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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Homer, Odyssey 174 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 166 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 20 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 6 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 6 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Cyclops (ed. David Kovacs) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler). You can also browse the collection for Ithaca (Greece) or search for Ithaca (Greece) in all documents.

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Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 2, line 600 (search)
e sea-shore, the rock Olene and Alesium. These had four leaders, and each of them had ten ships, with many Epeans on board. Their leaders were Amphimakhos and Thalpios - the one, son of Kteatos, and the other, of Eurytos - both of the race of Aktor. The two others were Diores, son of Amarynkes, and Polyxenos, son of King Agasthenes, son of Augeas. And those of Dulichium with the sacred Echinean islands, who dwelt beyond the sea off Elis; these were led by Meges, peer of Ares, and the son of valiant Phyleus, dear to Zeus, who quarreled with his father, and went to settle in Dulichium. With him there came forty ships. Odysseus led the brave Cephallenians, who held Ithaca, Neritum with its forests, Crocylea, rugged Aegilips, Samos and Zacynthus, with the mainland also that was over against the islands. These were led by Odysseus, peer of Zeus in counsel, and with him there came twelve ships. Thoas, son of Andraimon, commanded the Aetolians, who dwelt in Pleuron, Olenus, Pylene,
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 3, line 161 (search)
zons, peers of men, came up against them, but even they were not so many as the Achaeans." The old man next looked upon Odysseus; "Tell me," he said, "who is that other, shorter by a head than Agamemnon, but broader across the chest and shoulders? His armor is laid upon the ground, and he stalks in front of the ranks as it were some great woolly ram ordering his ewes." And Helen answered, "He is Odysseus, a man of great craft, son of Laertes. He was born in the district [dêmos] of rugged Ithaca, and excels in all manner of stratagems and subtle cunning." On this Antenor said, "my lady, you have spoken truly. Odysseus once came here as envoy about yourself, and Menelaos with him. I received them in my own house, and therefore know both of them by sight and conversation. When they stood up in presence of the assembled Trojans, Menelaos was the broader shouldered, but when both were seated Odysseus had the more royal presence. After a time they delivered their message, and the speec