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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
n possession of the post. The garrison not only made no resistance out an eye-witness declared, that when the State flag of Alabama v. as unfurled, in place of the National flag that had been pulled down, they cheered it. It was a bloodless conquest. One of the insurgents, writing at the fort that morning, said:--We found here about five thousand shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the Government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, was taken possession of by the insurgents at the same time; and, on the same morning, the revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to T. Sandford, the Collector of the Port of Mobile, by Commander Morrison. On the 9th, five companies of volunteers left Montgomery for Pensacola, at the request of the Governor of Florida, to assist the insurgents of that State in the seizure of the forts and Navy Yard. These formed a part of the force to whom Armstrong surrendered
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
e, about five thousand strong, sent by General Canby from New Orleans, under General Gordon Granger, was planted upon Dauphin Island for the purpose of co-operating. the entrance to Mobile Bay is divided by Dauphin Island, making two passages; theDauphin Island, making two passages; the easterly one four miles wide and Twenty-five feet deep in the channel. The other, known as Grant's Pass, was a very narrow passage, between two little islands, and not more than five or six feet deep at low water. On one of the little islands, andddressed himself, after sending the wounded of both parties to Pensacola, on the Metacomet. General Granger was on Dauphin Island, and had begun the siege of Fort Gaines. Farragut sent August 6. the Chickasaw to help him. She shelled the Fort witrial came, and he met it with less honor than did Anderson. Granger's troops were transferred August 9, 1864. from Dauphin Island to the rear of Fort Morgan, and there lines of investment were constructed across the narrow sand-spit. When every t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
a travel of over thirteen hundred miles in the space of eleven days. There the corps remained awhile, waiting for the perfection of the arrangements for the expedition under Wilson, The Twenty-ninth and Thirty-third Iowa, Fiftieth Indiana, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fifth Wisconsin, and Seventy-seventh Ohio. which was to sweep down from the north, through Alabama, simultaneously with Canby's attack on Mobile. The corps finally moved again, and arrived at Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, on the 7th of March, where a siege train was organized, *consisting of seven batteries of the First Indiana Artillery, two of the Sixth Michigan, and one of Mack's Eighteenth New York. The cavalry marched overland from New Orleans. At the middle of March, every thing was in readiness for an attack on Mobile, with from twenty-five thousand to thirty thousand troops, composed of the Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps, Knipe's cavalry division, and a brigade of cavalry, a division of infantr
ar-admiral Farragut. headquarters, Fort Gaines, August 7, 1864. To Admiral Farragut, Commanding Naval Forces off Dauphin Island: Feeling my inability to maintain my present position longer than you may see fit to open upon me with the fleet, e surrender of Fort Gaines, I have to say that, after communicating with General Granger, in command of our forces on Dauphin Island, the only offers we can make are-- First. The unconditional surrender of yourself and the garrison of Fort Gainesaines should be the first invested, engaging to have a force in the sound ready to protect the landing of the army on Dauphin Island in the rear of that fort, and I assigned Lieutenant Commander De Krafft, of the Conemaugh, to that duty. On the fimseh was not ready. General Granger, however, to my mortification, was up to time, and the troops actually landed on Dauphin Island. As subsequent events proved, the delay turned to our advantage, as the rebels were busily engaged during the four
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
ter the battle of Mobile Bay This splendid picture shows the calm and finely-molded features of the great admiral just after the accomplishment of a feat which save in bravery o'er-topped his great achievement of the passage of the forts below New Orleans. There Farragut had done what was pronounced impossible, but at Mobile he had fought his way through dangers ten times more formidable. Here, with the modesty which ever characterized him, he sits within the captured Fort Gaines on Dauphin Island, discussing with General Gordon Granger plans for the combined attack by which Fort Morgan was taken on August 22, 1864. It was to Granger that Mobile finally surrendered. passed between them, and made for the Oneida, which was not under steerageway. It was at this exciting moment that the monitors drew up, and the Winnebago, forging ahead, took her position between the ram and her seemingly helpless prey. The Federal vessels had been hampered, in a measure, by being lashed side b
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
000. The population in 1890 was 1,118,587; in 1900, 1,381,625. In October, 1698, King William sent three ships to take possession of the Mississippi River, and prepare for planting a colony of French Protestants on its borders. Nothing came of it. In the same month Iberville and others sailed for the same river, and planted the seeds of French dominion there. The first settlement in Louisiana was made at Biloxi (now in Mississippi) in 1699. In 1702 there were settlements begun on Dauphin Island and at Mobile, now in Alabama. The French government, wishing to promote more rapid settlements in that region, granted (1712) the whole province, with a monopoly of trade, to Anthony Crozat, a wealthy French merchant, who expected large profits from mines and trade with Mexico. Crozat contracted to send ships from France, with goods and emigrants, every year; and he was entitled to import a cargo of negro slaves annually. The French government also agreed to pay $10,000 a year for th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mobile, Ala. (search)
et of eighteen vessels, four of them iron-clad, while a co-operating land force, 5,000 strong, under Gen. Gordon Granger (q. v.), was sent from New Orleans to Dauphin Island. Farragut entered the bay Aug. 5, 1864. That entrance is divided into two passages by Dauphin Island. On the eastern side of this island was Fort Gaines, cDauphin Island. On the eastern side of this island was Fort Gaines, commanding the main entrance; and southeasterly from it was Fort Morgan, a still stronger work, with a light-house near it. These forts the Confederates had well earned and manned, and within the bay lay a Confederate flotilla under Admiral Buchanan. His flag-ship was the Tennessee, a powerful ram, and it was accompanied by thrinent cavalry leader, under the direction of General Thomas. Early in 1865 Gen. A. J. Smith's corps joined Canby at New Orleans, Feb. 21. That corps went to Dauphin Island, at the entrance to Mobile Bay, where a siege-train was organized, consisting of ten batteries. Knipe's cavalry, attached to the corps, marched overland from
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of (search)
Forts Morgan and Gaines, seizure of On the night of Jan. 3, 1861, Col. J. B. Todd, under orders of Governor Moore, embarked on a steamboat, with four companies of Confederate volunteers, for Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. They reached the fort at about 3 A. M. the next-day. The garrison made no resistance, and cheered the flag of Alabama when it was put in the place of that of the United States. At 5 A. M. the fort was in the hands of the Confederates. One of the captors wrote: We found here about 5,000 shot and shell; and we are ready to receive any distinguished strangers the government may see fit to send on a visit to us. Fort Gaines, on Dauphin Island, opposite Fort Morgan, shared the fate of the latter. That morning, Jan. 4, the United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to the collector of the port of Mobile (q. v.). See Bowyer, Fort.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Alabama, 1865 (search)
h, 21st and 26th Indpt. Batteries; Light Arty.; 161st and 178th Infantry. OHIO--17th Indpt. Battery, Light Arty.; 72nd, 77th, 83rd, 95th, 96th and 114th Infantry. TENNESSEE--4th Cavalry. WISCONSIN--4th Cavalry; 8th, 11th, 14th, 20th, 23rd, 27th, 28th, 29th, 33rd and 35th Infantry. UNITED STATES--47th, 48th, 50th, 51st, 68th, 73rd, 76th, 82nd, 86th, 96th and 97th Colored Infantry. VERMONT--7th Infantry. Union loss, 232 killed, 1403 wounded, 43 missing. Total, 1678. March 18-22: Exp. from Dauphin Island to Fowl River NarrowsILLINOIS--72d and 95th Infantry. MISSOURI--44th Infantry. WISCONSIN--33d Infantry. March 22-April 24: Raid from Chickasaw to Selma, Ala.,, and Macon, Ga. (Wilson's)ILLINOIS--Chicago Board of Trade Battery Light Arty.; 98th and 123d Mounted Infantry. INDIANA--2d and 4th Cavalry; 18th Battery Light Arty.; 17th and 72d Mounted Infantry. IOWA--3d, 4th, 5th and 8th Cavalry. KENTUCKY--4th, 6th and 7th Cavalry; 4th Mounted Infantry. MICHIGAN--2d and 4th Cavalry. OHIO--1st,
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
. Moved to Kenner, La., January 1-5, 1865. To Dauphin Island, Ala., February 4-7. Operations against Mobile, Ala., ement to New Orleans, La., February 8-26; thence to Dauphin Island, Ala., March 6. Campaign against Mobile and its defensand its defenses March 17-April 12. Expedition from Dauphin Island to Fowl River Narrows March 18-22. Siege of Spanisht 21, 1864. Moved to New Orleans, La.; thence to Dauphin Island, Ala., February 28-March 16. Operations against Mobileuary, 1865. Moved to New Orleans, La.; thence to Dauphin Island, Ala., February 9-March 3. Campaign against Mobile and Movement to New Orleans, La., February 8-26. To Dauphin Island March 6. Campaign against Mobile and its defenses Mement to New Orleans, La., February 9-21; thence to Dauphin Island, Ala., March 6. Campaign against Mobile and its defenso New Orleans, La., February 25-27, 1865; thence to Dauphin Island, Ala., March 11-16. Canby's Campaign against Mobile, A
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