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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Suppliant Women (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 4 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Leonard C. Smithers) 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 2 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Eclogues (ed. J. B. Greenough) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 58 (search)
deprived now of the pampered life they had enjoyed, spent the nights in the very midst of the enemies' lasciviousness, enduring terrible indignities, and some were obliged to see their daughters of marriageable age suffering treatment improper for their years. For the savagery of the barbarians spared neither free-born youths nor maidens, but exposed these unfortunates to dreadful disasters. Consequently, as the women reflected upon the slavery that would be their lot in Libya, as they saw themselves together with their children in a condition in which they possessed no legal rights and were subject to insolent treatment and thus compelled to obey masters, and as they noted that these masters used an unintelligible speech and had a bestial character, they mourned for their living children as dead, and receiving into their souls as a piercing wound each and every outrage committed against them, they became frantic with suffering and vehemen
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 79 (search)
e Syracusans, sending ambassadors to Carthage, not only censured them for the war but required that for the future they cease from hostilities. To them the Carthaginians gave ambiguous answers and set about assembling great armaments in Libya, since their desire was fixed on enslaving all the cities of the island; but before sending their forces across to Sicily they picked out volunteers from their citizens and the other inhabitants of Libya and founded in Sicily the Carthaginians gave ambiguous answers and set about assembling great armaments in Libya, since their desire was fixed on enslaving all the cities of the island; but before sending their forces across to Sicily they picked out volunteers from their citizens and the other inhabitants of Libya and founded in Sicily right at the warm (therma) springs a city which they named Therma.It was near Himera (Cic. In Verr. 2.35); the springs are mentioned in Book 4.23.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 80 (search)
ain citizens who were held in high esteem among the Carthaginians with large sums of money, some to Iberia and others to the Baliarides Islands, with orders to recruit as many mercenaries as possible. And they themselves canvassed Libya, enrolling as soldiers Libyans and Phoenicians and the stoutest from among their own citizens. Moreover they summoned soldiers also from the nations and kings who were their allies, Maurusians and Nomads and certain peoples who dwell in the regions toward Cyrene. Also from Italy they hired Campanians and brought them over to Libya; for they knew that their aid would be of great assistance to them and that the Campanians who had been left behind in Sicily, because they had fallen out with the Carthaginians,Cp. chap. 62.5. would fight on the side of the Sicilian Greeks. And when the armaments were finally assembled at Carthage, the sum total of the troops collected together with the cav
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 81 (search)
nd beauty and the greater part of their territory was planted in olive-trees from which they gathered an abundant harvest and sold to Carthage; for since Libya at that time was not yet planted in fruit-trees,But cp. Book 4.17.4 where we are told that Heracles planted much of Libya in vineyards and olive f Libya in vineyards and olive orchards. the inhabitants of the territory belonging to Acragas took in exchange for their products the wealth of Libya and accumulated fortunes of unbelievable size. Of this wealth there remain among them many evidences, which it will not be foreign to our purpose to discuss briefly. f Libya in vineyards and olive orchards. the inhabitants of the territory belonging to Acragas took in exchange for their products the wealth of Libya and accumulated fortunes of unbelievable size. Of this wealth there remain among them many evidences, which it will not be foreign to our purpose to discuss briefly.
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 386 (search)
is not in boast—in ships to Troy, no tyrant commanding any troops by force, but leading the young men of Hellas by voluntary consent. And some of these can be counted no longer alive, others as having a joyful escape from the sea, bringing home again names thought to be of the dead. But I wander miserably over the swelling waves of the gray ocean, ever since I sacked the towers of Ilion; and although I long to come home, I am not thought worthy by the gods to achieve this. I have sailed to Libya's deserts and all its inhospitable landing-places; and whenever I draw near my native land, the blast drives me back again, and no favoring wind has ever entered my sails to let me come home. And now I am cast up on this shore, a miserable shipwrecked sailor who has lost his friends; and my ship is broken into many pieces against the rocks. But out of its cleverly-wrought fastenings the keel was left, on which I made my difficult escape by an unexpected chance, and also Helen with me, whom
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 758 (search)
iews about seers agree exactly with this old man's; whoever has the gods as friends would have the best prophecy at home. Helen All right; so far all is well. But how you were saved, my poor husband, from Troy, there is no gain in knowing, yet friends have a desire to learn what their friends have suffered. Menelaos Truly you have asked a great deal all at once. Why should I tell you about our losses in the Aegean, and Nauplios' beacons on Euboia, and my visits to Crete and the cities of Libya, and the mountain-peaks of Perseus? For I would not satisfy you with the tale, and by telling you these evils I would suffer still, as I did when I experienced them; and so my grief would be doubled. Helen Your answer is better than my question. Leave out the rest, and tell me only this: how long were you a weary wanderer over the surface of the sea? Menelaos Besides those ten years in Troy, I went through seven cycles of years on board ship. Helen Alas, poor man, you have spoken of a l
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1206 (search)
Theoklymenos What is this man's country, and where did he come from, to land here? Helen He is a Hellene, one of the Achaeans who saiIed with my husband. Theoklymenos What kind of death does he say Menelaos died? Helen The most piteous, in the watery waves at sea. Theoklymenos On what part of the barbarous ocean was he sailing? Helen He was cast up on the harborless rocks of Libya. Theoklymenos How did this man not perish if he was sailing with him? Helen There are times when common men have more luck than their betters. Theoklymenos Where did he leave the wreckage of his ship before coming here? Helen Where ruin may come upon it— but not on Menelaos! Theoklymenos He is already ruined. In what ship did this man come? Helen Sailors happened to meet him and took him up, as he says. Theoklymenos Where then is that evil creature that was sent to Troy in your place? Helen You mean the cloud image? It has gone into the air. Theoklymenos O Priam, and Trojan lands, how you
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1478 (search)
Chorus Oh, that we had wings to cleave the air, where the birds of Libya go in their ranks, leaving the winter rain, obedient to the piping of their veteran leader, who raises his exultant cry as he wings his way over unmoistened and crop-bearing plains of the earth. O you winged long-necked comrades of the racing clouds, go on beneath the Pleiades in their central station and Orion of the night; deliver the message, as you settle on Eurotas' banks, that Menelaos has sacked the city of Dardanos, and will come home.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 46 (search)
nd to Dodona, while others were despatched to Amphiaraus and Trophonius,That is, to the oracular shrines of these legendary heroes. and others to Branchidae in the Milesian country. These are the Greek oracles to which Croesus sent for divination: and he told others to go inquire of Ammon in Libya. His intent in sending was to test the knowledge of the oracles, so that, if they were found to know the truth, he might send again and ask if he should undertake an expedition against the Persians. nd to Dodona, while others were despatched to Amphiaraus and Trophonius,That is, to the oracular shrines of these legendary heroes. and others to Branchidae in the Milesian country. These are the Greek oracles to which Croesus sent for divination: and he told others to go inquire of Ammon in Libya. His intent in sending was to test the knowledge of the oracles, so that, if they were found to know the truth, he might send again and ask if he should undertake an expedition against the Persians.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 2, chapter 8 (search)
t is bounded on the one side by the mountains of Arabia, which run north to south, always running south towards the sea called the Red Sea. In these mountains are the quarries that were hewn out for making the pyramids at Memphis. This way, then, the mountains run, and end in the places of which I have spoken; their greatest width from east to west, as I learned by inquiry, is a two months' journey, and their easternmost boundaries yield frankincense. Such are these mountains. On the side of Libya, Egypt is bounded by another range of rocky mountains among which are the pyramids; these are all covered with sand, and run in the same direction as those Arabian hills that run southward. Beyond Heliopolis, there is no great distance—in Egypt, that is:w(s ei)=nai ai)gu/ptou; so much of the Nile valley being outside Egypt. But it is possible that the words may mean “no great distance, for Egypt,” i.e. no great distance relatively to the size of the country. the narrow land has a length of o<
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