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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 112 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 32 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 30 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Fort Niagara (New York, United States) or search for Fort Niagara (New York, United States) in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
ed in putting down piracy in the West Indies, and long after the war was started she was hovering off the western coast of Africa, capturing the Nightingale, a slaver with over 960 slaves herded between decks. During the war she was used mainly as a school-ship. At Hampton Roads lay the steam sloop Brooklyn, and at New York lay the store-ship Relief, that mounted but two guns. The remainder of the serviceable ships actually in commission were scattered in all parts of the earth. The Niagara, a screw frigate and the first built by Steers, the famous clipper-ship constructor, was the farthest away from the Atlantic ports. She was on special duty in Japanese waters, and in the best of circumstances could not report where her services were most needed for several months. The rest of the ships on foreign stations would require from a week to a month to gain home waters. Of the forty-eight ships that were in dock or in the navy-yards, there was none that could be prepared for s
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
rizes to the vessels who took them, before November 1, 1864, amounted to $21,840,000. Subsequently this sum was increased by new decisions of the prize-courts, and actually the total loss to owners who ventured in the business and who principally resided in Great Britain, was in the neighborhood of $30,000,000. The damage paid in the Alabama Claims decision was very little more than half this sum. The first prize captured off Charleston was the ship General Parkhill that was taken by the Niagara. The second of Charleston's prizes was the schooner Savannah that was taken by the United States brig Perry on June 3, 1861. She had been a pilot-boat before the war, and was not in any sense a blockade-runner except for the fact that she had escaped from Charleston and made the open sea. It was intended that she should intercept American merchant vessels, and she was practically a privateer. She had already made one or two prizes when, mistaking the Perry for a merchantman, she suffered
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
essel Hatteras. The At Antwerp — U. S. S. Niagara and the fight that was not fought No soonethe first week in February, 1865, the frigate Niagara and the sloop-of-war Sacramento found her andd for action. Commander T. T. Craven, of the Niagara, had already notified his Government that in would be a match for three such ships as the Niagara. Twice when the sea was rough he had stood oailure to engage the Confederate ram with the Niagara and Sacramento and was exonerated of all blam should have proved inaccurate. Although the Niagara was rated as one of the most powerful vessels time was still further disadvantageous. The Niagara could not turn around in less than fifteen mid in a minute and a half. The battery of the Niagara had been condemned as unserviceable by a boar was threatened by the United States warships Niagara and Sacramento. But Commodore Thomas T. Craven of the Niagara decided that the Stonewall in a fight ought to be more than a match for three such[3 more...]