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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 84 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 54 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 36 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 20 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Adelphi: The Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 14 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 12 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 10 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.). You can also browse the collection for Cyprus (Cyprus) or search for Cyprus (Cyprus) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 4, line 3 (search)
Menelaos overheard him and said, "No one, my sons, can hold his own with Zeus, for his house and everything about him is immortal; but among mortal men - well, there may be another who has as much wealth as I have, or there may not; but at all events I have traveled much and have undergone much hardship, for it was nearly eight years before I could get home with my fleet. I went to Cyprus, Phoenicia and the Egyptians; I went also to the Ethiopians, the Sidonians, and the Erembians, and to Libya where the lambs have horns as soon as they are born, and the sheep bear lambs three times a year. Every one in that country, whether master or man, has plenty of cheese, meat, and good milk, for the ewes yield all the year round. But while I was traveling and getting great riches among these people, my brother was secretly and shockingly murdered through the perfidy of his wicked wife, so that I have no pleasure in being lord of all this wealth. Whoever your parents may be they must have told y
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 8, line 8 (search)
"Hephaistos," said Poseidon, "if Ares goes away without paying his damages, I will pay you myself." So Hephaistos answered, "In this case I cannot and must not refuse you." Thereon he loosed the bonds that bound them, and as soon as they were free they scampered off, Ares to Thrace and laughter-loving Aphrodite to Cyprus and to Paphos, where is her grove and her altar fragrant with burnt offerings. Here the Graces bathed her, and anointed her with oil of ambrosia such as the immortal gods make use of, and they clothed her in raiment of the most enchanting beauty. Thus sang the bard, and both Odysseus and the seafaring Phaeacians were charmed as they heard him. Then Alkinoos told Laodamas and Halios to dance alone, for there was no one to compete with them. So they took a red ball which Polybos had made for them, and one of them bent himself backwards and threw it up towards the clouds, while the other jumped from off the ground and caught it with ease before it came down again. Whe
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 17, line 11 (search)
surrounded. The Egyptians killed many of us, and took the rest alive to do forced labor for them; as for myself, they gave me to a friend who met them, to take to Cyprus, Dmetor by name, son of Iasos, who was a great man in Cyprus. Thence I am come hither in a state of great misery." Then Antinoos said, "What daimôn can have sentCyprus. Thence I am come hither in a state of great misery." Then Antinoos said, "What daimôn can have sent such a pestilence to plague us during our dinner? Get out, into the open part of the court, or I will give you Egypt and Cyprus over again for your insolence and importunity; you have begged of all the others, and they have given you lavishly, for they have abundance round them, and it is easy to be free with other people's propering our dinner? Get out, into the open part of the court, or I will give you Egypt and Cyprus over again for your insolence and importunity; you have begged of all the others, and they have given you lavishly, for they have abundance round them, and it is easy to be free with other people's property when there is plenty of it."