Your search returned 20 results in 13 document sections:

1 2
arefully watched the accounts written by different correspondents thus far, and am utterly surprised at the vagueness of some, the falsity of others, and the imperfection of all. The battles of Winchester were of no small moment, deciding as they did the fate of the Great Valley, as well as the fate of Western Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. Could Winchester and neighboring towns have still been held in spite of the desperate courage and efforts of the enemy, Martinsburgh and Cumberland, Pennsylvania and Maryland, the railroads, canals, and public buildings would have been likewise secure. How immense the stakes we were playing for at Winchester! Then it is important as a matter of public interest and historic record that the true history of the whole matter be published. The skirmishing in front of our works opened the ball on Friday evening, June twelfth. Saturday morning it was resumed, and kept up hotly all day, the enemy still showing themselves, in small force only, in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davis, John W., 1799-1859 (search)
Davis, John W., 1799-1859 Statesman; born in Cumberland county, Pa., July 17, 1799; graduated at the Baltimore Medical College in 1821; settled in Carlisle, Ind., in 1823; member of Congress in 1835-37, 1839-41, and 1843-47; speaker of the House of Representatives during his last term; United States commissioner to China in 1848-50; and governor of Oregon in 1853-54. He was president of the convention in 1852 which nominated Franklin Pierce for President. He died in Carlisle, Ind., Aug. 22, 1859.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnson, John 1806-1879 (search)
Johnson, John 1806-1879 Educator; born in Bristol, Me., Aug. 23, 1806; graduated at Bowdoin College in 1832; Professor of Natural Sciences at Wesleyan University in 1837-73, when he was made professor emeritus. He was the author of A history of the towns of Bristol and Bremen in the State of Maine, etc. He died in Clifton, S. I., Dec. 2, 1879. Indian agent; born in Ballyshannon, Ireland, in March, 1775; came to the United States in 1786 and settled in Cumberland county, Pa. He participated in the campaign against the Indians in Ohio in 1792-93; was agent of Indian affairs for thirty-one years; served in the War of 1812, becoming quartermaster. In 1841-42 he was commissioner to arrange with the Indians of Ohio for their emigration from that district. He was the author of an Account of the Indian tribes of Ohio. He died in Washington, D. C., April 19, 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Peffer, William Alfred 1831- (search)
Peffer, William Alfred 1831- Legislator; born in Cumberland county, Pa., Sept. 10, 1831; enlisted as a private in the 83d Illinois Infantry in 1862; mustered out in 1865 with the rank of lieutenant; then removed to Kansas and established the Fredonia Journal. He was elected to the State Senate in 1874; to the United States Senate in 1891; and was the unsuccessful candidate for governor of Kansas in 1898 on the Prohibition ticket. See imperialism; people's party.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rupp, Israel Daniel 1803-1878 (search)
Rupp, Israel Daniel 1803-1878 Historian; born in Cumberland county, Pa., July 10, 1803; was author of History of religious denominations in the United States; Events in Indian history; Collection of names of thirty thousand German and other immigrants to Pennsylvania from 1727–; 76; and of many Pennsylvania county histories. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., May 31, 187
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Social Democracy of America, the (search)
he State or Territory, and to organize that according to the principles of the Social Democracy, so far as the Constitution of the United States may permit. Immediately after the publication of the Social Democracy's plan, the governor of the State of Washington, J. R. Rogers, invited the society to take into consideration the advantages possessed by that State for such colonies, but later it was announced from Washington that Col. Richard J. Hinton, chairman of the Social Democracy's colonization commission, had signed papers by which title to 350,000 acres of land in Cumberland and Fentrass counties, Tenn., was transferred to the society. Col. Hinton said that the Tennessee colony would be the first organized and that colonies would be settled in Idaho and Washington next. The Tennessee lands cost $1,750,000; the Kentucky Trust Company supplied the commission with the money, accepting the commission's bonds for $2,000,000, which left a margin of $250,000 with which to begin work.
ppointed to determine and settle, according to the Jay treaty, what river was the St. Croix, made a report that the mouth of the river is in Passamaquoddy Bay, in lat. 45° 5′ 5″ N., and long. 67° 12′ 30″ W. of London, and 3° 54′ 15″ E. of Harvard College, and that the boundary of Maine was up this river and the Cheputnatecook to a marked stake called the Monument ......Oct. 25, 1798 Kennebec county erected from north part of Lincoln......Feb. 20, 1799 Northern parts of York and Cumberland counties erected into the county of Oxford......March 4, 1805 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow born in Portland......Feb. 27, 1807 County of Somerset established from the northerly part of Kennebec......March 1, 1809 Three commissioners appointed by governor and council to act on land titles in Lincoln county......Feb. 27, 1811 Boxer, a British brig of eighteen guns and 104 men, Captain Blyth, engages the American brig Enterprise, sixteen guns and 102 men, Captain Burrows, off P
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
nth sessions of the Continental Congress met in New York City—that is, from Jan. 11, 1785, to Oct. 21, 1788. Also the first and second sessions of the First Congress under the Constitution......March 4, 1789–Aug. 12, 1790 Phelps & Gorham sell to Robert Morris 1,204,000 acres in western New York for 8d. an acre......1 790 Boundary between New York and Vermont established......1790 Congress leaves New York City and meets in Philadelphia......December, 1790 Part of Vermont formed Cumberland and Gloucester counties in New York till ......1791 Paper mill erected at Troy, which makes from four to five reams of paper daily......1791 French privateer fitted out in New York is seized by militia by order of Governor Clinton......June 14, 1791 Frederick William Augustus, Baron Steuben, major-general in the Revolutionary army dies at Steubenville, Oneida county......Nov. 28, 1794 Union College incorporated at Schenectady......1795 George Clinton, after eighteen years se
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Watts, Frederick 1719- (search)
Watts, Frederick 1719- Military officer; born in Wales, June 1, 1719; emigrated to the United States and settled in Cumberland county, Pa., in 1760. He served in the Revolutionary War as lieutenant-colonel, and had command of the battalion that was assigned to Cumberland county. At the surrender of Fort Washington this division was captured. After his exchange he was made a justice of the peace; a representative in the Assembly in 1779; sub-lieutenant of Cumberland county in 1780; commisd in the Revolutionary War as lieutenant-colonel, and had command of the battalion that was assigned to Cumberland county. At the surrender of Fort Washington this division was captured. After his exchange he was made a justice of the peace; a representative in the Assembly in 1779; sub-lieutenant of Cumberland county in 1780; commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers in 1782; and was a member of the supreme executive council in 1787-90. He died on his farm on Juniata River, Oct. 3, 1795.
e expense of the inhabitants by the illegal authority of a military chief, was the great result of the campaign. Yet native courage flashed up in every part of the colonies. The false Delawares, thirsting for victims and secret as the night, from their village at Kittanning, within forty-five miles of Fort Duquesne, stained all the border of Pennsylvania with murder and scalping. To destroy them, three hundred Pennsylvanians crossed the Alleghanies, conducted by John Armstrong, of Cumberland County, famed as inheriting the courage of the Scottish covenanters. In the night following the seventh of September, the avenging party, having marched on that day thirty miles through the unbroken forests, were guided to the Indian village of Kittanning, by the beating of a drum and the whooping of warriors at their festival; and they lay quiet and hush till the moon was fairly set. They heard a young fellow whistling near them, as a signal to a squaw after his dance was over; and in a f
1 2