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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 6 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
d be to deprive one of every means of making a movement into the enemy's country; now, it would be all the more natural to free one's self of it, as there is not a campaign of the last wars and of those of Prince Eugene and of Marlborough that does not test the nullity of these pretended mathematical rules. Did not General Moreau find himself at the gates of Vienna in 1800, whilst Fussen, Sharnitz and all the Tyrol, were yet in the power of the Austrians? Did not Napoleon find himself at Placentia when Turin, Genoa and the Coldi Tendi were occupied by the army of Melas? I shall ask finally what geometrical figure did the army of Prince Eugene of Savoy form when it marched by Stradella and Asti to the succor of Turin, leaving the French on the Mincis at a few leagues only from his base? Those three events would suffice, in my opinion, to prove that the compass of the geometrician will ever wane, not only before such geniuses as Napoleon and Frederick, but before great characters
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 4: grand tactics, and battles. (search)
g, which we have reported in the history of the wars of the Revolution, (Chap. 21, and 52,) that of the lines of Turin, by Prince Eugene of Savoy, in 1706, are great lessons to study. This famous event of Turin, which we have already often cited, is too well known for us to recall its circumstances, but we could not dispense with observing that never was a triumph bought so cheaply, nor more difficult to conceive. In truth, the strategic plan was admirable; the march from the Adige by Placentia upon Asti by the right of the Po, leaving the French upon the Mincio, was perfectly combined; but as for the operations under Turin, it must be owned that the conquerors were more fortunate than wise. The Prince Eugene had no need of a great effort of genius to draw up the order which he gave his army, and he must have cruelly despised his adversaries to execute the march which was to direct thirty-five thousand allies of ten different nations, between eighty thousand French and the Alps,
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 5: of different mixed operations, which participate at the same time of strategy and.of tactics. (search)
azards. In the same campaign, the passage of the Po by Napoleon offered another example of the strategic importance which is attached to the choice of the point of passage; the army of reserve, after the combat of the ,Chiusella, could march by the left of the Po to Turin, or pass the river at Crescentino and march direct to Genoa; Napoleon preferred to pass the Ticino, to enter Milan, to unite there with Moncey, who came with twenty thousand men by the St. Gothard, then to pass the Po at Placentia, persuaded that he would more surely precede Melas upon that point, than if he changed direction too soon upon his line of retreat. The passage of the Danube at Donanwerth and Ingolstadt, in 1805, was an operation nearly of the same kind; the direction chosen became the first cause of the destruction of the army of Mack. The suitable point in strategy is easily determined, after what we have said in Article 19, and it is not.useless to recollect that in a passage of a river, as in ever
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 12: army organization—Engineers.—Their history, duties, and organization,—with a brief discussion, showing their importance as a part of a modern army organization. (search)
f the enemy. Undertaken under such circumstances, the enterprise was extremely sanguinary, and at one time very doubtful ; and had it failed, Moreau's army would have been ruined for the campaign. Napoleon's celebrated passage of the Po, at Placentia, shows plainly how important it is for a general to possess the means of crossing rivers. I felt the importance of hastening the enterprise in order not to allow the enemy time to prevent it. But the Po, which is a river as wide and deep as the Rhine, is a barrier difficult to be overcome. We had no means of constructing a bridge, and were obliged to content ourselves with the means of embarkation found at Placentia and its environs. Lannes, chief of brigade, crossed in the first boats, with the advanced guard. The Austrians had only ten squadrons on the other side, and these were easily overcome. The passage was now continued without interruption, but very slowly. If I had had a good ponton-equipage, the fate of the enemy's ar
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 14: field-engineering.—Field Fortifications.—Military Communications.—Military Bridges.—Sapping, Mining, and the attack and defence of a fortified place (search)
gons. The number of wagons in a ponton train will be greatly diminished if it be found that Indian-rubber boats may be used as supports for the bridge. The engineer department of our army are making experiments to determine this point. Under favorable circumstances, and with a well-instructed corps of pontoniers, the bridge may be thrown across the river, and prepared for the passage of an army in a few hours at most. In 1746, three bridges of bateaux were thrown across the Po, near Placentia, each fifteen hundred feet in length, and entirely completed in eight hours. In 1757, two bridges of bateaux were thrown across the Rhine, at Wesel, in half an hour; again, in the same year, a third bridge was thrown across this river near Dusseldorf, in six hours. In 1841, Col. Birago, of the Austrian army, arrived on the bank of the Weisgerben arm of the Danube, with his bridge-equipage, at a round trot, and immediately began the construction of his bridge, without any previous preparati
ca65100 1866Persian Gulf160110 1866*Khios to Crete2001,200 1867South Foreland, England, to La Panne, France4728 1867Malta to Alexandria, Egypt9252,000 1867Havana to Key West, Florida12520 1867Key West to Punta Russia, Fla12020 1867Placentia, Newfoundland, to St. Pierre11276 1867St. Pierre to Sydney, Cape Breton188250 1867Arendal, Norway, to Hirtshalts, Denmark66110 1868Italy to Sicily540 1868Havana to Key West, Florida125 1869Peterhead, Scotland, to Egursand, Norway25070 1869Grisse 1871Porto Rico to Jamaica582 1872Lizard, England, to Bilbao, Spain460 1872British Columbia to Vancouver Island.18 1873Falmouth to Lisbon850 1873Caithness to Orkney8 1873Valentia to Newfoundland1,900 1873Key West to Havana125 1873Placentia, Newfoundland, to Sydney, Cape Breton300 1873Heligoland to Cuxhaven, Germany40 1873England to Denmark350 1873France to Denmark450 1873Denmark to Sweden12 1873Pernambuco, Brazil, to Para, Brazil1,080 1873Alexandria, Egypt, to Crete390 1873Candia
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
young nobleman afterwards became widely known, and acquired a melancholy interest from his long imprisonment in the fortress of Spielberg. a young man of much culture, who has travelled Europe quite over; Borgieri, one of a few literary hopes of Italy, who, as well as Confalonieri, has often been with us in our excursions before; and a Russian general. . . . . The whole drive was about thirty-five miles; we reached Milan at eight o'clock, and we all dined very happily with the Marquis. Placentia, October 9.—While waiting for our supper last night, —which we were obliged to wait for a long time, as the heir apparent of the throne of Sardinia lodged at the same inn,—I amused myself with looking out, in the two great Roman historians, all the notices I could find of this little city. They were not very interesting, but somewhat curious. It was founded by a Roman colony, about A. U. 534, and seems to have been so well built and fortified-probably because it was a frontier town—as t
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
. 313 and note, 332, 358, 359, 365. Pertz, Mrs., II. 359, 365. Peter, America Pinkney, T. 38; Britannia Wellington, 38; Columbia Washington, 38; Thomas, 38. Peter, Mrs. See Custis. Peters, of Merton, II. 168. Petrarch, letter on, I. 341-344. Philadelphia, visits, T. 15, 352, II. 222. Phillips, Jonathan, II. 300. Phillips, Professor J., I. 422, 437 and note, II. 176. Phillips, Thomas J., I. 443, II. 155. Phillips, Willard, I. 391, II. 489. Piacenza, visits (Placentia), I. 162, II. 338. Picard, William, letter to, 11. 455. Piccolomini, Monsignor, II. 67, 68. Pichler, Caroline, 11. 12. Pichon, Baron, I. 132, 261, II. 113, 114, 120. Pickering, John, I. 85, 391, II. 251. Pickering, Octavius, I. 391. Pictet, Deodati, I. 153, II. 37. Pictet, Professor, I. 153, 155, 159, II. 37. Pierce, Professor B., II. 310. Pillans, James, I. 280. Piltz, Dr., II. 313. Pinkney, William, I. 39, 40, 41 and note. Pisa, visits, II. 92-94. Pitt
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
housand wooded islands lie, Gems of the waters! with each hue Of brightness set in ocean's blue. Each bears aloft its tuft of trees Touched by the pencil of the frost, And, with the motion of each breeze, A moment seen, a moment lost, Changing and blent, confused and tossed, The brighter with the darker crossed, Their thousand tints of beauty glow Down in the restless waves below, And tremble in the sunny skies, As if, from waving bough to bough, Flitted the birds of paradise. There sleep Placentia's group, and there Pere Breteaux marks the hour of prayer; And there, beneath the sea-worn cliff, On which the Father's hut is seen, The Indian stays his rocking skiff, And peers the hemlock-boughs between, Half trembling, as he seeks to look Upon the Jesuit's Cross and Book. Father Hennepin, a missionary among the Iroquois, mentions that the Indians believed him to be a conjurer, and that they were particularly afraid of a bright silver chalice which he had in his possession. ‘The Indi