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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. E. B. Terrill or search for J. E. B. Terrill in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
ckson witnessed Walker's splendid courage and marked skill in the field; and one of the very strongest recommendations given during the war was Jackson's recommendation for Walker's promotion. He succeeded to the command of the old Stonewall brigade; was terribly wounded at Spotsylvania Court-house, but returned to take the command of Early's old division, which he gallantly led to Appomattox Court-house. He is now the able and honored Lieutenant-Governor of Virginia. Our Major was J. E. B. Terrill, a brilliant graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, whose gallantry and skill won for him the Brigadier's wreath and stars just as he yielded up his brave young life at. Bethesda church, in June, 1864. With such leaders, and the splendid material which composed our regiment, it soon become the pride of its officers and the glory of its humblest private soldier. It was my privilege, while at Harper's Ferry, to see occasionally Captain Turner Ashby, whose raven locks and soldi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
the First Maryland and five of the Thirteenth Virginia, and several companies of cavalry, captured Mason's, Munson's and Hall's hills, from which we could plainly see the dome of the Capitol at Washington. The day we captured Munson's hill, Major Terrill was sent with a detachment of the Thirteenth on a scout, during which we drove in the enemy's pickets, ate their smoking dinner, and pursued them back until they rallied on their reserve, and our gallant Major thought it would not be prudent to advance further. Accordingly we were moving back to our reserve when we met Stuart. What is the matter? I hope you are not running from the Yankees, said the gay cavalier. Major Terrill explained, and Stuart said, That was all right, but the Maryland boys are coming, and I think we must go back and beat up the quarters of those people. Just then a scout rode up and informed him that the enemy were fully five thousand strong and had five pieces of artillery. (We numbered about five hund
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
r's commissary. Gen. Trimble rose to the rank of Major-General, lost a leg at Gettysburg and gave most untiring service to the cause he came from Maryland to expouse. Gen. Elzey was also a Marylander who had won a fine reputation in the old army, who had been called by Beauregard at First Manassas, the Blucher of the day, who became also a Major-General, and who was recognized as an accomplished and gallant soldier. Besides there were then serving in the division, J. A. Walker, J. E. B. Terrill, Geo. H. Steuart, B. T. Johnson, Hays, York, J. M. Jones, Posey, Canty and others, who afterwards won the wreath and stars. While watching Banks, and awaiting Jackson's movements, we luxuriated in the green fields, the beautiful groves the clear streams, the magnificent scenery, and (what was, perhaps, even more appreciated), the delicious milk and elegant apple-butter of the glorious valley. But we had not long to wait. General Banks retreated down the valley, and took a strong
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of First Maryland regiment. (search)
enant-Colonel Johnson's suggestion that it would be agreeable to go along, he was ordered to report to him with Companies G and I. After marching through the woods for some miles, the force, consisting of four companies, Thirteenth Virginia, Major Terrill, and the above detachment of the First Maryland, came upon the flank and rear of a strong picket of the enemy on Munson's Hill; Colonel Stuart, with Major Terrill, charged directly on it, while Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson made a dash in the reMajor Terrill, charged directly on it, while Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson made a dash in the rear to cut off their retreat. But the Yankees were too fleet, and only some half a dozen prisoners rewarded the effort. Thence the two detachments marched by different routes on Upton's Hill, where a considerable body of the enemy were visable. When going through a thicket near the house, Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson suddenly came upon a scout of five, who mistook him for a Federal, one was captured, and the rest escaped. On reaching the house, it was found to have been just left; but the part