hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 12 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 2 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Tracking Satyrs (ed. Anne Mahoney) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 2 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Electra (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 2 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Theogony 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley). You can also browse the collection for Maia (Portugal) or search for Maia (Portugal) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley), book 2, He sets the conveniences of a country retirement in opposition to the troubles of a life in town. (search)
He sets the conveniences of a country retirement in opposition to the troubles of a life in town. This was [ever] among the number of my wishes: a portion of ground not over large, in which was a garden, and a founain with a continual stream close to my house, and a little woodland besides.The gods have done more abundantly, and better, for me [than this]. It is well: 0 son of Maia, Maia nate. He addresses his prayer to Mercury, not only because this god was a patron of poets in general, and that our poet, as we find in his Odes, was particularly obliged to his protection, but because he presided over industry and merchandise, as Hercules did over any sudden, accidental increase of riches. Besides, he was a rural deity, from whence, as Dacier observes, the poet recommends the preservation of his cattle to him, in the fourteenth verse. I ask nothing more save that you w