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Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 54 0 Browse Search
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Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter) 48 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 40 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Greece (Greece) or search for Greece (Greece) in all documents.

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Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
ycophron, 911 Navaethus is a river of Italy.This paragraph is quoted from Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 921. It was called so, according to Apollodorus and the rest, because after the capture of Ilium the daughters of Laomedon, the sisters of Priam, to wit, Aethylla, Astyoche, and Medesicaste, with the other female captives, finding themselves in that part of Italy, and dreading slavery in Greece, set fire to the vessels; whence the river was called Navaethus and the women were called Nauprestides; and the Greeks who were with the women, having lost the vessels, settled there.The same story is told by Strabo, who calls the river Neaethus (Strab. 6.1.12). Stephanus Byzantius agrees with Apollodorus in giving Navaethus (*nau/aiqos) as the form of the name. Apollodorus derives the name from nau=s, “a ship,” and ai)/qw,
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
arried it away in a stalk of fennel.” He tells us, further, that the Greeks still call the plant nartheca. See P. de Tournefort, Relation d'un Voyage du Levant (Amsterdam, 1718), i.93. The plant is common all over Greece, and may be seen in particular abundance at Phalerum, near Athens. See W. G. Clark, Peloponnesus (London, 1858);, p. 111; J. Murr, Die Pflanzenwelt in der griechischen Mythologie (Innsbruck, 1890), p. 231. In Naxonymphs wafted him aloft on wings over the Thessalian mountains. See Ov. Met. 7.353ff. and having stored it with provisions he embarked in it with Pyrrha. But Zeus by pouring heavy rain from heaven flooded the greater part of Greece, so that all men were destroyed, except a few who fled to the high mountains in the neighborhood. It was then that the mountains in Thessaly parted, and that all the world outside the Isthmus and Peloponnese was overwhelmed. But
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
on the giants.See Apollod. 1.6.1ff. Not long afterwards he collected an Arcadian army, and being joined by volunteers from the first men in Greece he marched against Augeas.For the expedition of Herakles against Augeas, see Diod. 4.33.1; Paus. 5.1.10ff.; Paus. 5.2.1; Paus. 6.20.16; Scholiast ing their uncleanness, and permitted them once more to associate freely with their fellows. As to the restrictions imposed on homicides in ancient Greece, see Psyche's Task, 2nd ed. pp. 113ff.; Folk-Lore in the Old Testament, i.80, 83ff. The motive of the homicide's silence may have been a fear les) suggests that a similar custom formerly obtained in Israel., I do not remember to have met with any other seeming trace of a similar practice in Greece. proceeded to Mount Oeta, in the Trachinian territory, and there constructed a pyre,For the death of Herakles on the pyre, see Soph. Trach. 1191ff
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
k was naturally regarded as holy. Places struck by lightning were sacred to Zeus the Descender (*zeu\s kataiba/ths ) and were enclosed by a fence. Inscriptions marking such spots have been found in various parts of Greece. See Pollux ix.41; Paus. 5.14.10, with (Frazer, Paus. vol. iii. p. 565, vol. v. p. 614). Compare E. Rohde, Psyche(3), i.320ff.; H. Useher, “Keraunos,” Kleine Schriften, iv.477ff., (who quotes from Clemens Romving been purified by him he married Arsinoe, daughter of Phegeus,Paus. 8.24.8 and Prop. i.15.19 call her Alphesiboea. and gave her the necklace and the robe. But afterwards the ground became barren on his account,So Greece is said to have been afflicted with a dearth on account of a treacherous murder committed by Pelops. See below, Apollod. 3.12.6. Similarly the land of Thebes was supposed to be visited with barrenness of the soil, of cattle
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
er wrath sent a boar of extraordinary size and strength, which prevented the land from being sown and destroyed the cattle and the people that fell in with it. To attack this boar Oeneus called together all the noblest men of Greece, and promised that to him who should kill the beast he would give the skin as a prize. Now the men who assembled to hunt the boar were theseFor lists of the heroes who hunted the Calydonian boar, see Ov. Met. 8.299ff.; Hyginked, Oeneus received Periboea as a gift of honor; but Hesiod says that she was seduced by Hippostratus, son of Amarynceus, and that her father Hipponous sent her away from Olenus in Achaia to Oeneus, because he dwelt far from Greece, with an injunction to put her to death.Compare Diod. 4.35.1ff., according to whom Periboea alleged that she was with child by Ares. Sophocles wrote a tragedy on the subject; a few fragments of it remain (The Fragm
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
Ceyx ordered them out of the country, pleading his powerlessness to protect them. Compare Paus. 1.32.6. But when Eurystheus demanded their surrender and threatened war, they were afraid, and, quitting Trachis, fled through Greece. Being pursued, they came to Athens, and sitting down on the altar of Mercy, claimed protection.Compare Scholiast on Aristoph. Kn. 1151, who mentions that the Heraclids took refuge at the altar of Mercy. As to the altar of Mercy se death of Tisamenus. He says that, being expelled from Lacedaemon and Argos by the returning Heraclids, king Tisamenus led an army to Achaia and there fell in a battle with the Ionians, who then inhabited that district of Greece. See Paus. 2.18.8, Paus. 7.1.7ff. Their allies, Pamphylus and Dymas, the sons of Aegimius, also fell in the fight. When they had made themselves masters of Peloponnese, they set up three altars of Paternal Zeus, and sacrificed upon
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
Met. 7.1ff.; Valerius Flaccus, Argon. When the ship was built, and he inquired of the oracle, the god gave him leave to assemble the nobles of Greece and sail away. And those who assembled were as follows:For lists of the Argonauts, see Pind. P. 4.171ff.; Ap. Rhod., Argon. i.20ff.; Orphica, Argonstepmother;See below, Apollod. 3.15.3 with note. or by Poseidon, because he revealed to the children of Phrixus how they could sail from Colchis to Greece. The gods also sent the Harpies to him. These were winged female creatures, and when a table was laid for Phineus, they flew down from the sky and snatchedpromised to help him to yoke the bulls and to deliver to him the fleece, if he would swear to have her to wife and would take her with him on the voyage to Greece. When Jason swore to do so, she gave him a drug with which she bade him anoint his shield, spear, and body when he was about to yoke the bulls; for
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