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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. George Fenner to Guinie, and the Islands of Cape Verde, in the yeere of 1566. with three ships, to wit, the Admirall called the Castle of Comfort, the May Flower, and the George, and a Pinnasse also: Written by Walter Wren. (search)
y of April we tooke in water at the Island of Flores, and having ankered, our cable was fretted in sunder with a rocke and so burst, where wee lost that cable and anker also, and so departed to our coast. Then wee set sayle to an Islande named Faial , about the which lie three other Islands, the one called Pico , the other Saint George, and the other Graciosa , which we had sight of on the eight and twentieth day. The 29 we came to an anker in the Southwest side of Faial in a faire bay, aFaial in a faire bay, and 22 fadom water against a litle towne where we had both fresh water and fresh victuall. In this Island by the report of the inhabitants, there groweth certaine greene woad, which by their speeches is farre better then the woad of S. Michael or of Tercera. The 8 day of May we came to Tercera where we met with a Portugall ship, and being desititute of a cable and anker, our Generall caused us to keepe her companie, to see if she could conveniently spare us any. The next morning we might see b
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voiage of the right honorable George Erle of Cumberland to the Azores , &c. Written by the excellent Mathematician and Enginier master Edward Wright. (search)
even therewith, appeared hard by a head of us, the sea breaking upon his backe, which was blacke coloured, in such sort as deeming at the first it had beene a rocke, and the ship stemming directly with him, we were put in a sudden feare for the time: till soone after we saw him move out of the way. The 16 of September in the night it lightened much, whereupon there followed great winds and raine, which continued the 17 18 19 20 and 21 of the same. The 23 of September we came againe into Faial road to weigh an anker which (for haste and feare of foule weather) wee had left there before, where we went on shore to see the towne, the people (as we thought) having now setled themselves there againe, but notwithstanding many of them through too much distrustfulnesse, departed and prepared to depart with their packets at the first sight of us: untill such time as they were assured by my Lord, that our comming was not any way to injury them, but especially to have fresh water, and some o
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The firing and sinking of the stout and warre-like Carack called Las Cinque Llaguas, or, The five Wounds, by three tall Ships set foorth at the charges of the right honorable the Erle of Cumberland and his friends: Written by the discreet and valiant captaine M. Nicholas Downton. (search)
er was called Bras Carrero, and was captaine of a Carack which was cast away neere Mocambique , and came likewise in this ship for a passenger. Also three men of the inferior sort we saved in our boat, onely these two we clothed and brought into England. The rest which were taken up by the other ship boats, we set all on shore in the Ile of Flores, except some two or three Negros, whereof one was borne in Mocambique , and another in the East Indies. This fight was open off the Sound betweene Faial and Pico 6 leagues to the Southward. The people which we saved told us that the cause why they would not yeeld, was, because this Carack was for the king, and that she had all the goods belonging to the king in the countrey for that yeere in her, and that the captaine of her was in favour with the king, and at his returne into the Indies should have bene Viceroy there. And withall this ship was nothing at all pestered neither within boord nor without, and was more like a ship of warre then
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages and Navigations of the English nation to Virginia , and the severall discoveries therof chiefly at the charges of the honourable Sir Walter Ralegh knight, from 33 to 40 degrees of latitude: together with the successe of the English colonies there planted: as likewise a description of the Countrey, with the Inhabitants, and the manifold commodities. Whereunto are annexed the patents, letters, discourses, &c. to this part belonging. (search)
The 22. of September we went aboard the Raynebow, and towards night we spake with the Swift-sure, and gave him 3. pieces. The captaines desired our company; wherefore we willingly attended on them: who at this time with 10. other ships stood for Faial . But the Generall with the rest of the Fleete were separated from us, making two fleetes, for the surer meeting with the Spanish fleete. On Wednesday the 23. we saw Gratiosa, where the Admiral and the rest of the Queens fleete were come togethwhich was determined that the whole fleete should go for the mayne, and spred themselves on the coasts of Spaine and Portugal , so farre as conveniently they might, for the surer meeting of the Spanish fleete in those parts. The 26. we came to Faial , where the Admiral with some other of the fleete ankred, othersome plyed up and downe betweene that and the Pico untill midnight, at which time the Antony shot off a piece and weyed, shewing his light: after whom the whole fleete stood to the Ea
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fift voyage of M. John White into the West Indies and parts of America called Virginia , in the yeere 1590. (search)
The 22. of September we went aboard the Raynebow, and towards night we spake with the Swift-sure, and gave him 3. pieces. The captaines desired our company; wherefore we willingly attended on them: who at this time with 10. other ships stood for Faial . But the Generall with the rest of the Fleete were separated from us, making two fleetes, for the surer meeting with the Spanish fleete. On Wednesday the 23. we saw Gratiosa, where the Admiral and the rest of the Queens fleete were come togethwhich was determined that the whole fleete should go for the mayne, and spred themselves on the coasts of Spaine and Portugal , so farre as conveniently they might, for the surer meeting of the Spanish fleete in those parts. The 26. we came to Faial , where the Admiral with some other of the fleete ankred, othersome plyed up and downe betweene that and the Pico untill midnight, at which time the Antony shot off a piece and weyed, shewing his light: after whom the whole fleete stood to the Ea
The 22. of September we went aboard the Raynebow, and towards night we spake with the Swift-sure, and gave him 3. pieces. The captaines desired our company; wherefore we willingly attended on them: who at this time with 10. other ships stood for Faial . But the Generall with the rest of the Fleete were separated from us, making two fleetes, for the surer meeting with the Spanish fleete. On Wednesday the 23. we saw Gratiosa, where the Admiral and the rest of the Queens fleete were come togethwhich was determined that the whole fleete should go for the mayne, and spred themselves on the coasts of Spaine and Portugal , so farre as conveniently they might, for the surer meeting of the Spanish fleete in those parts. The 26. we came to Faial , where the Admiral with some other of the fleete ankred, othersome plyed up and downe betweene that and the Pico untill midnight, at which time the Antony shot off a piece and weyed, shewing his light: after whom the whole fleete stood to the Ea
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
ermuda , we discovered a monster in the sea, who shewed himselfe three times unto us from the middle upwards, in which parts hee was proportioned like a man, of the complection of a Mulato, or tawny Indian. The Generall did commaund one of his clearks to put it in writing, and hee certified the King and his Nobles thereof. Presently after this, for the space of sixteene dayes we had wonderful foule weather, and then God sent us a faire wind, untill such time as we discovered the Iland called Faial . On S. James day we made rackets, wheeles, and other fire-workes, to make pastime that night, as it is the order of the Spanyards. When we came neere the land, our master R. Barret conferred with us, to take the pinnesse one night, when we came on the Iland called Tercera, to free our selves from the danger and bondage that we were going into, whereunto we agreed; none had any pinnesse asterne then but our ship, which gave great courage to our enterprise: we prepared a bagge of bread, an
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The travailes of Job Hortop, which Sir John Hawkins set on land within the Bay of Mexico, after his departure from the Haven of S. John de Ullua in Nueva Espanna, the 8. of October 1568. (search)
ermuda , we discovered a monster in the sea, who shewed himselfe three times unto us from the middle upwards, in which parts hee was proportioned like a man, of the complection of a Mulato, or tawny Indian. The Generall did commaund one of his clearks to put it in writing, and hee certified the King and his Nobles thereof. Presently after this, for the space of sixteene dayes we had wonderful foule weather, and then God sent us a faire wind, untill such time as we discovered the Iland called Faial . On S. James day we made rackets, wheeles, and other fire-workes, to make pastime that night, as it is the order of the Spanyards. When we came neere the land, our master R. Barret conferred with us, to take the pinnesse one night, when we came on the Iland called Tercera, to free our selves from the danger and bondage that we were going into, whereunto we agreed; none had any pinnesse asterne then but our ship, which gave great courage to our enterprise: we prepared a bagge of bread, an
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
g Land, but seeing the Sea to breake, make account it is the rocks called las Hormigas. And if thou thinke good to goe to Faial , thou shalt goe till thou be in 38. degrees 1/2 scant, and then thou shalt goe East, and so shalt have sight of Faial . TFaial . The markes of it be these.* Comming out from Faial , and leaving all the Islandes, then all goe East and by South untill thou bring thy selfe in 37. degrees, which is the height of Cape Saint Vincent: and then goe East, and thou shalt see the CapeFaial , and leaving all the Islandes, then all goe East and by South untill thou bring thy selfe in 37. degrees, which is the height of Cape Saint Vincent: and then goe East, and thou shalt see the Cape having the markes aforesayd. And from Cape S. Vincent thou must goe East Southeast, till thou be Northeast, and Southwest, with the barre of S. Lucar: and then goe Northeast for the Barre. Take this for a warning, that if going in 37. degrees th stir away East for the Isle of Fayal or of Flores . Markes to know the Isle of Fayal. THE Island called Fayal upon the Southwest side, maketh an high hill or loafe like to the top of Brasilla in the Island of Terzera; and behinde t
aint Marie. And going thus, and not seeing Land, but seeing the Sea to breake, make account it is the rocks called las Hormigas. And if thou thinke good to goe to Faial , thou shalt goe till thou be in 38. degrees 1/2 scant, and then thou shalt goe East, and so shalt have sight of Faial . The markes of it be these.* Comming ouFaial . The markes of it be these.* Comming out from Faial , and leaving all the Islandes, then all goe East and by South untill thou bring thy selfe in 37. degrees, which is the height of Cape Saint Vincent: and then goe East, and thou shalt see the Cape having the markes aforesayd. And from Cape S. Vincent thou must goe East Southeast, till thou be Northeast, and Southwest,Faial , and leaving all the Islandes, then all goe East and by South untill thou bring thy selfe in 37. degrees, which is the height of Cape Saint Vincent: and then goe East, and thou shalt see the Cape having the markes aforesayd. And from Cape S. Vincent thou must goe East Southeast, till thou be Northeast, and Southwest, with the barre of S. Lucar: and then goe Northeast for the Barre. Take this for a warning, that if going in 37. degrees thou have not sight of Cape S. Vincent, and hast sight of certaine hie hils, make accompt they are Sierras de Monchico. I advise thee, that if thou stand in feare of men of warre about the Cape of S. Vi
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