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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.13 (search)
llowing a few of the bacilli of typhus. Even had we possessed the necessary science at our finger-tips, we could not have done much, unaided by the authorities; but when the authorities were as ignorant as ourselves,--I cannot believe their neglect of us was intentional,--we were simply doomed! Every morning, the wagons came to the hospital and dead-house, to take away the bodies; and I saw the corpses rolled in their blankets, taken to the vehicles, and piled one upon another, as the New Zealand frozen-mutton carcases are carted from the docks! The statistics of Andersonville are believed to show that the South was even more callous towards their prisoners than the authorities of Camp Douglas were. I admit that we were better fed than the Union prisoners were, and against Colonel Milligan and Mr. Shipman I have not a single accusation to make. It was the age that was brutally senseless, and heedlessly cruel. It was lavish and wasteful of life, and had not the least idea of
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
t military movement, by which those who were in the British service were rescued from a position of great peril. Most truly yours, George Grey. The Rt. Hon. Sir George Grey, K. C. B., Soldier, Explorer, Administrator, Statesman, Thinker, and Dreamer, to quote James Milne, was born in 1812, and died in 1898. He was buried in St. Paul's Cathedral, being accorded a public funeral. Governor of South Australia, when twenty-nine, he was subsequently twice Governor, and, later, Premier, of New Zealand; appointed as the first Governor of Cape Colony, 1854-59, Sir George Grey, by a daring assumption of personal responsibility, probably saved India, as Lord Malmesbury said, by diverting to India British troops meant for China, and also despatching re-enforcements from the Cape — the first to reach India — on the outbreak of the Mutiny. He was active in English public life in 1868-70, and in Australian affairs in 1870-94 (Milne's Romance of a Proconsul). Referring to Sir George Grey's ma
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.24 (search)
Majesty, I said. I have a big task on hand for you, when you are ready, were his last words. In October, 1891, we left England for a visit to Australia, New Zealand, and Tasmania, travelling via Brindisi, some twelve miles from which our train came into collision with a goods train. Stanley thus describes the accident:-- ndismayed. I here give a letter from Sir George Grey, written a month later: Auckland, 29th Jan., 1892. my dear Stanley,--This is the 52nd Anniversary of New Zealand, a public holiday. I am left in perfect tranquillity, with full time for calm reflection, for all are gone on some party of pleasure. I have occupied my moryou with this long letter. I hope we shall meet again before long, but I fear some time may elapse before I can start for England. I feel that I owe duties to New Zealand, Australia, and the Cape, and, until I have at least partially fulfilled them, I hesitate to indulge my longing once more to revisit my early home, and my many
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Notes on African travel, etc. (search)
ish were in possession of South Africa before either diamonds or gold were found. Nay, England herself was thought by the Romans to produce nothing but sloes! New Zealand was supposed to be destitute of anything but timber. Australia has been frequently contemptuously alluded to. The Congo possesses splendid inland navigation-lines, timber for furniture and ship-building. All this could have belonged to Great Britain, but was refused. Alas! The Duke of Wellington replied to the New Zealand Association, in 1838, that Great Britain had sufficient colonies, even though New Zealand might become a jewel in England's colonial crown! On General GordNew Zealand might become a jewel in England's colonial crown! On General Gordon. 1892 I have often wondered at Gordon; in his place I should have acted differently. It was optional with Gordon to live or die; he preferred to die; I should have lived, if only to get the better of the Mahdi. With joy of striving, and fierce delight of thwarting, I should have dogged and harassed the Mahdi, like Nemes
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
Mtesa, 311-313, 317, 318, 405. Murchison, Sir, Roderick, 267, 282. My Early Travels and Adventures, 225, 245. Myers, F. W. H., quoted, 289. Napier, Sir, Robert, 229. National School at Brynford, 44, 47-51. Nelson, mate on board the Windermere, 70, 75, 76, 80. Nelson, Captain, 354, 383, 387, 390. New Orleans, Stanley's life at, 81-125; later visit to, 426, 427. New York, Stanley's impressions of, 425. New York Herald, Stanley becomes correspondent of, 228-230. New Zealand, Stanley visits, 434-437. Newspapers, Stanley reads, in the wilds of Africa, 252-255; the scavenger-beetles of, 288; thoughts on reading the, 527. Ngalyema and the fetish, 339-342. Nile, the, Stanley's discoveries regarding the sources of, 301, 371, 405. North-Welsh, the, 52. Norwich, 452. Odessa, Stanley at, 247. O'Kelly, James J., 468, 469, 471, 472. Owen, Hicks, 18. Owen, Mary, aunt of Stanley, 42-57, 207, 208. Owen, Moses, 41-51. Parke, Surgeon, joins the ex