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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 131 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 79 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 66 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 57 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 50 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 32 8 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 23 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865. You can also browse the collection for Alfred H. Terry or search for Alfred H. Terry in all documents.

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or Milton. Late in the afternoon of the 9th Terry's division moved. The monitor Nantucket, gunb This news was received with rousing cheers by Terry's men and the sailors. At dawn Colonel Davis'ly sun. By that night all troops were ashore. Terry's division consisted of three brigades,—Davis'these roads over causeways formed the front of Terry's lines, and was commanded by our naval vesselris Island was attacked on the 10th; therefore Terry's diversion had been effective. Had Beauregarrig.-Gen. Johnson Hagood. Gillmore still kept Terry there, inviting attack, although the purpose oth pickets had also permitted the formation of Terry's division in line of battle. Hardly had the e the enemy retired. The expected attack on Terry's line by infantry did not take place, for aftr the enemy retired in some confusion. By General Terry's order, the Fifty-fourth was at once diregiment the casualties were very light. General Terry in his official report says:— I desire[4 more...]<
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Chapter 5: the greater assault on Wagner. (search)
from others within the battery of their previous knowledge of Colonel Shaw, he may at the distance of time at which he spoke have had his recollection of his interview with me confounded in other respects. You further ask if a request from General Terry for Colonel Shaw's body was refused the day after the battle. I answer distinctly, No. At the written request of General Gillmore, I, as commander of the battery, met General Vogdes (not Terry), on a flag of truce on the 22d. Upon this flagTerry), on a flag of truce on the 22d. Upon this flag an exchange of wounded prisoners was arranged, and Colonel Putnam's body was asked for and delivered. Colonel Shaw's body was not asked for then or at any other time to my knowledge. . . . No special order was ever issued by me, verbally or otherwise, in regard to the burial of Colonel Shaw or any other officer or man at Wagner. The only order was a verbal one to bury all the dead in trenches as speedily as possible, on account of the heat; and as far as I knew then, or have reason to believe
ina Volunteers, commanding, are hereby detailed for special duty in the trenches under the direction of Maj. T. B. Brooks, A. D. C. and Assistant Engineer. The whole of the available force of the regiment will be divided into four equal reliefs, which will relieve each other at intervals of eight hours each. The first relief will report to Major Brooks at the second parallel at 8 A. M. this day. No other details will be made from the regiment until further orders. By order of Brig.-Gen. A. H. Terry. Adrian Terry, Captain, and Assistant Adjutant-General. Major Brooks, in his journal of the siege under date of August 31, thus writes,— The Third United States Colored Troops, who have been on fatigue duty in the advance trenches since the 20th inst., were relieved to-day by the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteers (colored), it being desirable to have older troops for the important and hazardous duty required at this period. Throughout the whole siege the First New Yo
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Chapter 7: bombardment of Charleston. (search)
back to our lines, representing himself as a Rebel deserter. Taken to the post guard-house, he was recognized by some of his own company, whereupon he was tried and sentenced to death. General Stevenson commanded the division, by reason of General Terry's illness. After forming, the column moved slowly up the beach followed by a wagon, in which, seated upon his coffin, rode Lane. When the troops halted, the wagon passed along the line to the lower beach. There the coffin was unloaded, thesing of the stars and stripes on the high flag-staff erected. Captain Strahan, Third Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, was made commandant of the work. General Gillmore removed his headquarters from Folly Island to Hilton Head about this time. General Terry was given command of the Northern District from Charleston to St. Helena. Col. W. W. H. Davis, One Hundred and Fourth Pennsylvania, assumed control of Morris Island. His force was composed of one colored brigade and two white brigades, besi
that on the 18th he had forty-six hundred infantry (largely veterans), about six hundred cavalry, and three batteries of twelve guns. The enemy's knowledge of our force was accurate, and of our plans considerable, for despatches from Gillmore to Terry at Folly Island were intercepted and deciphered. Beauregard therefore stripped his garrisons elsewhere to meet us in Florida. A diversion made by General Schimmelfennig on John's Island, S. C., occurred too early, and another by Col. J. B. H had been appointed to the chief command of the armies. A combined movement of the Army of the Potomac and the Army of the James against Richmond was determined upon, and General Gillmore was ordered to join the latter army with the divisions of Terry, Turner, and Ames, of the Tenth Corps, as rapidly as they could be transported. General Hatch was to take command of the Department of the South. Aware of the impending stroke in Virginia and the withdrawal of our main force from Florida, by
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Chapter 13: operations about Pocotaligo. (search)
or nearly a year by Colonel Hallowell and Governor Andrew. He was one of the earliest if not the first colored officer mustered; and this decision, persistently solicited and finally granted, must rank high with the moral victories wrung from the general government by the regiment and its founders. On the 18th the steamer Wyoming landed the first supplies for Sherman's army at our wharf. That day news was received of the capture of Fort Fisher, North Carolina, by our old commander, Gen. A. H. Terry, causing great rejoicing. Our horses were returned from Hilton Head on the 19th. Rainy weather seriously interfered with bringing up supplies. Daily details from the Fifty-fourth were sent out repairing roads or to the wharf unloading stores. All the enlisted men and eight officers were employed on the 21st making a corduroy road from the landing. Innumerable wagons of Sherman's army came and went over the roads, carrying supplies from various landings on the Tullifinny and Pocota
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
ney Hill S. C. $50. Sulsey, Joseph Sergt. 21, sin.; dentist; Mt. Holly, N. Y. 1 Apl 63; 16 Je 65. ——; dis. Wounded 18 Jly 63 Ft Wagner. $50. New Haven, Conn. Terry, Marion 30, sin.; farmer; Detroit, Mich. 4 Apl 63; 20 Aug. 65. $50. Thomas Jeremiah Corpl. 18, sin.; waiter; London, Can. 4 Apl 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Thomas, 65. $50. Stewart, Jefferson B. 18, sin.; laborer; Brownsville, Mich. 26 Apl 63; 14 Apl 65 Gen. Hos. New York; dis. Wounded 30 Nov 64 Honey Hill, S. C. $50. Terry, Johnson L. Corpl. 22, mar.; barber; Reading, Pa. 19 Dec 63 20 Aug 65. $325. Timms, William H. H. 23, sin.; barber; Galesburg, Ill. 26 Apl 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. 21, sin.; drummer; Kalamazoo, Mich. 23 Apl 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Teale, Jefferson 31, sin.; farmer; Mercersburg, Pa 29 Apl 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Mercersburg, Pa. Terry, Stephen B. 24, sin.; seaman; Middleboro. 8 Sep. 63; died 21 Apl 65 Gen. Hos. Charleston, S. C. Small-pox. —— Thompson, Freeman 36, mar.; farmer; Hinsdale. 1
m, Thomas S., 158, 164, 237, 291, 308, 316. Brigaded with — Montgomery's, 46. Montgomery's, of Terry's Division, 53. Third, of Terry's Division, 106, 138. Fourth, of Terry's Division, 114. MontgomTerry's Division, 106, 138. Fourth, of Terry's Division, 114. Montgomery's, of Seymour's Division, 159. Third, of Ames' Division, 176. Hallowell's, of Provisional Division, 290. Briggs, Charles E., 196, 202, 209, 237, 251, 291, 317. Broad River, S. C., 237, 257, Terry's Division, 114. Montgomery's, of Seymour's Division, 159. Third, of Ames' Division, 176. Hallowell's, of Provisional Division, 290. Briggs, Charles E., 196, 202, 209, 237, 251, 291, 317. Broad River, S. C., 237, 257, 263. Brock, Hattie, prize steamer, 182. Brook gun, Battery, 207. Brooks, J. W., 15. Brooks, Thomas B., 117. Brown, Abraham F., 54. Brown, George, 56. Brown, Joseph E., 240. Brown, P. P.,oln, 96. Order of Truman Seymour, 156, 182. Order of Edwin M. Stanton, 2. Order of Alfred H. Terry, 117. Osborn, Francis A., 115. Otis, Mrs., Harrison Gray, 16. Otis, Theodore, 16. Ottessee Troops. Cavalry: Lewis' Brigade, 301. Tenth Corps, 129, 185. Terry, Adrian, 117. Terry, Alfred H., 52, 53, 55, 61, 62, 63, 101, 106, 114, 122, 143, 146, 157, 185, 268. Thanksgiving Day, 13