreville. Our division was there escaped capture by the Yankees the day previous. At Winchester, Trimble's and Taylor's brigades of our division were engaged, Taylor charging a Yankee battery and TTaylor charging a Yankee battery and Trimble opening the fight and keeping it up for a full half-hour alone, when a thick fog came on, which lasted another half-hour and stopped all firing. When it clear, Colonel Isaac G. Seymour Sixth Louisiana (then in command of the brigade, General Taylor having been sick since Port Republic) was killed, so was Major C. R. Wheat nel Hays was made a Brigadier-General and assigned the brigade thus formed, and Taylor was made Major-General and sent to Louisiana. Lieutenant-Colonel Penn thus beca
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correspondence and orders concerning the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
ll be turned into depot. Only sufficient transportation will be retained for carrying the necessary cooking utensils, and such tents and tent-flies as are indispensable to the comfort and protection of the troops. By order of General Lee. W. H. Taylor, Assistant Adjutant-General. Richmond, Virginia, June 1, 1862. Hon. G. W. Randolph, Secretary of War: Sir,--I informed General Lee yesterday that Captain Lee, in command of naval forces at Drewry's Bluff, reported to me that the supportiGeneral suggests that you correspond with the officer in command in reference to any movement or cooperation which you think advisable, and which would not jeopardize the safety of that line. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. H. Taylor, Assistant Adjutant-General. Richmond, Virginia, June 1, 1862. Brigadier-General Walker, Petersburg, Virginia: If you have not left Petersburg, proceed at once with your entire force to Drewry's Bluff. Reply immediately, and state the n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Johnsonville. (search)
Mitchell, J. N.; Moore, F. A.; Morrison, J. B.; Moss, John; McDonald, J. L.; Moran, Wm., wounded at Price's X roads, but refused to leave his gun, killed at blockhouse near Baker's, on N. and C. railroad; Nepper, J. C.; Peel, Thos.; Priddy, M. C.; Prout, Josh; Prout, George; Powell, George; Reed, R. D.; Robinson, George; Sanders, Jas. L.; Scott, G. H.; Scott, J. M.; Siegel, Chas.; Smith, S. F.; Skeggs, Eugene; Southerland, Wm.; Stucker, Wm. G.; Summer, T. R.; Temple, C. R.; Thornton, A. R.; Taylor, J. G.; Wermesdoff, J.; Weaver, A. B.; Williams, Phil.; Woods, James C.; Wilson, W. W.; Wilson, T. J. Absentees in hospital and on furlough not reported. Non-commission officers, artificers and teamsters all took positions at the guns when a reduction of numbers required it. Rice's Battery. T. W. Rice, Captain, commanding. B. F. Haller, First Lieutenant. H. H. Briggs, Second Lieutenant, died of yellow fever in Memphis. D. C. Jones, Third Lieutenant. Dr. Jacob Huggins, Su
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Newport's News. Nomen non Locus. (search)
8th year of Charles I, at a Grand Assemblie holden at James Cittie, the 2d of March, 1642, 1643, there was passed an Act (being the 15th Act of that session) defining the boundaries of Warwick County. In that Act occurs the following passage: * * * from the mouth of Heth's Creek up along the lower side, * * * with all the lands belonging to the Mills, and so down to Newport's News, with the families of Skowen's damms and Persimmon Ponds. --[Hening's Statutes at Large, Edit. 1809.] Creed Taylor and William Munford, authorized examiners, certify at Richmond, Va., on the 1st September, 1809, that they have carefully compared the laws in Hening's volumes with the original manuscripts and find them to be correctly printed. They say that the terminating syllable teon, which is invariably written in the earlier part of the manuscripts con, is printed [in Hening] as it is now spelt tion. And they add that no other material variation from the ancient orthography has been observed. As
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9.91 (search)
. 22d South Carolina. 23d South Carolina. Holcombe (South Carolina) Legion. Boyce's S. C. Bat., (Macbeth Artillery.) Artillery of the right wing. Washington (La.) Artillery. Colonel J. B. Walton. Eshleman's 4th Company. Miller's 3d Company. Richardson's 2d Company. Squires's 1st Company. Lee's Battalion. Colonel S. D. Lee. Eubank's Virginia Battery. Grimes's Virginia Battery. Jordan's Va. Bat., (Bedford Artillery.) Parker's Virginia Battery. Rhett's South Carolina Battery. Taylor's Virginia Battery. Miscellaneous Batteries. Huger's Virginia Battery. Attached to Anderson's division, but not mentioned in the reports. Leake's Virginia Battery. Mentioned in the reports, but assignments not indicated. Maurin's Louisiana Battery, (Donaldsonville Artillery.) Mentioned in the reports, but assignments not indicated. Moorman's Virginia Battery. Attached to Anderson's division, but not mentioned in the reports. Rogers's Virginia Battery, (Loudoun Artillery.)