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Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
; but the greater part of us become foxes, and other worse animals. For what else is a slanderer and a malignant man than a fox, or some other more wretched and meaner animal? Seeo(ra=te kai\ prose/xete mh/ ti tou/twn a)pobh=te tw=n a)tuxhma/twn. Upton compares Matthew xvi. 6: o(ra=te kai\ prose/xete a)po\ th=s zu/mhs, Upton remarks that many expressions in Epictetus are not unlike the style of the Gospels, which were written in the same period in which Epictetus was teaching. Schweighaeuser al than a fox, or some other more wretched and meaner animal? Seeo(ra=te kai\ prose/xete mh/ ti tou/twn a)pobh=te tw=n a)tuxhma/twn. Upton compares Matthew xvi. 6: o(ra=te kai\ prose/xete a)po\ th=s zu/mhs, Upton remarks that many expressions in Epictetus are not unlike the style of the Gospels, which were written in the same period in which Epictetus was teaching. Schweighaeuser also refers to Wetstein's New Testament. then and take care that you do not become some one of these miserable things.
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
alking to an athlete, I should say, Show me your shoulders; and then he might say, Here are my Halteres. You and your HalteresHalteres are gymnastic instruments (Galen. i. De Sanitate tuenda; Martial, xiv. 49; Juvenal, vi. 420, and the Scholiast. Upton). Halteres is a Greek word, literally leapers. They are said to have been masses of lead, used for exercise and in making jumps. The effect of such weights in taking a jump is well known to boys who have used them. A couple of bricks will serve ta fossa viros. Juvenal (vi. 421) writes of a woman who uses dumb-bells till she sweats, and is then rubbed dry by a man, Quum lassata gravi ceciderunt brachia massa. (Macleane's Juvenal.) As to the expression, *)/oyei su\, kai\ oi( a(lth=res, see Upton's note. It is also a Latin form: Epicurus hoc viderit, Cicero, Acad. ii. c. 7; haec fortuna viderit, Ad Attic. vi. 4. It occurs in M. Antoninus, viii. 41, v. 25; and in Acta Apostol. xviii. 15.look to that. I should reply, I wish to see the effec
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
of God, and did we not come from him? Allow us to depart to the place from which we came; allow us to be released at last from these bonds by which we are bound and weighed down. Here there are robbers and thieves and courts of justice, and those who are named tyrants, and think that they have some power over us by means of the body and its possessions. Permit us to show them that they have no power over any man. And I on my part would say, Friends, wait for God: when He shall give the signalUpton refers to Cicero, Tuscul. i. 30, Cato Major, c. 20; Somnium Scipionis, c. 3 (De Republica, iv. 15); the purport of which passage is that we must not depart from life without the command of God. See Marcus Antoninus, ii. 17; iii. 5; v. 33. But how shall a man know the signal for departure, of which Epictetus speaks? and release you from this service, then go to Him; but for the present endure to dwell in this place where He has put you: short indeed is this time of your dwelling here, and eas
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
it is not probable that the good of a snail is in the shell, is it probable that the good of a man is in the body? But you yourself, Epicurus, possess something better than this. What is that in you which deliberates, what is that which examines every thing, what is that which forms a judgment about the body itself, that it is the principal part? and why do you light your lamp and labour for us, and write so manyEpicurus is said to have written more than any other person, as many as three hundred volumes (ku/lindroi, rolls). Chrysippus was his rival in this respect. For if Epicurus wrote anything, Chrysippus vied with him in writing as much; and for this reason he often repeated himself, because he did not read over what he had written, and he left his writings uncorrected in consequence of his hurry. Dio- genes Laertius, x.—Upton. See i. 4. books? is it that we may not be ignorant of the truth, who we are, and what we are with respect to you? Thus the discussion requires many words
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
They cannot deny that man has the intellectual powers which he does possess; and they are certainly not the persons who will proclaim their own want of these powers. If man has them and can exercise them, the fact is sufficient; and we need not dispute about the source of these powers which are in man Naturally, that is, according to the constitution of his Nature. How long then is it fit to observe these precepts from God, and not to break up the play?See the end of the preceding chapter. Upton compares Horace's Incidere ludum (Epp. i. 14, 36). Compare also Epictetus, ii. 16, 37. As long as the play is continued with propriety. In the SaturnaliaA festival at Rome in December, a season of jollity and license (Livy, xxii. 1). Compare the passage in Tacitus, Ann. xiii. 15, in which Nero is chosen by lot to be king: and Seneca, De Constant. Sapient. c. 12, Illi (pueri) inter ipsos magistratus gerunt, et praetextam fascesque ac tribunal imitantur. a king is chosen by lot, for it has bee
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 2 (search)
hameless in his acts; nor if a public peculator should lay hold of some cunning excuse from these doctrines; nor if another who neglects his parents should be confirmed in his audacity by this teaching.—What then in your opinion is good or bad? This or that?— Why then should a man say any more in reply to such persons as these, or give them any reason or listen to any reason from them, or try to convince them? By Zeus one might much sooner expect to make catamites change their mind than those who are become so deaf and blind to their own evils.This resembles what our Saviour said to the Jewish rulers: Verily I say unto you, that the publicans and the harlots go into the kingdom of God before you.' Matthew, xxi. 31. Mrs. Carter. To an Academic who said he comprehended nothing, the Stoic Ariston replied, 'Do you not see even the person who is sitting near you? When the Academic denied it, Ariston said,' Who made you blind? who stole your power of sight?' (Diog. Laert. vii. 163. Upton
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 2 (search)
ere there is a right use of appearances, no longer trouble yourself whether they are father or son, or brothers, or have associated a long time and are companions, but when you have ascertained this only, confidently declare that they are friends, as you declare that they are faithful, that they are just. For where else is friendship than where there is fidelity, and modesty, where there is a communiono(/pou do/sis tou= kalou=. Lord Shaftesbury suggested do/sis kai\ lh=yis tou= kalou=: which Upton approved, and he refers to ii. 9. 12, ai( a)kata/llhloi lh/yeis kai\ do/seis. Schweighaeuser suggests diado/sis which I have followed in the version. Schweig. refers to i. 12. 6 i. 14. 9. The MSS. give no help. of honest things and of nothing else? But you may say, such a one treated me with regard so lung; and did he not love me? How do you know, slave, if he did not regard you in the same way as he wipes his shoes with a sponge, or as he takes care of his beast? How do you know, when you
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 2 (search)
eculiar faculty, what else does it do, when there happens to be discourse about a thing, than to ornament the words and arrange them as hairdressers do the hair? But whether it is better to speak or to be silent, and better to speak in this way or that way, and whether this is becoming or not becoming, and the season for each and the use, what else tells us than the faculty of the will? Would you have it then to come forward and condemn itself? What then? it (the will) says,On the Greek text Upton remarks that, 'there are many passages in these dissertations which are ambiguous or rather confused on account of the small questions, and because the matter is not expanded by oratorical copiousness, not to mention other causes.' if the fact is so, can that which ministers be superior to that to which it ministers, can the horse be superior to the rider, or the dog to the huntsman, or the instrument to the musician, or the servants to the king? What is that which makes use of the rest? The
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 3 (search)
able to take it. But, if you please, let us consider this only, how this thing may be done secretly, and safely, and so that no man will know it. For not even does Epicurus himself declare stealing to be bad,Diogenes Laertius (x. 151), quoted by Upton. 'Injustice,' says Epicurus, 'is not an evil in itself, but the evil is in the fear which there is on account of suspicion.' but he admits that detection is; and because it is impossible to have security against detection, for this reason he saysl (good), but we do what is base. But you will be perverse in the contrary way, teaching what is bad, practising what is good.The MSS., with one exception, have dogmati/zwn ta\ kala\, poiw=n ta\ ai)/sxra, but it was properly corrected by Wolf, as Upton remarks, who shows from Cicero, de Fin., ii. 25 and 31, that the MSS. are wrong. In the second passage Cicero says, 'nihil in hae praeclara epistola so, ip- tum ab Epicuro congruens et conveniens decretis ejus reperietis. Ita redarguitur ipse a s
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 3 (search)
to prison. What has happened? He has been led to prison. But that herein he has fared badly, every man adds from his own opinion. But Zeus, you say, does not do right in these matters. Why? because he has made you capable of endurance? because he has made you magnanimous? because he has taken from that which befalls you the power of being evils? because it is in your power to be happy while you are suffering what you suffer; because he has opened the door to you,See i. 9. 20. when things do not please you?See ii. 6. 22, a)/n soi poih=. Upton. Man, go out and do not complain. Hear how the Romans feel towards philosophers, if you would like to know. Italicus, who was the most in repute of the philosophers, once when I was present being vexed with his own friends and as if he was suffering something intolerable said, I cannot bear it, you are killing me: you will make me such as that man is; pointing to me.Schweighaeuser says that he does not clearly see what Epictetus means; nor do I.
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