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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
Fort OswegoMay 4 and 5, Sandy CreekMay 30, 1814 Odell TownJune 28, 1814 Fort ErieJuly 3, 1814 ChippewaJuly 5, 1814 ChamplainJuly 18 and 19, Lundy's Lane (Niagara Falls)July 25, 1814 Fort Mackinack (Mackinaw)Aug. 4, 1814 Fort ErieAug. 13-15, 1814 BladensburgAug. 24, 1814 PlattsburgSept. 11, 1814 North PointSept. 12 1814 Fort McHenry (Bombardment of)Sept. 13, 1814 Fort BowerSept. 15, 1814 Fort Erie (Sortie from)Sept. 17, 1814 ChippewaOct. 15, 1814 Lyon's CreekOct. 19, 1814 Fort OswegoMay 4 and 5, Sandy CreekMay 30, 1814 Odell TownJune 28, 1814 Fort ErieJuly 3, 1814 ChippewaJuly 5, 1814 ChamplainJuly 18 and 19, Lundy's Lane (Niagara Falls)July 25, 1814 Fort Mackinack (Mackinaw)Aug. 4, 1814 Fort ErieAug. 13-15, 1814 BladensburgAug. 24, 1814 PlattsburgSept. 11, 1814 North PointSept. 12 1814 Fort McHenry (Bombardment of)Sept. 13, 1814 Fort BowerSept. 15, 1814 Fort Erie (Sortie from)Sept. 17, 1814 ChippewaOct. 15, 1814 Lyon's CreekOct. 19, 181
dians were under the chief command of Gen. Peter B. Porter, then quartermastergeneral of the New York militia. Major McRee, of North Carolina, was chief-engineer, assisted by Maj. E. D. Wood. On the Canada shore, nearly opposite Buffalo, stood Fort Erie, then garrisoned by 170 men, under the command of Major Buck. On July 1 Brown received orders to cross the Niagara, capture Fort Erie, march on Chippewa, menace Fort George, and, if he could have the co-operation of Chauncey's fleet, to seize Fort Erie, march on Chippewa, menace Fort George, and, if he could have the co-operation of Chauncey's fleet, to seize and fortify Burlington Heights. Accordingly, Brown arranged for General Scott and his brigade to cross on boats and land a mile below the fort, while Ripley, with his brigade, should be landed a mile above it. This accomplished, the boats were to return and carry the remainder of the army, with its ordnance and stores, to the Canada shore. The order for this movement was given on July 2. It was promptly obeyed by Scott, and tardily by Ripley, on the 3d. When Scott had pressed forward to inv
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canals. (search)
y, Md., to Delaware City, Del. Chesapeake and Ohio11,290,3271850184Cumberland, Md., to Washington, D. C. Chicago Drainage. See next page. Companys 90,000184722Mississippi River, La., to Bayou Black, La. Delaware and Raritan 4,888,749183866New Brunswick, N. J., to Trenton, N. J. Delaware Division2,433,350183060Easton, Pa., to Bristol, Pa. Des Moines Rapids4,582,00918777 1-2At Des Moines Rapids, Mississippi River. Dismal Swamp2,800,000182222Connects Chesapeake Bay with Albemarle Sound. Erie 52,540,8001825381Albany, N. Y., to Buffalo, N. Y. Fairfield 4 1-2Alligator River to Lake Mattimuskeet, N. C. Galveston and Brazos340,000185138Galveston, Tex., to Brazos River, Tex. Hocking 975,481184342Carroll, O., to Nelsonville, O. Illinois and Michigan7,357,7871848102Chicago, 111., to La Salle, Ill. Illinois and Mississippi568,64318954 1-2Around lower rapids of Rock River, Ill. Connects with Mississippi River. Lehigh Coal and Navigation Co.4,455,0001821108Coalport, Pa., to Easton, Pa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chippewa, battle of (search)
Chippewa, battle of General Brown took prompt measures to secure the advantages derived from the capture of Fort Erie (see Canada), for it was known that General Riall, who was then in chief command on the Niagara frontier, was moving towards Fort Erie. Early in the morning of July 3, 1814, he had sent forward some of the Royal Scots to reinforce the garrison. At Chippewa, at the mouth of Chippewa Creek, they heard of the surrender of the fort, when Riall determined to make an immediate Fort Erie. Early in the morning of July 3, 1814, he had sent forward some of the Royal Scots to reinforce the garrison. At Chippewa, at the mouth of Chippewa Creek, they heard of the surrender of the fort, when Riall determined to make an immediate attack upon the Americans on Canadian soil. Hearing that reinforcements were coming from York, he deferred the attack until the next morning. To meet this force, General Brown sent forward General Scott with his brigade, accompanied by Towson's artillery, on the morning of the 4th. Ripley was ordered in the same direction with his brigade, but was not ready to move until the afternoon. Scott went down the Canada side of the Niagara River, skirmishing nearly all the way to Street's Creek, dr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drummond, Sir George Gordon, 1771-1854 (search)
Drummond, Sir George Gordon, 1771-1854 Military officer; born in Quebec in 1771; entered the British army in 1789; served in Holland and Egypt; and in 1811 was made lieutenant-general. In 1813 he was second in command to Sir George Prevost; planned the capture of Fort Niagara in December of that year; took the villages of Black Rock and Buffalo; captured Oswego in May, 1814; and was in chief command of the British forces at the battle of Lundy's Lane (q. v.)in July. In August he was repulsed at Fort Erie, with heavy loss, and was severely wounded. He succeeded Prevost in 1814, and returned to England in 1816. The next year he received the grand cross of the Bath. He died in London, Oct. 10, 1854.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Elliott, Jesse Duncan, 1782-1845 (search)
Elliott, Jesse Duncan, 1782-1845 Naval officer; born in Maryland, July 14, 1782; entered the United States navy as midshipman in Jesse Duncan Elliott. April, 1804; and rose to master, July 24, 1813. He was with Barron in the Tripolitan War, and served on the Lakes with Chauncey and Perry in the War of 1812-15. He captured two British vessels, Detroit and Caledonia, at Fort Erie, for which exploit he was presented by Congress with a sword. He was in command of the Niagara in Perry's famous combat on Lake Erie, to which the Commodore The Elliott medal. went from the Lawrence during the action. He succeeded Perry in command on Lake Erie in October, 1813. Elliott was with Decatur in the Mediterranean in 1815, and was promoted to captain in March, 1818. He commanded the West India squadron (1829-32); took charge of the navy-yard at Charleston in 1833; and afterwards cruised several years in the Mediterranean. On his return he was court-martialled, and suspended from comma
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Erie, Fort, (search)
Erie, Fort, A small and weak fortification erected on a plain 12 or 15 feet above the waters ofn duty there, was informed of the arrival at Fort Erie, opposite, of two vessels from Detroit, bothptives in less than ten minutes. The guns at Fort Erie were brought to bear upon the vessels. A stss of the British is not known. A shot from Fort Erie crossed the river and instantly killed Maj. ieutenant-Colonel Drummond, began a siege of Fort Erie, with about 5,000 men. Drummond perceived thrgan. Meanwhile Drummond had opened fire on Fort Erie with some 24-pounders. From Aug. 7 to Aug. Explanation of the above map. A, old Fort Erie; a, a, demi-bastions; b, a ravelin, and c, c by the line g, the Douglass Battery, i, and Fort Erie; on the left, and in front, by the lines. ; . Five times they made a gallant Ruins of Fort Erie, 1860. attack, when, after fearful loss, thechments were in the hands of the Americans. Fort Erie was saved, with Buffalo, and stores on the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Erie, Lake, battle on. (search)
Erie, Lake, battle on. Who should be masters of Lake Erie was an important question to be solved in 1813. The United States government did not fulfil its promise to Hull to provide means for securing the naval supremacy on Lake Erie. The necessity for such an attainment was so obvious before the close of 1812 that the government took vigorous action in the matter. Isaac Chauncey was in command of a little squadron on Lake Ontario late Perry's battle flag. in 1812, and Capt. Oliver Hazard Perry, a zealous young naval officer, of Rhode Island, who was in command of a flotilla of gunboats on the Newport station, offered his services on the Lakes. Chauncey desired his services, and on Feb. 17 Perry received orders from the Secretary of the Navy to report to Chauncey with all possible despatch, and to take with him to Sackett's Harbor all of the best men of the flotilla at Newport. He sent them forward, in companies of fifty, under Sailing-Masters Almy, Champlin, and Taylor.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gaines, Edmund Pendleton 1777-1849 (search)
Gaines, Edmund Pendleton 1777-1849 Military officer; born in Culpeper county, Va., March 20, 1777; removed with his family to Tennessee in 1790; entered the army as ensign in 1799; and was promoted to lieutenant-colonel in the summer of 1812. He rose to brigadier-general in March, 1814; and after his gallant conduct at Fort Erie in August, that year, he was brevetted major-general. For that exploit, and Edmund Pendleton Gaines. his general good services during the war, Congress gave him thanks and a gold medal. Gaines served under Jackson in the Creek War, and fought the Seminoles in 1836. Late in life he married Myra Clark, of New Orleans, heiress of a large estate, who, after his death, became General Gaines's medal. famous for her successful persistence in litigation to secure her rights. He died in New Orleans, June 6. 1849.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gardner, Charles K. 1787-1869 (search)
Gardner, Charles K. 1787-1869 Military officer; born in Morris county, N. J., in 1787; joined the army in May, 1808; served in the War of 1812, being present at the actions of Chrysler's Field, Chippewa, Niagara, and Fort Erie; was in the Treasury Department in 1850-67. His publications include A dictionary of commissioned officers who have served in the army of the United States from 1789 to 1853; A compendium of military tactics; and A permanent designation of companies, and Company books, by the first letters of the alphabet. He died in Washington, D. C., Nov. 1, 1869.
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