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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 1,231 results in 515 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbott, Lyman, 1835- (search)
own and little-travelled ocean separated us from Europe. Under these circumstances to engage in European strifes, to aid France against Great Britain, to concern ourselves with the balance of power, to undertake, directly or indirectly, to promote tonly in our population, but in our suffrages. Whatever interests Norway and Sweden, Holland and Belgium, Germany, Italy, France, or England, interests our people, because from these countries respectively multitudes of our people have come. Meanwhi whole progress of Europe has been progress towards democracy-whether in England, Spain, Italy, Austria-Hungary, Germany, France, or Scandinavia. The difference in the history of these nationalities, during the nineteenth century, has been a differe chance for competition is offered us. The great amorphous, ill-organized empire of China is dropping to pieces; Germany, France, England, and Japan, are all seeking ports of entry through which to push, by commercial enterprises, the products of the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Acadia, or Acadie, (search)
Acadia, or Acadie, The ancient name of Nova Scotia (q. v.) and adjacent regions. It is supposed to have been visited by Sebastian Cabot in 1498, but the first attempt to plant a settlement there was by De Monts, in 1604, who obtained a charter from the King of France for making settlements and carrying on trade. In that charter it is called Cadie, and by the early settlers it was known as L'Acadie. A settlement was made at a place named Port Royal (now Annapolis), by Poutrincourt, a bosom friend of De Monts, but it was broken up in 1613, by Argall, from Virginia. These French emigrants built cottages sixteen years before the Pilgrims landed on the shores of New England. When English people came, antagonisms arising from difference of religion and nationality appeared, and, after repeated struggles between the English and French for the possession of Acadia, it was ceded to Great Britain by the treaty of Utrecht in 1713. But for many years not a dozen English families were se
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Abigail (Smith, (search)
Adams, Abigail (Smith´╝ë, Wife of President John Adams; born in Weymouth, Mass., Nov. 23, 1744; daughter of the Rev. William Smith; was married Aug. 25, 1764, when Mr. Adams was a rising young lawyer in Boston. In 1784 she joined her husband in France, and in the following year went with him to London, where neither her husband nor herself received the courtesies due their position. In 1789-1810 she resided at the seat of the national government, and passed the remainder of her life in the Quincy part of Braintree, dying Oct. 28, 1818. Her correspondence, preserved in Familiar letters of John Adams and his wife, Abigail Adams, during the Revolution, throws important light upon the life of the times which it cover
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Kendall, 1835- (search)
Adams, Charles Kendall, 1835- Educator and historian; born in Derby, Vt., Jan. 24, 1835; was graduated at the University of Michigan. and continued his studies in Germany, France, and Italy. In 1867-85 he was Professor of History in the University of Michigan; in 1885-92 was president of Cornell University; in 1892 became president of the University of Wisconsin; and from that year till 1895 was editor-in-chief of the revised edition of Johnson's Universal Cyclopaedia. He has published mmany, France, and Italy. In 1867-85 he was Professor of History in the University of Michigan; in 1885-92 was president of Cornell University; in 1892 became president of the University of Wisconsin; and from that year till 1895 was editor-in-chief of the revised edition of Johnson's Universal Cyclopaedia. He has published many monographs and papers in reviews, and Democracy and monarchy in France; Manual of Historical Literature; British orations; Christopher Columbus, his life and work, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John, 1735- (search)
ongress until he was appointed commissioner to France late in 1777, to supersede Deane. He advocate with Great Britain for peace. and sailed for France in November. He did not serve as commissioner government defied the power of Great Britain, France, Spain, and the Papal States, whose rulers werch had sprung up between the United States and France: Gentlemen of the Senate and Gentlemen off these States said to affect the interests of France, he thought it expedient to send to that count repelled with a decision which shall convince France and the world that we are not a degraded peoplces for securing these desirable objects with France, I shall institute a fresh attempt at negotiatures of justice we have a right to expect from France and every other nation. The diplomatic intercourse between the United States and France being at present suspended, the government has no meansendeavoring to adjust all our differences with France by amicable negotiation, the progress of the w[3 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John Quincy, 1767- (search)
ed at Harvard College in 1787. In February, 1778, he accompanied his father to France, where he studied the French and Latin languages for nearly two years. After an interval, he returned to France and resumed his studies, which were subsequently pursued at Amsterdam and at the University of Leyden. At the age of fourteen years,He afterwards accompanied his father (who was American minister) to England and France and returned home with him early in 1785. After his graduation at Harvard, he riter. In 1791 he published a series of articles in favor of neutrality with France over the signature of Publius. He was engaged in the diplomatic service of hisation of our independence, which inspired the preamble of our first treaty with France, which dictated our first treaty with Prussia, and the instructions under which the victorious combatant had been Britain. She had conquered the provinces of France. She had expelled her rival totally from the continent, over which, bounding h
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adet, Pierre Augustus, 1763-1832 (search)
of Washington with violations of the friendship which once existed between the United States and France. On Nov. 5, 1796, he issued the famous cockade proclamation, or order. calling upon all French of that contract [treaty of 1778] which assured to the United States their existence, and which France regarded as a pledge of the most sacred union between two people, the freest upon earth. He annssels into American waters. He complained of the British treaty as inimical to the interests of France. This paper. published in the Aurora, was intended more for the American people than for the Acans. In 1796 he presented to Congress. in behalf of the French nation, the tricolored flag of France; and just before he left, in 1797. he sent to the Secretary of State the famous note in which tpublic would treat all neutral flags as they permitted themselves to be treated by the English. Soon afterwards Adet suspended his diplomatic functions and returned to France. where he died in 1832.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
. The soil of this State was first trodden by Europeans in 1540. These were the followers of De Soto (q. v.). In 1702, Bienville. the French governor of Louisiana, entered Mobile Bay, and built a fort and trading-house at the mouth of Dog River. In 1711 the French founded Mobile, and there a colony prospered for a while. Negro State seal of Alabama. slaves were first brought into this colony by three French ships of war in 1721. By the treaty of 1763 this region was transferred by France to Great Britain. Alabama formed a portion of the State of Georgia, but in 1798 the country now included in the States of Alabama and Mississippi was organized as a Territory called Mississippi. After the Creeks disappeared the region of Alabama was rapidly settled by white people, and in 1819 it entered the Union as a State. The slave population increased more rapidly than the white. In the Democratic National Convention that was held at Charleston in 1860 the delegates of Alabama took t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama, the (search)
yland, and roamed the seas, plundering and destroying vessels belonging to American citizens. Her commander avoided contact with American armed vessels, but finally encountered the Kearsarge, The Alabama. Capt. John A. Winslow, off Cherbourg. France, in the summer of 1864. On June 19 Semmes went out of the harbor of Cherbourg to fight the Kearsarge. The Alabama was accompanied by a French frigate to a point beyond the territorial waters of France. At a distance of 7 miles from the CherbouFrance. At a distance of 7 miles from the Cherbourg breakwater, the Kearsarge turned and made for the Confederate cruiser, when, within 1,200 yards of her, the latter opened fire. After receiving two or three broadsides, the Kearsarge responded with telling effect. They fought for an hour, the steamers moving in a circle. At the end of the hour the Alabama was at the merey of her antagonist, and a white flag was displayed over her stern. Respecting this, Winslow ceased firing. Two minutes afterwards the Alabama treacherously fired two gun
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Algiers, (search)
French in 1830, and held under French military control till 1871, when a French civil administration was established. All of Algeria is now considered a part of France rather than a colony. The city of Algiers, under French domination, is the capital of the department and colony, is well equipped with educational institutions, and has become as orderly as any place in France. The population in 1891 was 82.585. The Barbary States derived their name from the Berbers, the ancient inhabitants. From their ports, especially from Algiers, went out piratical vessels to depredate upon the commerce of other peoples. So early as 1785 two American vessels hadd that for the space of a year Portugal should not afford protection to the vessels of any nation against Algerine corsairs. This was for the purpose of injuring France. The pirates were immediately let loose upon commerce. David Humphreys, who had been sent to Algiers by the government of the United States to make arrangements
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