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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 188 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 88 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 60 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 32 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 30 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 24 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Sweden (Sweden) or search for Sweden (Sweden) in all documents.

Your search returned 94 results in 51 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbott, Lyman, 1835- (search)
negative. Our territory has extended until it nearly equals in dimensions that of the old Roman Empire in its palmiest days. Our population has not only increased in numbers, but become heterogeneous in character. We are no longer an Anglo-Saxon colony, emerging into statehood. We are Scandinavian, German, Hungarian, Pole, Austrian, Italian, French, and Spanish; all the nations of the earth are represented, not only in our population, but in our suffrages. Whatever interests Norway and Sweden, Holland and Belgium, Germany, Italy, France, or England, interests our people, because from these countries respectively multitudes of our people have come. Meanwhile, our growth, and still more the test to which we have been subjected by foreign war and by civil war, have done much to demonstrate the stability of institutions which, a hundred years ago, were purely experimental and largely theoretical. Other lands have caught inspiration from our life; the whole progress of Europe has be
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Acrelius, Israel, 1714-1800 (search)
Acrelius, Israel, 1714-1800 Clergyman: born in Osteraker, Sweden, Dec. 25, 1714: was ordained in 1743; came to America to preside over the Swedish congregations in New Sweden in 1749. His work was marked with success, but after seven years toil he was forced to resign by ill-health, and returned to Sweden. His publicationsen in 1749. His work was marked with success, but after seven years toil he was forced to resign by ill-health, and returned to Sweden. His publications include The Swedish colonies in America (1759, translated into English in 1874), and articles on America. He died in Fellingsbro, April 25, 1800. See New Sweden, founding of.den in 1749. His work was marked with success, but after seven years toil he was forced to resign by ill-health, and returned to Sweden. His publications include The Swedish colonies in America (1759, translated into English in 1874), and articles on America. He died in Fellingsbro, April 25, 1800. See New Sweden, founding of.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John, 1735- (search)
a as forming a weight in that balance of power in Europe which never can be forgotten or neglected. It would not only be against our interest, but it would be doing wrong to one-half of Europe, at least, if we should voluntarily throw our-selves into either scale. It is a natural policy for a nation that studies to be neutral to consult with other nations engaged in the same studies and pursuits. At the same time that measures might be pursued with this view, our treaties with Prussia and Sweden, one of which is expired and the other near expiring, might be renewed. Gentlemen of the House of Representatives.--It is particularly your province to consider the state of the public finances, and to adopt such measures respecting them as exigencies shall be found to require. The preservation of public credit, the regular extinguishment of the public debt, and a provision of funds to defray any extraordinary expenses will, of course, call for your serious attention. Although the impos
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John Quincy, 1767- (search)
me with him early in 1785. After his graduation at Harvard, he studied law with the eminent Theophilus Parsons, practised at Boston, and soon became distinguished as a political writer. In 1791 he published a series of articles in favor of neutrality with France over the signature of Publius. He was engaged in the diplomatic service of his country as minister, successively, to Holland, England, and Prussia from 1794 to 1801. He received a commission, in 1798, to negotiate a treaty with Sweden. At Berlin he wrote a series of Letters from Silesia. Mr. Adams married Louisa, daughter of Joshua Johnson, American consul at London, in 1797. He took a seat in the Senate of Massachusetts in 1802, and he occupied one in that of the United States from 1803 until 1808. when disagreeing with the legislature of Massachusetts on the embargo question, he resigned. From 1806 to 1809 he was Professor of Rhetoric in Harvard College. In the latter year he was appointed by President Madison mini
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andrews, Christopher Columbus, 1829- (search)
Andrews, Christopher Columbus, 1829- Lawyer and diplomatist; born in Hillsboro, N. H., Oct. 27, 1829; was educated at the Harvard Law School; admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1850, and later settled in St. Cloud, Minn. In the Civil War he rose from the ranks to brevet major-general in the Union army. In 1869-77 he was United States minister to Norway and Sweden, and in 1882-85 consul-general to Rio de Janeiro. He has published a History of the campaign of Mobile; Brazil. Its conditions and prospects; Administrative reform, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arbitration, international. (search)
flict of ideas concerning the measure. The treaty provided for the arbitration of all matters in difference between the countries which could not be adjusted by diplomatic correspondence. Matters involving pecuniary claims to the maximum extent of $500,000 were to be settled by a board of three arbitrators, composed of a juror of repute selected one by each country, these two to agree upon a third. If the two arbitrators failed to agree upon a third, he was to be selected by King Oscar of Sweden. In respect to matters involving a larger sum, or in respect to territorial claims, the matter was first to go before a board constituted as above described, and if the three arbitrators came to a unanimous decision their report was to be final. But if they were not unanimous, either England or the United States could demand a review of the award. In that case a tribunal of five members was to be formed in the same manner as the smaller one, and King Oscar was still to be referee. Bounda
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arbitration, international Court of, (search)
ry of Justice, ex-Delegate of Spain to the Conference on Private International Law at The Hague. Dr. Manuel Torres Campos, Professor of International Law at the University of Grenada, associate member of the Institute of International Law. Sweden and Norway. Mr. S. R. D. K. d'olivecrona, member of the International Law institute, ex-Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the Kingdom of Sweden, Doctor of Laws and Letters at Stockholm. Mr. G. Gram, ex-Minister of State of Norway, GSweden, Doctor of Laws and Letters at Stockholm. Mr. G. Gram, ex-Minister of State of Norway, Governor of the Province of Hamar, Norway. United States. Mr. Benjamin Harrison, ex-President of the United States. Mr. Melville W. Fuller, Chief-Justice of the United States. Mr. John W. Griggs, Attorney-General of the United States. Mr. George Gray, United States Circuit Judge. First Secretary of the Court — J. J. Rochussen. Second Secretary of the Court — Jonkheer W. Roell. the administrative council. The Administrative Council consists of the Minister of Foreign Aff
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arctic exploration. (search)
was enabled to sail, with a well-furnished company, in the ship Polaris, for the polar seas, in June, 1871. In October Hall left the vessel, and started northward on a sledge expedition. On his return he suddenly sickened and died, and the Polaris returned without accomplishing much. The passage from the coast of western Europe, around the north of that continent and of Asia, into the Pacific Ocean, was first accomplished in the summer of 1879, by Professor Nordenskjold, an accomplished Swedish explorer, in the steamship Vega. She passed through Bering Strait into the Pacific Ocean, and reached Japan in the first week in September. Thus the great problem has been solved. the Jeannette, Lieutenant De Long, an American exploring vessel, was lost on the coast of Siberia, in 1881. The most important of the recent expeditions into Arctic legions by Americans are those of Lieut. (now Brig.-Gen.) Adolphus W. Greely and of Lieut. Robert E. Peary (qq. v.), who has made several voyag
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burlingame, Anson, 1820- (search)
r. Burlingame minister to Austria. He having spoken in favor of Hungarian independence, the Austrian government refused to receive him, and he was sent as ambassador to China. There he carried forward important negotiations; and when, in 1867, he announced to the Chinese government his intention of returning home, Prince Kung, the regent of the empire, offered to appoint him special ambassador to the United States and the great European powers, for the purpose of framing treaties of amity with those nations. This high honor Mr. Burlingame accepted; and at the head of a retinue of Chinese officials, he arrived in the United States in March, 1868. From his own country Mr. Burlingame proceeded on his mission to England, France, Denmark, Sweden. Holland, and Prussia. He was well received, and he negotiated treaties with all but France. He had just entered upon negotiations at St. Petersburg, early in 1870, when he died of pneumonia after an illness of only a few days, Feb. 23, 1870.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Centennial Exhibition, (search)
g the products of their industries. There was a generous response, and thirty-three nations, besides the United States, were represented—namely, Argentine Republic, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chili, China, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Great Britain and Ireland, India and British colonies, Hawaiian Islands, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Liberia. Luxemburg Grand Duchy, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Orange Free State, Peru, Portugal, Russia, Santo Domingo, Spain and Spanish colonies, Siam, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunis, Turkey, and Venezuela. A Woman's executive committee was formed, composed of Philadelphians, who raised money sufficient among the women of the Union for the erection of a building for the exhibition exclusively of women's work—sculpture, painting, engraving, lithography, literature, telegraphy, needlework of all kinds, etc.— at a cost of $30,000. The building was called the Women's pavilion. In it were exhibited beautiful needlework from England and etchings from the <
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