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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 7: the return of the Army. (search)
people had been many and close. And we had made our rule of conduct towards each other such as was befitting those who were to live together as fellow-citizens in peace and good will. On one of those last fair April mornings I received a formal visit from a deputation whose personal appearance, bearing, and manner wore a solemnity almost religious in suggestion, but betokening high character and sincere purpose. They announce themselves as a delegation appointed by the citizens of Dinwiddie County to tender me a public dinner in testimony of what they were pleased to characterize as judicious management and kindly spirit in dealing with the confused elements and powers of that difficult situation. While a certain incongruity between the spiritual motive and the material constituence of their proffer might be conducive to a smile, yet there were elements in its seriousness which commanded sentiments even deeper than respect. However much their approving feeling may have overpass
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XLIX. April, 1865 (search)
XLIX. April, 1865 Rumors of battles. excitement in the churches. the South side Road captured by the enemy. evacuation of Richmond. surrender of Gen. Lee. occupation of Richmond by Federal forces. address to the people of Virginia by J. A. Campbell and others. assassination of President Lincoln. April 1 Clear and pleasant. Walked to the department. We have vague and incoherent accounts from excited couriers of fighting, without result, in Dinwiddie County, near the South Side Railroad. It is rumored that a battle will probably occur in that vicinity to-day. I have leave of absence, to improve my health; and propose accompanying my daughter Anne, next week, to Mr. Hobson's mansion in Goochland County. The Hobsons are opulent, and she will have an excellent asylum there, if the vicissitudes of the war do not spoil her calculations. I shall look for angling streams: and if successful, hope for both sport and better health. The books at the consc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pryor, Roger Atkinson 1828- (search)
Pryor, Roger Atkinson 1828- Jurist; born in Dinwiddie county, Va., July 19, 1828; graduated at Hampden-Sydney College in 1845, and at the University of Virginia in 1848; became a lawyer and editor, and an advocate of State supremacy. In 1854 he was a special commissioner to Greece, and in 1859 was elected to Congress. He was an advocate of secession; went to South Carolina early in 1861; was on the staff of Beauregard in the attack upon Fort Sumter in April; was commissioned a brigadier-general and led a division in the battles before Richmond in 1862, and resigned in 1863. He was a member of the Confederate Congress in 1862; and was captured and confined in Fort Lafayette in 1864. After the war he urged loyalty to the government; in 1865 removed to New York City to practise law; and became a justice of the Supreme Court of New York.
n were in a great measure due to the extreme numerical inferiority of the Confederate cavalry to that of the enemy. The distribution of our cavalry at this time in Virginia is a curious study and excites criticism. Only two brigades of cavalry were sent to the Valley by Gen. Lee. Gen. Grant sent two large divisions of three brigades each. At Petersburg and Richmond, the numbers of our cavalry exceeded those of the enemy. But unfortunately, the country in this vicinity (especially in Dinwiddie county) was but little adapted for this superiority to be displayed, it being very wooded and traversed only by narrow roads. Grant had Gregg's division of two brigades on his left flank on the south side of the James-and four regiments under Kautz on the north side, guarding his right flank. Confronting Kautz, the Confederates had Gary's brigade, and opposite to Gregg, Butler's division (Hampton's old command) of three brigades, W. I. F. Lee's division, of two brigades, and a detached bri
. 10, 1711: Died at Menotomy, the wife of Mr. William Cutler of that place, aged 48 years. She was the Mother of 36 children; but the; 35th was the only one that survived to follow her to the grave. This account seems incredible. The records slow, however, that she had a large number of children, all of whom died young, except one. The survivor of this numerous progeny, William, b. 23 Dec. 1764, grad. H. C. 1786, was a physician, resided in Virginia more than thirty years, and d. in Dinwiddie Co. 17 May 1836, a. 71. By the second w. Mr. Cutler had James, b. 12 May 1774, a printer in Boston, 1817; Rebecca, b. Jan. 1777, d. 6 Aug. 1778; Rebecca, b. 22 Dec. 1779, m. John Tufts 13 Dec. 1798. William the f. d. of dropsy 1 Ap. 1781; his w. Rebecca survived, and in 1817, by reason of old age, was placed under the guardianship of her son James. 11. Robert, S. of James (7), grad. H. C. 1741, was ordained at Epping, N. H., in 1747, dismissed in 1755, installed at Greenwich, Mass., 13
. 10, 1711: Died at Menotomy, the wife of Mr. William Cutler of that place, aged 48 years. She was the Mother of 36 children; but the; 35th was the only one that survived to follow her to the grave. This account seems incredible. The records slow, however, that she had a large number of children, all of whom died young, except one. The survivor of this numerous progeny, William, b. 23 Dec. 1764, grad. H. C. 1786, was a physician, resided in Virginia more than thirty years, and d. in Dinwiddie Co. 17 May 1836, a. 71. By the second w. Mr. Cutler had James, b. 12 May 1774, a printer in Boston, 1817; Rebecca, b. Jan. 1777, d. 6 Aug. 1778; Rebecca, b. 22 Dec. 1779, m. John Tufts 13 Dec. 1798. William the f. d. of dropsy 1 Ap. 1781; his w. Rebecca survived, and in 1817, by reason of old age, was placed under the guardianship of her son James. 11. Robert, S. of James (7), grad. H. C. 1741, was ordained at Epping, N. H., in 1747, dismissed in 1755, installed at Greenwich, Mass., 13
General Tracy, fell near the front line, pierced through the breast, and instantly died without uttering a word. His remains were sent to Macon, Ga., and there interred. Both Georgia and Alabama cherish his memory with pride. He was the type of an accomplished, knightly, Southern gentleman. His wife was a daughter of Capt. George Steele, of Madison county. Major-General Jones M. Withers was born in Madison county, Ala., January 12, 1814. His father, John Withers, a native of Dinwiddie county, Va., was a planter and gentleman of culture. His mother was also a Virginia lady-Miss Jones, of Brunswick county. He attended the Greene academy in Huntsville, and at the age of seventeen was appointed, by President Jackson, a cadet at West Point. There he graduated, in 1835, as brevet second lieutenant, and served at Fort Leavenworth. In December of the same year he resigned and returned to his home; but he served, during the hostilities with the Creeks in 1836, on the staff of Maj.
around General Tyler were representatives of Tennessee, Georgia and other States, imperfectly armed and organized at a moment's notice; the garrison lost 48 killed and wounded; the shots were received in the head, showing that the men did not take cover; it was the last fight east of the great river; it was a brave one, and a memorial stone should mark the place where Tyler and his heroes fell. Brigadier-General Alfred J. Vaughan Brigadier-General Alfred J. Vaughan was born in Dinwiddie county, Va., May 10, 1830, and was graduated at the Virginia military institute, July 4, 1851, as senior captain of cadets. He adopted civil engineering as his profession, and going West located at St. Joseph, Mo. Afterward he was deputy United States surveyor for the district of California. Returning east, he settled in Marshall county, Miss. He was very much opposed to the dissolution of the Union, but when his adopted State, Mississippi, and his native State, Virginia, declared for secess
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Itinerary of the Fourth Virginia cavalry. March 27th-April 9th, 1865. (search)
on of General Johnston could only convince him of the futility of further resistance.] Monday, March 27th. Left Mechanicsville; camped for the night in Chesterfield county between Richmond and Petersburg. Tuesday, March 28th. Went to Dinwiddie county, and camped for the night at Sutherland's Tavern. Wednesday, March 29th. Laid in line of battle near Hatcher's creek, Payne's Brigade fighting, we supporting him; camped for the night near Hatcher's creek. Thursday, March 30th. Movedy driven by enemy at Five Forks; camped for the night at——Station on Southside Railroad. Saturday, April 1st. Enemy pressing us all day, especially in the afternoon; succeeded in checking him at Mulberry Inn, near the line of Amelia and Dinwiddie counties; remained in breastworks here all night. Enemy charged in several times—repulsed. Sunday, April 2d. We left about daybreak; went three or four miles and remained until about 10 o'clock A. M. Enemy appeared, drove in picket, closely pre<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Thanksgiving service on the Virginia, March 10, 1862. (search)
ertained the gentlemen with an account of the visit of the Virginia delegation in Congress to Secretary-of-War Breckinridge in his office at the War Department. General Breckinridge said that General Robert E. Leel had written to President Davis stating that he only had on his rolls about forty-six thousand men fit for duty; that General Grant's forces were of such superiority in numbers that he could make a united attack along his (Lee's) entire line from Richmond to his right flank in Dinwiddie county and yet have a sufficient force to turn his flank and attack his rear. These considerations made one of two things imperative—either to have reinforcements or retire with his army from the State of Virginia and surrender the Confederate capital. How matters stood. As to reinforcements the Secretary explained that the transMis-sissippi troops refused to leave their State. Louisiana was in possession of the enemy and no aid could be expected from that quarter, and Governor Brown,
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