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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 25 1 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Luther Terry or search for Luther Terry in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
in that first moment. Yet she says of that Rome of 1843, A great gloom and silence hung over it. The houses were cold, and there were few conveniences; but Christmas found the Howes established in the Via San Niccolo da Tolentino, as comfortably as might be. Here they were joined by Louisa Ward, and here they soon gathered round them a delightful circle of friends. Most of the forestieri of Rome in those days were artists; among those who came often to the house were Thomas Crawford, Luther Terry, Freeman the painter and his wife, and Ttirmer, who painted a portrait of Julia. The winter passed like a dream. There were balls as gorgeous as those of London, with the beautiful Princess Torlonia in place of the Duchess of Sutherland; musical parties, at which Diva sang to the admiration of all. There were visits to the galleries, where George Combe was of the party, and where he and the Chevalier studied the heads of statues and busts from the point of view of phrenology, a theory i
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
on, very pleasant, and Hon. Charles Howard and son most amiable, with more breeding, I should say, than the Duke. Chev was the hero of this occasion; the Duchess always liked him. During this brief week, the Doctor had been in close communication with the Greeks of London, who one and all were eager to welcome him, and to bid him Godspeed on his errand. His business transacted, he felt that he must hurry on toward Greece. Some stay must be made in Rome, where our Aunt Louisa (now Mrs. Luther Terry) was anxiously expecting the party; but even this tie of affection and friendship could not keep the Doctor long from his quest. On May 1 he and Julia went to Greece, the others remaining for some weeks in Italy. Sixteen years had passed since our mother's last visit to Rome. She found some changes in the city, but more vital ones in herself. I left Rome, she says, after those days, with entire determination, but with infinite reluctance. America seemed the place of exile, Rom
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
Europe was undertaken solely for the pleasure of seeing her sister, always her first object in visiting Europe. The bond between them was very strong, spite of the wide difference of their natures and the dissimilarity of their interests. Mrs. Terry was now visiting her eldest daughter, Annie Crawford, married to Baron Eric von Rabe and living at Lesnian in German Poland. Baron Eric had served in the Franco-Prussian War with distinction, had been seriously wounded, and obliged to retire from active service. Here was an entirely new social atmosphere, the most conservative in Europe. Even before the travellers arrived, the shadow of formality had fallen upon them; for Mrs. Terry had written begging that they would arrive by first-class ! At that time the saying was, Only princes, Americans, and fools travel first-class, and our mother's rule had been to travel second. The journey was already a great expense, and the added cost seemed to her useless. Accordingly, she bought seco
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: a Roman winter--1878-1879; aet. 59-60 (search)
l part of the entertainment was going on. Madame Ristori made me repeat my part several times, insisting that my manner was too reserved and would make hers appear extravagant. I did my best to conform to her wishes, and the reading was duly applauded. Reminiscences, p. 425. Another performance was arranged in which Madame Ristori gave the sleep-walking scene from MacBETHeth. The question arose as to who should take the part of the attendant. Why not your sister? said Ristori to Mrs. Terry. No one could do it better In the spring, the travellers made a short tour in southern Italy. One memory of it is given in the following verses:-- Near Amalfi Hurry, hurry, little town, With thy labor up and down. Clang the forge and roll the wheels, Spring the shuttle, twirl the reels. Hunger comes. Every woman with her hand Shares the labor of the land; Every child the burthen bears, And the soil of labor wears. Hunger comes. In the shops of wine and oil For the scanty house of t
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
ver skilful in matters of money-making, this tour was undertaken with less preparation than the modern lecturer could well imagine. She corresponded with I Luther Terry, an American painter who had lived long in Rome, and had been a close friend of Thomas Crawford. He survived his wife by some years. one and another UnitariIt was nine years since she had had a house in Boston; in spite of her lameness, perhaps partly because of it, she enjoyed entertaining her family and friends. Mrs. Terry and her daughter spent part of the winter with them. The year 1880 was marked by the publication of her first book since Later Lyrics : a tiny volume entitlele intended as a birthday surprise. My sister is very little changed; always a most tender, sensitive woman. Sister Louisa dic Zzz me at 11 A. M. to bring my g Mr. Terry, Daisy, and Uncle mie appeared, Sister Louisa almost fainted with delight and astonishment. June 20, Oak Glen. Dear Flossy suffering at 6 A. M. -about all day
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
so brave a son could not have had one coward drop of blood in her veins — another little scrap, too, about the seven devils that Christianity can cast out. General Walker in the afternoon and the Harlands to dinner. They left London to join Mrs. Terry at Schwalbach, lingering for a little on the way in Holland and Belgium. July 27. The Hague. To see Mesdag and his pictures. Found Mesdag a hale man of perhaps fifty years--perhaps less; a fine house, and, besides his own paintings of whichd up until perhaps half-past 7. A very young Westphalian on board astonished us all by his powers of drinking and of smoking. He talked with me; said, Sie sind deutsch, which I denied. August 3. Reached Schwalbach at three. My dear sister [Mrs. Terry] came out to greet us. The meeting was a little tearful, but also cheerful. Much has passed and passed away in these eventful years . ... Presently Louisa and I were as though we had not been parted at all. She is little changed, and retains
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 (search)
later to Lord Cromer, Viceroy of Egypt. The Ladies Thynne were passing the winter with their cousin, the Countess of Kenmare, at her pleasant apartment in the Via Gregoriana. Among the guests one met at Lady Kenmare's was a dark, handsome Monsignore who spoke English like an Oxford Don, and looked like a Torquemada. Later he became Papal Secretary of State and Cardinal Merry del Val. May 2. Have worked as usual. A pleasant late drive. Dined with Eleutherio, Her brother-in-law, Luther Terry. Daisy Chanler, and Dr. Bull; whist afterwards; news of an engagement and victory for us off Manila. May 4.... We dined with Marchese and Marchesa de Viti de Marco at Palazzo Orsini. Their rooms are very fine, one hung with beautiful crimson damask. An author, Pascarello, was present, who has written comic poems in the Romanesque dialect, the principal one a mock narrative of the discovery of America by Columbus. Our host is a very intelligent man, much occupied with questions of po
F. M., II, 240. Crawford, Harold, II, 240. Crawford, Louisa W., I, 18, 19, 30, 34, 35, 58, 59, 70, 78, 79, 95, 103, 115, 118, 130, 134. Letters to, I, 81, 84, 88, 92, 110, 111, 113-17, 119-22, 125-29, 130, 131, 155-59, 168, 170-72, see also Terry, Louisa. Crawford, Thomas, I, 41, 95, 115; II, 55, 389. Crete, I, 260-62, 264, 275-77, 278, 287; II, 43, 44. 225, 394. Crimea, I, 294. Crimean War, II, 189. Critic, N. Y., II, 66. Crothers, S. McC., II, 320. Crusaders, II, 15. Taylor, Father, I, 72, 346. Tebbets, Mrs., II, 227. Tennyson, Alfred, Lord, I, 160; II, 203, 227, 247. Terry, Louisa, I, 267, 268, 352; II, 12-14, 16, 28, 29, 32, 55, 60, 65, 67, 172-75, 235, 236, 238, 256. Letter to, II, 94. Terry, Luther, I, 95; II, 28, 55, 67, 247, 254. Terry, Margaret,, see Chanler. Tewfik Pasha, II, 36. Thackeray, W. M., II, 306. Thaxter, Celia, II, 199. Thayer, Adele, II, 312. Thayer, W. R., II, 346. Theseum, I, 275. Thorndike, Mrs