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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 202 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 120 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 102 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 40 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 18 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 12, 1863., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Japan (Japan) or search for Japan (Japan) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
d discharged. The Stonewall was subsequently surrendered to the United States government, and by that government sold to Japan. She was for some years in the naval service of Japan, and finally sunk in a typhoon. After leaving the Stonewall, inJapan, and finally sunk in a typhoon. After leaving the Stonewall, in April, 1865, in the harbor of Havana, I proceeded to Mexico, where I was engaged in engineering on the first line of railway in that country. Returning to this country in the summer of 1866, I visited the Gosport Navy Yard, at Norfolk, and there, apanese government. The Stonewall made the long journey to the Orient, but shortly afterwards foundered off the coast of Japan in a gale. Of the officers on the Stonewall, three are now living—Dr. Green and Mr. Virginius Newton, of this city, annd Mr. Seward, the United States Secretary of State. She was subsequently sold by the United States to the government of Japan. Technical questions. It may be thought by those who are inclined to be severely critical that in the arrangements