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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 476 2 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 164 8 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 160 20 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 131 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 114 6 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 102 2 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 59 3 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 45 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 33 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Zachary Taylor or search for Zachary Taylor in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
, etc., not with troops, should go towards Ringgold and Dalton, Georgia, beyond Taylor's ridge. All cooking should be done at the trains; rations, when cooked, will the spring of 1846, the Washington Artillery, under a requisition from General Zachary Taylor, volunteered with their battery—which had been increased by purchase to six six-pounder bronze guns—and proceeded to Corpus Christi, Texas, where Taylor's army was then encamped, remaining there in the service of the United States three y, acting as infantry, was Company A of the regiment, and served with it, under Taylor, until all the volunteers on the Rio Grande line were, by orders of Secretary Mtates of the American Union. On the admission of Texas into the Union, General Z. Taylor was ordered to the Rio Grande to protect our western frontier from the th You have heard how he was left without a command in Mexico; and yet General Zachary Taylor, the best judge of human nature I ever saw, said that Albert Sidney Joh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
join the attack wherever the enemy may be. V. Hill will cover our left flank from an advance of the enemy from the cove, and, by pressing the cavalry in his front, ascertain if the enemy is reinforcing at Lee and Gordon's mills, in which event he will attack them in flank. VI. Wheeler's cavalry will hold the gap in Pigeon mountain, and cover our rear and left and bring up the stragglers. VII. All teams, etc., not with troops, should go towards Ringgold and Dalton, Georgia, beyond Taylor's ridge. All cooking should be done at the trains; rations, when cooked, will be forwarded to the troops. VIII. The above movements will be executed with the utmost promptness and persistence. By command of General Bragg, George W. Brent, Assistant Adjutant-General. The resistance offered by the enemy's cavalry and the difficulties arising from the bad and narrow country roads, caused unexpected delays in the execution of these movements. Though the commander of the right colum
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
e crack corps of the State. Upon the breaking out of hostilities with Mexico, in the spring of 1846, the Washington Artillery, under a requisition from General Zachary Taylor, volunteered with their battery—which had been increased by purchase to six six-pounder bronze guns—and proceeded to Corpus Christi, Texas, where Taylor'sTaylor's army was then encamped, remaining there in the service of the United States three months, without incident. At the expiration of that time the battery returned to New Orleans and was mustered out of service. In May, 1846, another requisition was made upon the State of Louisiana, now for a brigade of four regiments of infantryrst to offer its services, and was the first in the field. The Washington Artillery, acting as infantry, was Company A of the regiment, and served with it, under Taylor, until all the volunteers on the Rio Grande line were, by orders of Secretary Marcy, sent home and discharged. From that period the company, in face of all adv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
on he repaired to his plantation in Brazoria county, Texas, and was made happy by the admission of Texas, in 1845, to a place as one of the independent and sovereign States of the American Union. On the admission of Texas into the Union, General Z. Taylor was ordered to the Rio Grande to protect our western frontier from the threatened invasion of the Mexicans. The Mexicans began the contest by an attack on Fort Brown, where Major Brown was killed. But the fort held out until succor came. sion, when he came to us it appeared to me that a great pillar had been put under the Confederacy; and when he fell on the field of Shiloh, that ruin stared before us. You have heard how he was left without a command in Mexico; and yet General Zachary Taylor, the best judge of human nature I ever saw, said that Albert Sidney Johnston had more sterling qualities than any officer he knew. I know not why it was; but I suppose that in those days, as in these, men were taken not so much for their
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
ade.—Boyce's South Carolina Battery (Macbeth Artillery)—(1). Attached to Anderson's Division, (Major Saunders, Chief of Artillery).—Huger's Battery; Moorman's; Grimes's—(3). There were also present, not assigned to special infantry commands: Washington Artillery, Colonel J: B. Walton.—Squire's (First Company); Richardson's (Second Company); Miller's (Third Company); Eshleman's (Fourth Company)—(4). Lee's Battalion, Colonel S. D. Lee.—Eubank's Battery; Jordan's; Parker's; Rhett's; Taylor's—(5). With the Cavalry under J. E. B. Stuart.—Pelham's Battery; Hart's (?)—(2). The following may have been present, but their assignments are not known to me: Leake's; Rogers' (Loudoun Artillery); Stribling's (Fauquier Artillery)—(3). There came up, after Second Manassas, from Richmond— Of the Reserve Artillery, five or six companies of Brown's First Virginia Regiment—Dance's (Powhatan Artillery); Hupp's (Salem Artillery); Macon's (Richmond
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. (search)
se under arrest. These amounted to over 16,000 men, and when deducted leave the present for duty about 125,000. General Humphreys reduces this number still farther by taking the present for duty equipped as the basis of his estimates, but as no such heading existed in the Confederate reports, the number of those present for duty is the only one that can be used in comparing the strength of the two armies. Lee held the upper line of the Rapidan with a force of 62,000 present for duty. (Colonel Taylor makes General Lee's force nearly 64,000.) Grant's purpose was to push rapidly through the tangled, wooded wilderness which covered Lee's right flank, and force him to fight in the more open country to the south of it by threatening his communications with Richmond. Lee anticipated his adversary, and leaving his cantonments on the Rapidan, hastened to strike the Federal army while on the march. The 5th and 6th of May were marked by bloody battles in the dense, wooded wilderness, and