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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bimetallism, (search)
y system of the nations, met in Brussels in November, 1892, and separated without practical results. On March 17, 1896, a resolution was passed by the British House of Commons, urging upon the English government the necessity of securing by international agreement a solid monetary pay of exchange between gold and silver. In April, 1896, a Bimetallic Congress convened at Brussels, made up of representatives from the United States, Great Britain, France, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Denmark, Holland, Rumania, and Russia, and organized a permanent committee, under the belief that there could be an immediate agreement if the United States would re-establish bimetallism, if the Indian mints were reopened for the coinage of silver, if the Bank of England would turn into silver a part of its metallie reserve, and if the various European countries would absorb a sufficient amount of silver. The agitation of the silver question in the United States largely influenced the Presidentia
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burlingame, Anson, 1820- (search)
. Burlingame minister to Austria. He having spoken in favor of Hungarian independence, the Austrian government refused to receive him, and he was sent as ambassador to China. There he carried forward important negotiations; and when, in 1867, he announced to the Chinese government his intention of returning home, Prince Kung, the regent of the empire, offered to appoint him special ambassador to the United States and the great European powers, for the purpose of framing treaties of amity with those nations. This high honor Mr. Burlingame accepted; and at the head of a retinue of Chinese officials, he arrived in the United States in March, 1868. From his own country Mr. Burlingame proceeded on his mission to England, France, Denmark, Sweden. Holland, and Prussia. He was well received, and he negotiated treaties with all but France. He had just entered upon negotiations at St. Petersburg, early in 1870, when he died of pneumonia after an illness of only a few days, Feb. 23, 1870.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Centennial Exhibition, (search)
ound, and their annexes covered 26 acres more, making a total of 75 acres. The main building alone covered over 21 acres. The national government issued invitations to all foreign nations having diplomatic relations with the United States to participate in the exhibition by sending the products of their industries. There was a generous response, and thirty-three nations, besides the United States, were represented—namely, Argentine Republic, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chili, China, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Great Britain and Ireland, India and British colonies, Hawaiian Islands, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Liberia. Luxemburg Grand Duchy, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Orange Free State, Peru, Portugal, Russia, Santo Domingo, Spain and Spanish colonies, Siam, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunis, Turkey, and Venezuela. A Woman's executive committee was formed, composed of Philadelphians, who raised money sufficient among the women of the Union for the erection of a building for the ex
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Christian associations, young women's (search)
o develop women physically, by systematic training in the gymnasium and holiday outings; (2) socially, by receptions, helpful companionships, musical and literary entertainments, boarding clubs, employment bureaus, etc.; (3) intellectually, by reading-rooms and libraries, lecture courses, educational classes, concerts, art clubs, etc.; (4) spiritually, by Gospel meetings, evangelistic meetings, Bible trainingclasses and personal work. The World's Young Women's Christian Association was established in 1893 and holds biennial conventions. State associations, holding annual conventions, have been organized in twenty-one States. the Evangel is the official organ of the associations, and is published monthly at Chicago, Ill. In 1900 there were 1,340 associations in Great Britain, 400 in Germany, 270 in France, 400 in Denmark, with a smaller number in various other countries. In the United States there were 377 (connected with the International Committee), with a membership of 35,000.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Danish West Indies, (search)
anish West Indies, has an excellent harbor and large trade. The population of the island is about 14,000. St. John has an area of 42 square miles. The chief exports are cattle and bay-rum, and the population is about 1,000. Negotiations with Denmark for the cession of the islands to the United States began in 1898, after the close of the war with Spain; but owing to political changes in the Danish government, no definite results were then attained. In December, 1900, Congress became favoraf the islands to the United States began in 1898, after the close of the war with Spain; but owing to political changes in the Danish government, no definite results were then attained. In December, 1900, Congress became favorable to the bill of Senator Lodge, advising the purchase of the islands, and negotiations to that end were reopened. On Dec. 29, 1900, the United States minister to Denmark officially informed that government that the United States would pay $3,240,000 for the islands.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Democracy in New Netherland. (search)
ed to know whether there was no one among the Dutch in New Netherland sagacious and expert enough to draw up a remonstrance to the Director-General and his council, and severely reprimanded the new city government of New Amsterdam (New York) for seizing this dangerous opportunity for conspiring with the English [with whom Holland was then at war], who were ever hatching mischief, but never performing their promises, and who might to-morrow ally themselves with the North --meaning Sweden and Denmark. The convention was not to be intimidated by bluster. They informed Stuyvesant, by the mouth of Beeckman, that unless he answered their complaints, they would appeal to the States-General. At this the governor took fire, and, seizing his cane, ordered Beeckman to leave his presence. The plucky ambassador coolly folded his arms, and silently defied the magistrate. When Stuyvesant's anger had abated, he asked Beeckman's pardon for his rudeness. He was not so complaisant with the convent
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
xtraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Peking. Colombia. Charles Burdett Hart, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Bogota. Costa Rica. William L. Merry, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, San Jose. Denmark. Laurits S. Swenson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Copenhagen. Dominican republic. William F. Powell, Charge d'affaires, Port au Prince. Ecuador. Archbald J. Sampson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipot. Mr. Wu Ting-Fang, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Colombia. Sefior Dr. Luis Cuervo Marquez, Charge d'affaires. Costa Rica. Sefior Don Joaquin Bernardo Calvo, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Denmark. Mr. Constantin Brun, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. Dominican republic. Señor Don Emilio C. Joubert, Charge d'affaires. Ecuador. Senior Don Luis Felipe Carbo, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eaton, William, -1811 (search)
hrone, usurped by his brother. Soon afterwards Eaton returned to the United States, and passed the remainder of his life at Brimfield. For his services to American commerce the State of Massachusetts gave him 10,000 acres of land. The King of Denmark gave him a gold box in acknowledgment of his services to commerce in general and for the release of Danish captives at Tunis. Burr tried to enlist General Eaton in his conspiracy, and the latter testified against him on his trial. He died in B. Soon afterwards Eaton returned to the United States, and passed the remainder of his life at Brimfield. For his services to American commerce the State of Massachusetts gave him 10,000 acres of land. The King of Denmark gave him a gold box in acknowledgment of his services to commerce in general and for the release of Danish captives at Tunis. Burr tried to enlist General Eaton in his conspiracy, and the latter testified against him on his trial. He died in Brimfield, Mass., June 1, 1811.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Edward vii., Albert Edward, 1841- (search)
the United States, where he received an enthusiastic welcome. President Buchanan and his official family extended to him a grand entertainment at the national capital, and the cities which he visited vied with one another in paying him high honors. The courtesies so generously extended to him laid the foundation for the strong friendship which he always afterwards manifested for Americans. After this trip he travelled in Germany, Italy, and the Holy Land. In 1863 he married the Princess Alexandra, daughter of Christian IV., King of Denmark, and after his marriage he made prolonged tours in many foreign countries, most notably in Egypt and Greece in 1869, and in British India in 1875-76. He has always been exceedingly fond of out-door sports and athletics in general, and has kept himself in close touch with his people. On the death of Queen Victoria, Jan. 22, 1901, he succeeded to the throne, and was formally proclaimed king and emperor at St. James's Palace, London, on the 24th.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Evangelical Alliance, the, (search)
stant world. It has no central authority and appears in active operation only from time to time, as it meets in general conference. The character of these conferences are purely religious, lasting from ten to twelve days. The time is spent in prayer and praise, in discussions of the great religious questions of the day, and in brotherly communion. Nine international meetings have thus far been held. The first occurred in London, 1851; the second in Paris, 1855; the third in Berlin, 1857; the fourth in Geneva, 1861; the fifth in Amsterdam, 1867; the sixth in New York, 1873; the seventh in Basel, Switzerland, 1879; the eighth in Denmark, 1884; and the ninth in Italy, 1891. The United States branch held a national conference in Chicago, 1893, in connection with the Columbian World's Exposition. The week of prayer, beginning with the first Sunday in each year, and now generally observed throughout Protestant Christendom, is one of the most important results obtained by the Alliance.
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