hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 7 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Terrill or search for Terrill in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

the captains told her that if she would only go home with him, she would not be in any more war. She replied: No; I am a rebel, and I don't want to be with the Yankees. Our store was burned to the ground, and so was another one of our new houses. My two milch-cows were killed, and every one in the town; and for eight or ten miles around, all cattle and horses. Our horse was not at home. The printing-office and all the public buildings were burnt up, and Mr. Ragsdale's Hotel, Cullen's, Terrill's, and the Burton House. All the railroad is torn up, both up and down, for miles, and all the ties burned, and the iron bent and destroyed. Oh! such destruction! I do not believe that you or any one would know the place. There is not a fence in Meridian. I have not one rail left. Some of the ladies about town have but one bed left, and but one or two quilts. Mrs. McElroy (her son is colonel in the rebel army) has not one thing left, except what she and her daughter ran out of the