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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 2 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut, (search)
t at Saybrook, at the mouth of the Connecticut, beleaguered by the Pequods all the winter of......1636-37 About thirty colonists of Connecticut killed by the Pequods during the winter of......1636-37 Court at Newtown (Hartford) applies to Massachusetts for aid against the Pequods......Feb. 21, 1637 [The name Newtown is changed to Hartford, Watertown to Wethersfield, and Dorchester to Windsor by this court. Hartford was so named in horor of the Rev. Mr. Stone, who was born at Hartford, England.] Wethersfield attacked by the Pequods, several killed......April, 1637 The court at Hartford, bent on offensive war against the Pequods, call for eightyeight men—forty-two from Hartford, thirty from Windsor, sixteen from Wethersfield......May 1, 1637 These are joined by Uncas, sachem of the Mohegans, with seventy warriors, at Say-Brook fort......May 15, 1637 Capt. John Mason, of Windsor, commanding the expedition, sails from Fort Say-Brook for Narraganset Bay, to surprise
and spoke harshly of their opponents. It is not surprising, therefore, that Cotton and Hooker should feel that their close proximity was irritating rather than refreshing. On the whole, I think, the strong bent of their spirits to remove was not altogether caused by lack of sufficient land or by straitness of accommodations. However doubtful the cause, the fact is certain, that the greater part of the First Church and Congregation removed from New Town; more than fifty families went to Hartford, and others elsewhere. Of the families residing here before January, 1635, not more than eleven are known to have remained. The following list of inhabitants is compiled from the Records of the Town, under the dates when they first appear. It should be observed, however, that perhaps many of them were here earlier than the dates would indicate. For example, Dudley and Bradstreet, and probably others, under date of 1632, were here in 1631; many of those who are entered under date of 163
n streets in 1635, which he sold to Edward Winship, and removed to Hartford, where he was a juror in 1642, and Deputy to the General Court in he easterly side of Mason Street to Edward Winship, and removed to Hartford before 1639. 3. Jonas, the famous ruling Elder of the Cambridgestands, now owned by Professor Longfellow. He rem. with Hooker to Hartford. He was several years a Deputy or Representative of Hartford, andHartford, and subsequently of Waterbury, to which place he removed. He was great-grandfather of Rev. Jonathan Judd, the first minister of Southampton, Mas, was prob. brought up by his grandfather, Rev. Thomas Hooker, at Hartford; grad. H. C. 1658, ordained at Rowley 15 Nov. 1665, and d. 7 Ap. urchase. He sold his estate here 1681, having recently removed to Hartford. Hinman says he became a man of consequence in the Colony. 8. of the first ministers of Cambridge and Hartford, was born in Hartford, England, and was educated at Emanuel College. came to New England in
669. Mary the mother, widow of Leonard, had become the wife of Richard Russell, Esq., of Chs. Clark, John (or Clarke), owned the lot on the easterly corner of Brattle and Mason streets in 1635, which he sold to Edward Winship, and removed to Hartford, where he was a juror in 1642, and Deputy to the General Court in 1649. 2. Nicholas, sold a lot on the easterly side of Mason Street to Edward Winship, and removed to Hartford before 1639. 3. Jonas, the famous ruling Elder of the CambridgeHartford before 1639. 3. Jonas, the famous ruling Elder of the Cambridge Church, was here in 1642, and Selectman in 1679 and 1690. He seems to have been a shipmaster in early life. The General (Court Records, under date of Oct. 18, 1654, contain a report made by Mr. Jonas Clarke and Mr. Samuel Andrews, both well skilled in the mathematics, having had the command of ships upon several voyages, being appointed to take an observation at the northerly bounds of our Patent upon the sea-coast, etc. This report, doubtless made by two residents of Camb., is dated Oct. 29,
9. Judd, Thomas, one of the first company, was here in 1635, and res. on the northerly side of Brattle Street; his homestead probably embraced the spot where the Craigie House stands, now owned by Professor Longfellow. He rem. with Hooker to Hartford. He was several years a Deputy or Representative of Hartford, and subsequently of Waterbury, to which place he removed. He was great-grandfather of Rev. Jonathan Judd, the first minister of Southampton, Mass., of whom Sylvester Judd, Esq., of and res. on the northerly side of Brattle Street; his homestead probably embraced the spot where the Craigie House stands, now owned by Professor Longfellow. He rem. with Hooker to Hartford. He was several years a Deputy or Representative of Hartford, and subsequently of Waterbury, to which place he removed. He was great-grandfather of Rev. Jonathan Judd, the first minister of Southampton, Mass., of whom Sylvester Judd, Esq., of Northampton, a diligent and accurate antiquarian, was grandson.
09, and was buried at Chs. in the tomb with her husband and son. 5. Samuel, s. of Thomas (1), was prob. brought up by his grandfather, Rev. Thomas Hooker, at Hartford; grad. H. C. 1658, ordained at Rowley 15 Nov. 1665, and d. 7 Ap. 1668, a. 26. His son Samuel, bap. 25 Aug. 1667, grad. H. C. 1685. 6. Jeremiah, s. of Thoma. 1666. John the f. was a cooper, and inherited the homestead, to which he made additions by purchase. He sold his estate here 1681, having recently removed to Hartford. Hinman says he became a man of consequence in the Colony. 8. Thomas, s. of Thomas (4), grad. H. C. 1676, succeeded his father in the ministry at Chs., whertreets. He rem. with Hooker to Hartford, where he was Selectman in 1647. Stone, Samuel, one of the first ministers of Cambridge and Hartford, was born in Hartford, England, and was educated at Emanuel College. came to New England in 1633, and settled at Camb. with Rev. Thomas Hooker 11 Oct. 1633, admitted freeman 1634, remov
ur private letters. The statesmen of that day in Massachusetts were more wise, and understood the doctrine of liberty better than the chancellor of England. A century later, and there were none in England who did not esteem the commission an unconstitutional usurpation. Boyle, in Mass. Hist Coll. XVIII Chalmers. To Connecticut, the controversy of Massachusetts 1664 with the commissioners was fraught with beneficial results. It facilitated the entire union of the two colonies of Hartford and New Haven; and, as the commissioners were desirous to make friends in the other colonies, they avoided all angry collisions, gave no countenance to a claim advanced by the duke of Hamilton to a large tract of territory in the colony, and, in arranging the limits of New York, though the charter of Clarendon's son-in-law extended to the River Connecticut, they established the boundary, on the main, in conformity with the claims of Connecticut itself. Long Island went to the duke of York.