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new triumphs await us in the cause of progress and civilization. Thus have we passed from infancy to childhood, from childhood to robust and buoyant youth, and from youth to vigorous manhood, and with an overgrowth so superabundant, we should neither be surprised nor alarmed that we have provoked foreign envy as well as unwilling admiration — that cankers of discontent are gnawing at our heart-strings, and that we are threatened with cheeks, and trials, and reverses. The continent of North America presents to the observing mind one great geographical system, every portion of which, under the present facilities for intercommunication, may be more accessible to every other than were the original States to each other at the time the confederacy was formed. It is destined at no distant day to become permanently the commercial centre, when France and England will pay tribute to New York, and the Rothschilds and the Barings will sell exchange on Wall street at a premium; and it require
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 95.-General Polk's General order. (search)
unes and the destruction of lives, for the subjugation of Christian freemen is out of the question. A war which has thus no motive except lust or hate, and no object except ruin and devastation, under the shallow pretence of the restoration of the Union, is surely a war against Heaven as well as a war against earth. Of all the absurdities ever enacted, of all the hypocrisies ever practised, an attempt to restore a union of minds, and hearts, and wills, like that which once existed in North America, by the ravages of fire and sword, is assuredly among the most prodigious. As sure as there is a righteous Ruler of the Universe, such a war must end in disaster to those by whom it was inaugurated, and by whom it is now prosecuted with circumstances of barbarity which, it is fondly believed, would never more disgrace the annals of a civilized people. Numbers may be against us, but the battle is not always to the strong. Justice will triumph, and an earnest of this triumph is already
Doc. 110.-a protest from South Carolina. A letter from L. W. Spratt. Hon. John Perkins, Delegate from Louisiana: From the abstract of the Constitution for the Provisional Government, published in the papers of this morning, it appears that the slave trade, except with the Slave States of North America, shall be prohibited. The Congress, therefore, not content with the laws of the late United States against it, which, it is to be presumed, were re-adopted, have unalterably fixed the subject by a provision of the Constitution. That provision, for reasons equally conclusive, will doubtless pass into the Constitution of the Permanent Government. The prohibition, therefore, will no longer be a question of policy, but will be a cardinal principle of the Southern Confederacy. It will not be a question for the several States, in view of any peculiarity in their circumstances and condition, but will be fixed by a paramount power, which nothing but another revolution can overtur
rate States was engaged in the formation of their Constitution, I find a protest from South Carolina against a decision of that Congress in relation to the slave-trede, in The Charleston Mercury of Feb. 13. It is written by L. W. Spratt, to the Hon. John Perkins, delegate from Louisiana. It begins in this way: From the abstract of the Constitution for the Provisional Government, published in the papers this morning, it appears that the slave-trade, except with the Slave States of North America, shall be prohibited. The Congress, therefore, not content with the laws of the late United States against it, which, it is to be presumed, were readopted, have unalterably fixed the subject, by a provision of the Constitution. He goes on and protests. We all know that that Constitution is made for the day, just for the time being, a mere tub thrown out to the whale, to amuse and entertain the public mind for a time. We know this to be so. But in making his argument, what does he s
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), A member of the Palmetto guard writes to the Charleston Mercury:--(no. 32) (search)
A member of the Palmetto guard writes to the Charleston Mercury:--(no. 32) Stone Bridge, Bull Run, July 23, 1861. Since writing you, we have had a terrible, though glorious fight — this makes the second. The fight commenced on the left flank of our line, and we in the centre (Cash's and Kershaw's regiments) received orders to march. When you were. in church, we were in the bloodiest fight recorded that has ever transpired in North America. The day was lost when our two regiments came up. Our troops were falling back, and had retired some distance. Col. Kershaw gave the command Forward! and after some ten or twelve rounds, away went the Yankees. I understand Beauregard said our regiments saved the day --a second battle of Waterloo. * * * * No regiment ever entered a battle under more depressing circumstances than we did. All along our line of march men were retreating, and saying to us, We are defeated. But we went forward, and the day was wo
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), The Richmond young men to those of New York. (search)
The Richmond young men to those of New York. young men's Christian Association Rooms, Richmond, Va., May 6, 1861. To the Young Men's Christian Associations of North America: brethren: We have determined by the help of God to address you in the character of peace-makers. In connection with the Confederacy of Christian Associations, we trust, that we have secured the confidence and love of many of your members, and we are conscious that we sincerely reciprocate their sentiments. You will then regard with some respect the statements we may make in reference to the present condition of our country. Many of those who participated with us in the Christian fellowship which was exhibited by the delegates from the various portions of our beloved country, at the annual conventions held in Troy, Charleston, Richmond, Cincinnati, and New Orleans, will doubtless be willing to unite with us in an earnest effort for the restoration of peace and good — will between the contending part
upon honor, that Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Weiss, of the above regiment, headed us in the assault on Fort Clark, near Camp Hatteras, on Wednesday, August 28th, between the hours of three and five o'clock in the afternoon; that he was the first one who entered, taking the secession flag from the rampart, and securing two six-pounders and five thirty-two pounders, during a very heavy fire between the enemy and our fleet for more than one hour and a half, in behalf of the United States of North America. We further testify that nobody except this body, respectfully signed, ever before us entered the above-named fort, and declare herewith, upon oath, that the flag which was taken personally by Lieut.-Col. F. Weiss is the true and right one which waved upon the fort, and was given them back by the United States Navy upon representation of this regiment, as a token of respect and acknowledgment for the important service so rendered. We further declare, upon oath if necessary, that if
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. battle of Port Royal, S. C. Fought November 7, 1861. (search)
s. Under God, we owe our preservation to Captain Ringgold and the officers of the Sabine, to whom we tender our heartfelt thanks for their untiring labors while we were in danger, and their unceasing kindness since we have been on board the frigate. This report is respectfully submitted. I am, Commodore, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. Geo. Reynolds, Commanding Battalion Marines. Flag-officer Samuel F. Dupont, Commanding U. S. Naval Expedition, southern coast U. S. North America. Report of Capt. Gilmore. The following is Capt. Gilmore's report of the first reconnaissance of Hilton Head: Official Document.--First Reconnoissance of Hilton Head Island, S. C., made on Friday, Nov. 7, 1861, by Capt. Q. A. Gilmore, Chief Engineer E. C., escorted by the Seventh Connecticut Regiment, Col. Terry. office of Chief Engineer, E. C., Hilton head, S. C., Nov. 8. Brig.-Gen. Wright, Commanding Forces on Hilton Head, S. C.: sir: In obedience to your directions of t
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
I am yours truly, H. W. Halleck. [private and confidential.] headquarters, Fifteenth Army Corps, camp on Big Black, Mississippi, September 17, 1863. H. W. Halleck, Commander-in-Chief, Washington, D. C. dear General: I have received your letter of August 29th, and with pleasure confide to you fully my thoughts on the important matters you suggest, with absolute confidence that you will use what is valuable, and reject the useless or superfluous. That part of the continent of North America known as Louisiana, Mississippi, and Arkansas, is in my judgment the key to the whole interior. The valley of the Mississippi is America, and, although railroads have changed the economy of intercommunication, yet the water-channels still mark the lines of fertile land, and afford cheap carriage to the heavy products of it. The inhabitants of the country on the Monongahela, the Illinois, the Minnesota, the Yellowstone, and Osage, are as directly concerned in the security of the Lower
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
nt of each other for local concerns, united under one Government for the management of common interests and the prevention of internal feuds. There was no limit to the possible extension of such a system. It had already comprehended half of North America, and it might, in the course of time, have folded the continent in its peaceful, beneficent embrace. We fondly dreamed that, in the lapse of ages, it would have been extended till half the Western hemisphere had realized the vision of univer cherished as a leading object of his policy, to acquire for France a colonial empire which should balance that of England. In pursuit of this policy, he fixed his eye on the ancient regal colony which Louis XIV. had founded in the heart of North America, and he tempted Spain by the paltry bribe of creating a kingdom of Etruria for a Bourbon prince, to give back to France the then boundless waste of the territory of Louisiana. The cession was made by the secret treaty of San Ildefonso of the
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