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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 188 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 88 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 60 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 32 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 30 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 24 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 16 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the foresaid M. Stephen Burrough, An. 1557. from Colmogro to Wardhouse, which was sent to seeke the Bona Esperanza, the Bona Confidentia, and the Philip and Mary, which were not heard of the yeere before. (search)
he said, no, they should not: for this land is my kings, and therefore be bolde to come hither. The Kerils and the Lappians solde no fish, untill the said deputie had looked upon it, and had given them leave to sell. I asked him what wares were best for us to bring thither, and he said, silver, pearles, cloth, blewe, red, and greene, meale, strong beere, wine, pewter, foxe cases, and gold. The Lappians pay tribute to the Emperour of Russia, to the king of Denmarke, and to the king of Sweden . He tolde me that the River Cola is little more then 20. leagues to the Southwards of Kegor, where we should have great plentie of salmon, if corne were any thing cheape in Russia : for then poore men would resort thither to kill salmon. The Dutchmen tolde me that they had made a good yeere of this, but the Kerils complained of it, because they could not sell all their fish, and that which they sold was as pleased the Dutchmen, and at their own price. I asked the Kerils at what price t
he said, no, they should not: for this land is my kings, and therefore be bolde to come hither. The Kerils and the Lappians solde no fish, untill the said deputie had looked upon it, and had given them leave to sell. I asked him what wares were best for us to bring thither, and he said, silver, pearles, cloth, blewe, red, and greene, meale, strong beere, wine, pewter, foxe cases, and gold. The Lappians pay tribute to the Emperour of Russia, to the king of Denmarke, and to the king of Sweden . He tolde me that the River Cola is little more then 20. leagues to the Southwards of Kegor, where we should have great plentie of salmon, if corne were any thing cheape in Russia : for then poore men would resort thither to kill salmon. The Dutchmen tolde me that they had made a good yeere of this, but the Kerils complained of it, because they could not sell all their fish, and that which they sold was as pleased the Dutchmen, and at their own price. I asked the Kerils at what price t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A Letter of Master Anthonie Jenkinson upon his returne from Boghar to the worshipful Master Henrie Lane Agent for the Moscovie companie resident in Vologda, written in the Mosco the 18. of September, 1559. (search)
rofite to bee had in the sales of a small quantitie, (all such evill fortunes beeing escaped as to us have chaunced this present voyage,) for then it woulde be a trade woorthie to bee followed. Sir, for that I trust you will be here shortly (which I much desire) I will deferre the discourse with you at large untill your comming, as well touching my travel, as of other things. Sir, John Lucke departed from hence toward England the seventh of this present, and intendeth to passe by the way of Sweden , by whom I sent a letter to the worshipfull Companie, and have written that I intend to come downe unto Colmogro to be readie there at the next shipping to imbarke my selfe for England, declaring that my service shal not be needfull here, for that you are a man able to serve their worships in greater affaires then they have heere to doe, so farre as I perceive. As touching the Companies affaires heere, I referre you to Christopher Hudsons letters, for that I am but newly arrived. Having her
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage, wherein Osep Napea the Moscovite Ambas- sadour returned home into his countrey, with his entertainement at his arrivall, at Colmogro: and a large description of the maners of the Countrey. (search)
her called Emperours nor kings but only Ruese Velike, that is to say, great Duke. And as this Emperor which now is Ivan Vasilivich, doeth exceede his predecessors in name, that is, from a Duke to an Emperour, even so much by report he doeth exceede them in stoutnesse of courage and valiantnesse, and a great deale more: for he is no more afraid of his enemies which are not few, then the Hobbie of the larks. His enemies with whom he hath warres for the most part are these: Litto, Poland , Sweden , Denmarke, Lifland, the Crimmes, Nagaians, and the whole nation of the Tartarians, which are a stoute and a hardie people as any under the Sunne. This Emperour useth great familiaritie, as wel unto all his nobles and subjects, as also unto strangers which serve him either in his warres, or in occupations: for his pleasure is that they shall dine oftentimes in the yeere in his presence, and besides that he is oftentimes abroad, either at one Church or another, and walking with his noble m
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The maners, usages, and ceremonies of the Russes. (search)
her called Emperours nor kings but only Ruese Velike, that is to say, great Duke. And as this Emperor which now is Ivan Vasilivich, doeth exceede his predecessors in name, that is, from a Duke to an Emperour, even so much by report he doeth exceede them in stoutnesse of courage and valiantnesse, and a great deale more: for he is no more afraid of his enemies which are not few, then the Hobbie of the larks. His enemies with whom he hath warres for the most part are these: Litto, Poland , Sweden , Denmarke, Lifland, the Crimmes, Nagaians, and the whole nation of the Tartarians, which are a stoute and a hardie people as any under the Sunne. This Emperour useth great familiaritie, as wel unto all his nobles and subjects, as also unto strangers which serve him either in his warres, or in occupations: for his pleasure is that they shall dine oftentimes in the yeere in his presence, and besides that he is oftentimes abroad, either at one Church or another, and walking with his noble m
her called Emperours nor kings but only Ruese Velike, that is to say, great Duke. And as this Emperor which now is Ivan Vasilivich, doeth exceede his predecessors in name, that is, from a Duke to an Emperour, even so much by report he doeth exceede them in stoutnesse of courage and valiantnesse, and a great deale more: for he is no more afraid of his enemies which are not few, then the Hobbie of the larks. His enemies with whom he hath warres for the most part are these: Litto, Poland , Sweden , Denmarke, Lifland, the Crimmes, Nagaians, and the whole nation of the Tartarians, which are a stoute and a hardie people as any under the Sunne. This Emperour useth great familiaritie, as wel unto all his nobles and subjects, as also unto strangers which serve him either in his warres, or in occupations: for his pleasure is that they shall dine oftentimes in the yeere in his presence, and besides that he is oftentimes abroad, either at one Church or another, and walking with his noble m
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. Henrie Lane to M. Richard Hakluit, concerning the first ambassage to our most gracious Queene Elizabeth from the Russian Emperour anno 1567, and other notable matters incident to those places and times. (search)
s king Sigismundus (whose ambassadours very sumptuous I have scene at Mosco) was reported to be too milde in suffering the Moscovites. Before our trafficke they overranne his great dukedome of Lituania , and tooke Smolensco, carrying the people captives to Mosco. And in the yere 1563, as appeareth by Thomas Alcocks letter, they suffered the Russe likewise in that Duchy to take a principall city called Polotzko, with the lord and people thereof. Likewise the said Sigismundus and the king of Sweden did not looke to the protection of Livonia , but lost all, except Rie and Revel, and the Russe made the Narve his port to trafficke, not onely to us, but to Lubec and others, generall. And still from those parts the Moscovites were furnished out of Dutchland by enterlopers with all arts and artificers, and had few or none by us. The Italians also furnished them with engines of warre, and taught them warrelike stratagemes, and the arte of fortification. In the dayes of Sigismund, the Rus
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The deposition of M. William Burrough to certaine Interrogatories ministred unto him concerning the Narve, Kegor, &c. to what king or prince they doe appertaine and are subject, made the 23 of June, 1576. These articles seeme to have bene ministred upon the quarel between Alderman Bond the elder, and the Moscovie company, for his trade to the Narve without their consent. (search)
neere unto them. Hee hath also hearde that in the time of peace betweene the saide Emperour of Russia, and the kings of Sweden , there was yeerely for the king of Sweden one or more that came into Lappia unto divers places, in maner as the king ofSweden one or more that came into Lappia unto divers places, in maner as the king of Denmarkes servant useth to doe, and did demaund of them some tribute or duetie which they willingly paide: but since the late warres betweene the saide Emperour and king of Sweden , hee hath not heard of any thing that hath bene paide by them to thSweden , hee hath not heard of any thing that hath bene paide by them to the king of Sweden : such is the simplicitie of this people the Lappies, that they would rather give tribute to all those that border upon their countrey, then by denying it have their ill willes. But the trueth is, as this Deponent saith, that thSweden : such is the simplicitie of this people the Lappies, that they would rather give tribute to all those that border upon their countrey, then by denying it have their ill willes. But the trueth is, as this Deponent saith, that the saide mightie prince the Emperor of Russia is the chiefe lord and governour of the saide countrey of Lappia, his lawes and orders are observed by them, hee takes toll and custome, &c. of them. They are infidels, but if any of them become Christian
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine reasons to disswade the use of a trade to the Narve aforesaide, by way through Sweden . (search)
Certaine reasons to disswade the use of a trade to the Narve aforesaide, by way through Sweden . THE merchandise of the Narve are grosse wares, viz. flaxe, hempe, waxe, tallow and hides. Thet that place standeth upon the agreement and liking of the Emperour of Russia, with the king of Sweden : for all these merchandises that are brought thither come from Plescove, Novogrod, and other pahose merchandises from Narve to Stockholm , or what other place shall bee thought convenient in Sweden , it must be in vessels of those countries, which wilbe of smal force to resist Freebooters, or r that shall make quarel or offer violence against them. When the goods are brought into Sweden , they must be discharged, and new laden into smaller vessels, to cary the same by river or lakeme it? The danger that may grow in our trade to Russia by way of S. Nicholas, through the displeasure that the Emperour may conceive by our trade with the Sweden to Narve is also to be considered.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The description of the countrey of Russia, with the bredth, length, and names of the Shires. (search)
being surprised of late yeeres by the Kings of Poland and Sweden . These Shires and Provinces are reduced all into foure Jurnot intire nor clearely limited, by reason of the kings of Sweden and Denmarke, that have divers Townes there, aswell as theland sea, which now is in the handes and possession of the Sweden . Likewise the stopping of the passage overland by the way or the present) on the other side against the Polonian and Sweden : thinking it best policie to use their service upon the coery yere with the Tartar, & many times with the Polonian & Sweden ) the foure Lords of the Chetfirds send forth their summonsRusse is noted to have ever the worse of the Polonian and Sweden . If any behave himselfe more valiantly then the rest, g after was betraied, and surrendred againe to the king of Sweden . On the Southeast side, they have got the kingdomes ofare subject to the Emperor of Russia, and the two kings of Sweden and Denmarke: which all exact tribute and custome of them
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