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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
ales de la Propagation de la Foi, xxxii. (Lyons, 1860), pp. 439ff. The Eastern Melanesians believe that living people can go down to the land of the dead and return alive to the upper world. Persons who have done so relate how in the nether world they were warned by friendly ghosts to eat nothing there. See R. H. Codrington, The Melanesians (Oxford, 1891), pp. 277, 286. Similar beliefs prevail and similar tales are told among the Maoris of New Zealand. For example, a woman who believed that she had died and passed to the spirit land, related on her return how there she met with her dead father, who said to her, “You must go back to the earth, for there is no one now left to take care of my grandchild. But remember, if you once eat food in this place, you can never more return to life; so beware not to taste anything offered to you.” See E. Shortland, Traditions and Superstitions of the New
nts?--The London Daily News published the following communication: Sir: We are at war with the New-Zealanders — we for empire, they for independence! What if President Lincoln recognize their belligerent rights? and what if New-York capitalists take a New-Zealand loan — and if an American Laird furnish a New-Zealand Alabama, to be commissioned by a Maori lieutenant, and manned by British seamen from the naval reserve, and so on? Why not? and what then? I am, sir, etc., Nemesis. nts?--The London Daily News published the following communication: Sir: We are at war with the New-Zealanders — we for empire, they for independence! What if President Lincoln recognize their belligerent rights? and what if New-York capitalists take a New-Zealand loan — and if an American Laird furnish a New-Zealand Alabama, to be commissioned by a Maori lieutenant, and manned by British seamen from the naval reserve, and so on? Why not? and what then? I am, sir, etc., Ne
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.13 (search)
llowing a few of the bacilli of typhus. Even had we possessed the necessary science at our finger-tips, we could not have done much, unaided by the authorities; but when the authorities were as ignorant as ourselves,--I cannot believe their neglect of us was intentional,--we were simply doomed! Every morning, the wagons came to the hospital and dead-house, to take away the bodies; and I saw the corpses rolled in their blankets, taken to the vehicles, and piled one upon another, as the New Zealand frozen-mutton carcases are carted from the docks! The statistics of Andersonville are believed to show that the South was even more callous towards their prisoners than the authorities of Camp Douglas were. I admit that we were better fed than the Union prisoners were, and against Colonel Milligan and Mr. Shipman I have not a single accusation to make. It was the age that was brutally senseless, and heedlessly cruel. It was lavish and wasteful of life, and had not the least idea of
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
t military movement, by which those who were in the British service were rescued from a position of great peril. Most truly yours, George Grey. The Rt. Hon. Sir George Grey, K. C. B., Soldier, Explorer, Administrator, Statesman, Thinker, and Dreamer, to quote James Milne, was born in 1812, and died in 1898. He was buried in St. Paul's Cathedral, being accorded a public funeral. Governor of South Australia, when twenty-nine, he was subsequently twice Governor, and, later, Premier, of New Zealand; appointed as the first Governor of Cape Colony, 1854-59, Sir George Grey, by a daring assumption of personal responsibility, probably saved India, as Lord Malmesbury said, by diverting to India British troops meant for China, and also despatching re-enforcements from the Cape — the first to reach India — on the outbreak of the Mutiny. He was active in English public life in 1868-70, and in Australian affairs in 1870-94 (Milne's Romance of a Proconsul). Referring to Sir George Grey's ma
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.24 (search)
Majesty, I said. I have a big task on hand for you, when you are ready, were his last words. In October, 1891, we left England for a visit to Australia, New Zealand, and Tasmania, travelling via Brindisi, some twelve miles from which our train came into collision with a goods train. Stanley thus describes the accident:-- ndismayed. I here give a letter from Sir George Grey, written a month later: Auckland, 29th Jan., 1892. my dear Stanley,--This is the 52nd Anniversary of New Zealand, a public holiday. I am left in perfect tranquillity, with full time for calm reflection, for all are gone on some party of pleasure. I have occupied my moryou with this long letter. I hope we shall meet again before long, but I fear some time may elapse before I can start for England. I feel that I owe duties to New Zealand, Australia, and the Cape, and, until I have at least partially fulfilled them, I hesitate to indulge my longing once more to revisit my early home, and my many
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Notes on African travel, etc. (search)
ish were in possession of South Africa before either diamonds or gold were found. Nay, England herself was thought by the Romans to produce nothing but sloes! New Zealand was supposed to be destitute of anything but timber. Australia has been frequently contemptuously alluded to. The Congo possesses splendid inland navigation-lines, timber for furniture and ship-building. All this could have belonged to Great Britain, but was refused. Alas! The Duke of Wellington replied to the New Zealand Association, in 1838, that Great Britain had sufficient colonies, even though New Zealand might become a jewel in England's colonial crown! On General GordNew Zealand might become a jewel in England's colonial crown! On General Gordon. 1892 I have often wondered at Gordon; in his place I should have acted differently. It was optional with Gordon to live or die; he preferred to die; I should have lived, if only to get the better of the Mahdi. With joy of striving, and fierce delight of thwarting, I should have dogged and harassed the Mahdi, like Nemes
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
Mtesa, 311-313, 317, 318, 405. Murchison, Sir, Roderick, 267, 282. My Early Travels and Adventures, 225, 245. Myers, F. W. H., quoted, 289. Napier, Sir, Robert, 229. National School at Brynford, 44, 47-51. Nelson, mate on board the Windermere, 70, 75, 76, 80. Nelson, Captain, 354, 383, 387, 390. New Orleans, Stanley's life at, 81-125; later visit to, 426, 427. New York, Stanley's impressions of, 425. New York Herald, Stanley becomes correspondent of, 228-230. New Zealand, Stanley visits, 434-437. Newspapers, Stanley reads, in the wilds of Africa, 252-255; the scavenger-beetles of, 288; thoughts on reading the, 527. Ngalyema and the fetish, 339-342. Nile, the, Stanley's discoveries regarding the sources of, 301, 371, 405. North-Welsh, the, 52. Norwich, 452. Odessa, Stanley at, 247. O'Kelly, James J., 468, 469, 471, 472. Owen, Hicks, 18. Owen, Mary, aunt of Stanley, 42-57, 207, 208. Owen, Moses, 41-51. Parke, Surgeon, joins the ex
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morrill, Justin Smith 1810- (search)
wool as well as cloth. All of our people are now free to labor where they choose, where they can earn the most and receive the highest reward; and the man who to-day works on the farm may to-morrow, if he pleases, find employment in the mine, mill, or factory, and obtain the customary wages awarded to like skill and service. Protection turns out not merely good work, but the best. Local competition always pushes the best to the front. American locomotives are received in Australia, New Zealand, South America, and elsewhere, as equal to any in the world, and as cheap. Some British manufacturers and traders stamp their cotton goods with American trade-marks, because similar American goods, wherever known, fetch the highest price. Housefurnishing and saddlery, hardware, locks, joiners' tools, watches, silverware, jewelry, paper of all kinds, and many other articles of American manufacture are often both superior to and cheaper than similar articles produced abroad. Our agricult
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Single tax, (search)
le, as in telegraphs, railroads, water and gas supplies, etc., such business becomes a proper social function, which should be controlled and managed by and for the whole people concerned, through their proper government, local, State, or national, as may be. The single-tax adherents are at present far better organized as an aggressive force in England than in the United States. There the issue is brought prominently and persistently to the front, both in Parliament and elsewhere. In New Zealand, perhaps, the greatest advance has been made in the application of laws that have a genuine bearing upon the doctrine. These laws, of comparatively recent enactment, are looked upon by single-taxers as the entering wedge, and the experiment is being watched with great interest. Single-tax measures are also being considered in several of our State legislatures, notably in Colorado. Of the Anti-poverty Society, a remarkable association which held its first meeting in Chickering Hall,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Submarine cables. (search)
egraph Co 16 6,154 West India and Panama Telegraph Co 24 4,639 Grand total328 160,842 Cables operated by Nations. Nation.Number of Cables.Length of Cable in Nautical Miles. Austria41 214 Belgium 2 55 Denmark73 235 France54 5,035 Germany58 2,225 Great Britain and Ireland135 1,989 Greece46 55 Holland24 62 Italy 39 1,061 Norway325 324 Portugal4115 Russia 9231 Spain15 1,744 Sweden14 96 Switzerland2 10 Turkey23 344 Argentine Republic and Brazil49 119 Australia and New Zealand31 345 Bahama Islands1 213 British America1 200 British India (Indo-European Telegraph Department)111 1,919 China2 113 Cochin China and Tonquin2 774 Japan70 1,508 Macao1 2 Nouvelle Caledonie1 1 Netherlands Indies7 891 Senegal, Africa—Dakar to Goree Island1 3 —————— Total1,141 19,883 On Sept. 23, 1901, the Commercial Pacific Company was incorporated in Albany, N. Y., for the purpose of laying a submarine cable from San Francisco to Manila, the line to touch H
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