hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Calvin Terry or search for Calvin Terry in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 8 document sections:

re addressed to Gen. McClellan, one to the first Yankee who come, one to Abe Lincoln. One of those to Gen. McClellan reads as follows: General McClellan: You will be surprised to hear of our departure at this stage of the game, leaving you in possession of this worthless town; but the fact is, McClellan, we have other engagements to attend to, and we can't wait any longer. Our boys are getting sick of this damned place, and the hospital likewise; so, good-by for a little while. Adjutant Terry, C. S. A. M. The retreat of the rebels appears to have been precipitate. They commenced carrying all but their guns back to Williamsburgh four days ago. Wagons have been engaged in transporting their ammunition, provisions, and camp equipage for nearly a week past. Their sick and wounded, numbering over two thousand five hundred, were sent to Richmond ten days ago. The rebel council of war was held in Mrs. Nelson's house, at Yorktown, on Tuesday and Wednesday last. Jeff. Davis and
nstead of the wines of Andalusia, they consume almost unheard — of quantities of Bourbon and rifle-whisky. The yards of the rich are decorated with shrubbery, and what is far more in accordance with good taste, forest-trees are left standing and neatly trimmed — a custom which has been too sadly neglected in the North. There are several substantial brick and frame business-houses, all of which have been stripped and deserted. The names of firms were painted above the doors; they were, Terry & Duncan, Campbell & Dodds, J. T. Kemper, , and numerous others which it is unnecessary to designate. Mr. Kemper kept the Baltimore clothing Store, but neither he nor his clothing could be found. A druggist, whose name I have forgotten, determined to remain. Not enough of the Corinthians remained to welcome us, to give me any idea of what the mass of the citizens are like. A few poor persons, the druggist referred to, and the Mayor's clerk, and two or three wealthy females, were all th
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 69.-the massacre of the negroes in South-Carolina, June 13, 1862. (search)
ng is the official report concerning the massacre of negroes on Hutchinson Island by the rebels: U. S. Ship Dale, St. Helena sound, South-Carolina, June 13, 1862. sir: This morning, at four o'clock, it was reported to me that there was a large fire on Hutchinson Island. Shortly after a preconcerted signal that the enemy were in the vicinity had been made from the house of our pilot, I immediately started in the gig, accompanied by the tender Wild Cat, Boatswain Downs, Sen. Acting Midshipman Terry; first cutter, Acting Master Billings; second cutter, Acting Master Hawkins, and cutter, Coxswain Shatluff, up Horn or Big River Creek, in the direction of the fire. Soon after leaving the ship a canoe containing three negroes was met, who stated that the rebels, three hundred strong, were at Mrs. Mardis's plantation, killing all the negroes. As we advanced up the creek we were constantly met by canoes with two or three negroes in them, panic-stricken, and making their way to th
shattered as, in the opinion of his surgeons, to render amputation necessary. When our informant saw him he was being borne from the field on a litter to a hospital in the direction of Aldie, preparatory to the operation. Major Lawson Botts, of the Twenty-second Virginia, received a dangerous but, it is thought, not a mortal wound, from a Minie ball, which entered his face on the left side and emerged at the back of his head. The ball coursed around the bones without breaking them. Major Terry, of Wytheville, was shot through the arm, Captain Fulton through the neck, and Lieutenant Luke through the shoulder — all severe wounds. Capt. A. V. Scott, of the Twenty-third Virginia regiment, was badly shot in the arm. Colonel Neff, of the Thirty-third Virginia, was killed. The wounded have all been removed to hospitals established near Aldie, in the county of Loudoun. As our informants proceeded towards Aldie, on Friday morning, they heard tremendous cannonading in the direction
shattered as, in the opinion of his surgeons, to render amputation necessary. When our informant saw him he was being borne from the field on a litter to a hospital in the direction of Aldie, preparatory to the operation. Major Lawson Botts, of the Twenty-second Virginia, received a dangerous but, it is thought, not a mortal wound, from a Minie ball, which entered his face on the left side and emerged at the back of his head. The ball coursed around the bones without breaking them. Major Terry, of Wytheville, was shot through the arm, Captain Fulton through the neck, and Lieutenant Luke through the shoulder — all severe wounds. Capt. A. V. Scott, of the Twenty-third Virginia regiment, was badly shot in the arm. Colonel Neff, of the Thirty-third Virginia, was killed. The wounded have all been removed to hospitals established near Aldie, in the county of Loudoun. As our informants proceeded towards Aldie, on Friday morning, they heard tremendous cannonading in the direction
in pursuit. The Colonel accompanied the expedition in person. The company left at seven A. M., under command of Lieut. C. Terry, and overtook the enemy about twelve M., at Merriwether's Ferry, on the Obion River, thirty miles from Union City, while those on the opposite side of the river opened a cross-fire, which resulted in the death of three of our men--Lieuts. Calvin Terry and John Goodhart, and private Jacob F. Stone. Lieut. Terry was shot through the body, and only lived about an houLieut. Terry was shot through the body, and only lived about an hour. Lieut. Goodhart was shot through the head and through the heart, and died instantly. Private Stone was shot in the head, and killed instantly. The rebels were most severely punished; twenty were left dead on the field, and nine were taken prisoes and mules, and. some forty guns, fell into our hands. Capt. Fullerton is in full pursuit of the enemy. Killed — Calvin Terry, First Lieutenant, shot through the body; John Goodhart, Second Lieutenant, shot through the heart and head; Jacob F.
th in its execution and results — being no less than the meeting, routing and utter discomfiture, by an inferior force of infantry and two sections of artillery, of the dreaded General Forrest and his active brigade of cavalry. For some days, Gen. Forrest (brigadiered for his successful raid on Murfreesboro) has been hovering around Lebanon, Nashville, and Murfreesboro, awaiting the napping of another squad of Union generals, colonels, etc. His brigade consisted of Col. Lawton's, formerly Terry's Texan Rangers, whom Willich fought at Munfordsville; Colonel Smith's----Tennessee, Col. Horton's Second, and the First regiment of Georgia; an Alabama regiment, and a Kentucky squadron — all cavalry — all of whom were with him at the battle of the Little Pond, of which I write. Gen. Hascall's and Col. Wagner's brigades of Gen. Wood's division are encamped two miles from McMinnville, on the railroad to Manchester. On the morning of the thirtieth ultimo, it was learned that Forrest's briga<
nts within which our troops fought are situated about one mile from Woodsonville, opposite Munfordsville, on the south side of the river, and are built so as to protect the Green River railroad bridge. Immediately south of the works, and three hundred yards from them, a strip of woods crosses the railroad. A portion of this had been felled, and forms an abattis in front of the intrenchments. Beyond the woods is another open space, which was the scene of the battle between Col. Willich and Terry, in December last. To the right and left of the intrenchments are extensive open fields of undulating surface, extending on the left to Woodsonville and the turnpike road, by which the rebel approach was made. The garrison of the intrenchments on the morning of the attack consisted of the brigade of Col. Wilder, of the Seventeenth Indiana infantry, which was composed of the Seventeenth, Sixty-seventh, and Eighty-third regiments of Indiana troops, and company G of the Louisville Provost G