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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
s, in the direction of the main, and numbers of them had been shot and killed. Commander Rogers, in a letter to a friend (Nov. 9th), said: A boat which came off to the Seneca said one man. (giving his name) shot six of the negroes. With equal ease Dupont took possession of Big Tybee Island, at the mouth of the Savannah River, from which Fort Pulaski, which was within easy mortar distance, might be assailed, and the harbor of Savannah perfectly sealed against blockade runners. On the Martello tower on Tybee Island. this was the appearance of the tower when I sketched it, in April, 1866. its height had been somewhat. Diminished by demolishing a portion of its upper part, on which rested a roof. Such towers had been erected early in the present century along the British coasts, as a defense against an expected invasion by Bonaparte. The lower story was used for stores, and the upper, being bomb-proof, as secure quarters for the men. The walls. Terminated in a parapet, behi
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 14: movements of the Army of the Potomac.--the Monitor and Merrimack. (search)
d. Meanwhile another engine of destruction, of novel form and aspect, had been prepared at Green Point, Long Island, a short distance from New York, under the direction of its inventor, Captain John Ericsson, Franklin Buchanan. a scientific Swede, who had been a resident of the United States for twenty years. This vessel, almost a dwarf in appearance by the side of the Merrimack, presented to the eye, when afloat, a simple platform, sharp at both ends, and bearing a round revolving iron Martello tower, twenty feet in diameter and ten feet high, and forming a bomb-proof fort, in which two 11-inch Dahlgren cannon were mounted. The deck of the Monitor was only a few inches above water. The round revolving tower was twenty feet in diameter and ten feet in height above the deck. The smoke-stack was made with telescopic slides, so as to be lowered in action. The hull was sharp at both ends, the angle at the bow being about eighty degrees to the vertical line. It was only six feet
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
The first of these systems was proposed in 1790, and for a time attracted considerable notice in France, but has long since been discarded, as being utterly incompatible with the principles of the military art. A writer, however, of some pretensions in this country, recommends its adoption for the defence of Baltimore and the shores of the Chesapeake. The same author would dispense entirely with our present system of fortifications on the sea-coast, and substitute in their place wooden Martello towers! This would be very much like building 120 gun ships at Pittsburg and Memphis, for the defence of the Ohio and the Mississippi rivers, and sending out duck-boats to meet the enemy on the Atlantic! In the second system, the works on the extreme frontier are to be placed about thirty or forty miles apart, and those of the second and third lines respectively thirty or forty miles in rear of the first and second lines, and opposite the intervals. In the third system, first recomme
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 7: sea-coast defences..—Brief description of our maritime fortifications, with an Examination of the several Contests that have taken place between ships and forts, including the attack on San Juan d'ulloa, and on St. Jean d'acre (search)
orts within the last fifty years, and see what have been the results. In 1792 a considerable French squadron attacked Cagliari, whose fortifications were at that time so dilapidated and weak, as scarcely to deserve the name of defences. Nevertheless, the French fleet, after a bombardment of three days, was most signally defeated and obliged to retire. In 1794 two British ships, the Fortitude of seventy-four, and the Juno frigate of thirty-two guns, attacked a small town in the bay of Martello, Corsica, which was armed with one gun in barbette, and a garrison of thirty men. After a bombardment of two and a half hours, these ships were forced to haul off with considerable damage and loss of life. The little tower had received no injury, and its garrison were unharmed. Here were one hundred and six guns afloat against one on shore; and yet the latter was successful. In 1797 Nelson attacked the little inefficient batteries of Santa Crux, in Teneriffe, with eight vessels carryin
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
t Commanding Ammen, and Pocahontas, Lieutenant-Commander Balch, to his force, I directed him to renew his approaches with caution, and, if no opposition was met with, to occupy the channel. I am happy now to have it in my power to inform the Department that the Flag, the Augusta, and the Pocahontas, are at anchor in the harbor abreast of Tybee beacon and light, and that the Savannah has been ordered to take the same position. The abandonment of Tybee Island, on which there is a strong Martello tower, with a battery at its base, is due to the terror inspired by the bombardment of Forts Beauregard and Walker, and is a direct fruit of the victory of the 7th inst. By the fall of Tybee Island, the reduction of Fort Pulaski, which is within easy mortar distance, becomes only a question of time. The rebels have themselves placed sufficient obstructions in the river at Fort Pulaski, and thus by the co-operation of their own fears with our efforts, the harbor of Savannah is effectua
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
t Commanding Ammen, and Pocahontas, Lieutenant-Commander Balch, to his force, I directed him to renew his approaches with caution, and, if no opposition was met with, to occupy the channel. I am happy now to have it in my power to inform the Department that the Flag, the Augusta, and the Pocahontas, are at anchor in the harbor abreast of Tybee beacon and light, and that the Savannah has been ordered to take the same position. The abandonment of Tybee Island, on which there is a strong Martello tower, with a battery at its base, is due to the terror inspired by the bombardment of Forts Beauregard and Walker, and is a direct fruit of the victory of the 7th inst. By the fall of Tybee Island, the reduction of Fort Pulaski, which is within easy mortar distance, becomes only a question of time. The rebels have themselves placed sufficient obstructions in the river at Fort Pulaski, and thus by the co-operation of their own fears with our efforts, the harbor of Savannah is effectua
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Monitor and
Merrimac
. (search)
he army and navy officers of that vicinity passed the night of the 8th, for there appeared no competent human agency near to avert the threatened disaster. Meanwhile another vessel of novel form and aspect had been constructed at Greenpoint, L. I., under the direction of the eminent engineer, Capt. John Ericsson (q. v.). It was a dwarf in appearance by the side of the Merrimac. It presented to the eye, when afloat, a simple platform, sharp at both ends, and bearing in its centre a round Martello tower 20 feet in diameter and 10 feet in height, made, as Interior of the monitor's turret. was the rest of the vessel, of heavy iron. It presented a bomb-proof fort, in which were mounted two 11-inch Dahlgren guns. The hull of this vessel was only 8 1/2 feet in depth, with a flat bottom, and was 124 feet in length, and 34 feet the greatest width at top. On this hull rested another, 5 feet in height, that extended over the lower one 3 feet 7 inches all around, excepting at the ends, whe
idge-head. Base.Brisure. Basket-work.Bulwark. Bastion.Buttress. Bastioned fort.Caltrop. Batardeau.Camouflet. Battery.Canditeer. Bavins.Capital. Berme.Caponniere. Blind.Casemate. Blindage.Cavalier. Block-house.Cavin. Chamber.Intrenchment. Chemin des rondes.Iron fortification. Cheval de frise.Klicket. Circumvallation.Line. Citadel.Liziere. Coffer.Lodgment. Coffin.Loop-hole. Contour.Lunette. Contravallation.Magazine. Cordon.Magistral. Corridor.Mantlet. Counterguard.Martello tower. Countermine.Masked battery. Counterscarp.Merlon. Counter swallow-tail.Mine. Counter-trench.Moat. Countervallation.Moineau. Counter-works.Orgues. Coupurus.Orillon. Covered way.Outwork. Cremaillere.Palisade. Crenette.Parados. Crest.Parallel. Crotchet.Parapet. Crown-work.Picket. Crow's-feet.Place of arms. Cunette.Plane. Curtain.Platform. Dead-angle.Plonge. Deblai.Portcullis. Demi-bastion.Postern. Demi-lune.Priests' cap. Demi-revetment.Profile. Detached works.Ramp.
lag-officer Dupont's dispatches. Washington, Nov. 29. --Dispatches have been received at the Navy Department from Flag-Officer Dupont, dated Port Royal, November 25, giving the gratifying intelligence that the flag of the United States is now floating over the territory of the State of Georgia, from Tybee Island, which he says is within easy mortar distance of Fort Pulaski, has been taken possession of, and the approaches to Savannah are completely cut off. On the island is a strong Martello tower, with a battery at its base. Sir James Ferguson. Washington, Nov. 29. --Sir James Ferguson having denied that he was acting as a spy when visiting this country, it is only an act of justice to him to say that he was charged by many persons in the South with letters to be delivered or distributed through the post-offices in the North, and on arriving in Washington and being informed that such a conveyance of correspondence was prohibited by the Government, he at once repai