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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Mitchel's commercial views. (search)
d if they are satisfied that a given course of action will not be profitable, they cannot be expected to engage in it simply to gratify him. Mr. Mitchel propounds a theory of negro-importation in a gay, rollicking, humorous spirit, in which the blood-thirstiness of the thug is agreeably dashed with the overflowing humor of the Hibernian. He is especially funny about the king of Ashantee, who has a lot of fine cheap fellows for sale, and Mr. Mitchel proposes, in his light way, to patronize the king of Ashantee. He plants himself upon what he calls the human-flesh platform, and gloats and giggles over his horrible theories, as we may imagine the king of Dahomey dilating with rapture as he puts the last skull upon one of his amiable pyramids. Well is it to be merry and wise, but we suppose that we must not blame this poor Exile of Erin for being merry, and otherwise. If a man must eat the bread of dependence, we will not grudge him the marmalade of merriment. December 1, 1858.
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), A banner with a strange Device (search)
t: Because thou hast done this, thou art cursed above all cattle, and above every beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life? Whatever may be the temptation of cotton, it is hardly probable that foreign nations will fall violently in love with the rattle-snake. They will fear to meet him in every bale; they will find him printed on every shirt; and they will rank the flag upon which he is painted with the black banner of pirates or the threatening devices of Asiatic barbarians. Let the Southern Confederates, then, revise their blazon! They have a large variety from which to select — lions, leopards, pelicans, unicorns, bears, griffins, dragons — the whole menagerie of heraldry. Why will they endeavor to introduce such a disagreeable creature as the rattle-snake into the society of Christian nations? If they must have one on their flag, the King of Dahomey is the foreign potentate for their diplomacy. January 31, 18
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), A Southern Diarist. (search)
lavicle would, we fancy, materially mitigate his ardor. It was upon Saturday, Jan. 12, while hundreds were engaged in training with pistol and rifle, the afternoon being, as we are told, vocal with the music of preparation, that the diarist made the following entry: If it were conceivable that all our men could be killed, South Carolina need not despair; her women can defend her! The imagination is thus carried back to the Amazonian regiments, to the petticoated squadrons of the King of Dahomey, to Boadicea and Joan of Are. It is rather a drawback to find that the Lady Lancers, the Amazonian Artillery, the Female Fusileers, the Sweet Sappers, the Modern Miners, the Pretty Pioneers, the Side-saddle Cavalry, will not be wanted until all our men are killed. Not being a woman, and still less a she-soldier, we cannot undertake to speak with absolute accuracy; but we should be a little dubious about the female fighting after the quietus of all the men. How will Mrs. Col. Cotton be able
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Humanities South. (search)
and an irrefragable argument against its possible perpetuity? No: in a slaveholding Republic ignorance is bliss, and enlightenment must bring the torture of remorse and the trembling of fear. The prototype of the Southern slaveholder is the African King, who, gleaming with palm-oil and glorious in a painted skin, drives down to the shore his squalid files of shivering captives, and sells them to tho missionary of civilization, whose pirate bark is anchored in the offing. The Monarch of Dahomey is the real founder of the Confederate States of America. Their enlightenment, their theology, their civilization, their political economy, have all been learned of that hideous and howling savage; and all they are, and all they pretend to be, and all they care to be, the barbarians of the Slave Coast have been before them. Yes: they do well to give up their colleges; they will give up their churches next — and then — who knows?--perhaps their clothes! Given the independence of the Sou
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The necessity of Servility. (search)
oaning globe? Must we ape the vices of the past before we can copy its achievements? Must we ignore all the advantages which discovery and invention have brought to us, and seek for national greatness only in the resuscitation of bygone realities? Would we, if we could, make the United States, but a poor copy of Assyria, Greece, Rome, Carthage? O agony — that centuries should reap No mellower harvest. Greatness!--why there is n't a greater potentate in all Africa, than the King of Dahomey! In the midst of his butcheries, wading ankle deep in human blood, building his pyramid of human skulls, he is feared by surrounding tribes, and positively adored by his own! Nations calling themselves civilized, can be great in the same way — that is, if they please to relapse into savagery, there is a backward path for them, as there is for individuals — and so they may discard refined apparel for nose-rings, war-paint and nakedness — they may pull down what reporters call palatial res
Choate, Rufus45, 58, 84 Choate, Rufus Scrambles of his Biographers102 Cumberland Presbyterian Church68 Cumberland Presbyterian Newspaper79 Columbia (S. C.), Bell-Ringing in125 Commons, House of, on Gregory's Motion168 Colleges, Southern172 Cotton, Moral Influence of201 Congress, The Confederate222, 238 Clergymen, Second--Hand224 Carlyle, Thomas323 Davis, Jefferson42, 274, 279, 282, 283, 288, 380, 388, 346 Diarist, A Southern124 Dargan, Chancellor160 Dahomey, the Original of the Confederacy175 De Bow on Confederate Manufactures230 Debt, The Confederate285 Everett, Edward45, 181 Fielder, Herbert, his Pamphlet46 Fillmore, Millard116 Floyd, John B162 Fortescue on Slavery303 Free States, Southern Opinion of316 Freedmen, Probable Vices of362 Franklin on British Policy366 Fast Day, Mr. Davis's377 Gregory, M. P.163 Greenville, Lord, on Emancipation329 Goethe on the Future of America808 Greatness, Historical