hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Orleans, Duke of -1850 (search)
Orleans, Duke of -1850 Son of Philippe Egalite, was in the French Revolutionary army, but becoming involved with Dumouriez in 1793; fled from France to Switzerland; and in 1796 came to America, where he travelled extensively, visiting Washington at Mount Vernon in 1797. He was elected King of the French in 1830, and reigned until his abdication in 1848. He died in Claremont, England, Aug. 26, 1850.
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Victoria, Queen of England. (search)
leepiness during these late entertainments. The day before yesterday, Monday, our aunt gave a brilliant ball here at Kensington Palace, at which the gentlemen appeared in uniform, and the ladies in so-called fancy dresses. We remained till four o'clock. Duke William of Brunswick, the Prince of Orange and his two sons, and the Duke of Wellington were the only guests that you will care to hear about. Yesterday we spent with the Duke of Northumberland, at Sion, and now we are going to Claremont. From this account you will see how constantly engaged we are, and that we must make the most of our time to see at least some of the sights in London. Dear aunt is very kind to us, and does everything she can to please us; and our cousin also is very amiable. We have not a great deal of room in our apartments, but are nevertheless very comfortably lodged. The queen has since recorded her recollections of the prince at the time of this visit: The prince was at that time much sh
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 50: last months of the Civil War.—Chase and Taney, chief-justices.—the first colored attorney in the supreme court —reciprocity with Canada.—the New Jersey monopoly.— retaliation in war.—reconstruction.—debate on Louisiana.—Lincoln and Sumner.—visit to Richmond.—the president's death by assassination.—Sumner's eulogy upon him. —President Johnson; his method of reconstruction.—Sumner's protests against race distinctions.—death of friends. —French visitors and correspondents.—1864-1865. (search)
was the expression of the emperor's will. Montalembert, whom Sumner had met on his later visits to Paris, rejoiced in our successes, and expressed in his letters his admiration of Sumner's career. The Count of Paris, The count, who wrote English as perfectly as French, wrote to Sumner in French, saying that he did so because of Sumner's thorough knowledge of the language. whose connection with our army led to his History of the Civil War, wrote frequently and at length. Writing from Claremont, Nov. 8, 1863, he testified his sympathy for the liberal and national cause, and counted his conversations with the senator as among the most valued recollections of his sojourn in America. Sumner wrote to Richard Gordon, April 9, 1863:— I am sad to think of your poor father's death. I was hoping soon for another letter from him, when your communication told the melancholy tidings. And so another of my Montpellier friends has dropped away. I took a great interest, you may remembe