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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 14 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 14 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 4 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 4 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 2 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley). You can also browse the collection for Caucasus or search for Caucasus in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 103 (search)
earmen and archers and cavalry: before this they were all mingled together in confusion. This was the king who fought against the Lydians when the day was turned to night in the battle, and who united under his dominion all of Asia that is beyond the river Halys. Collecting all his subjects, he marched against Ninus, wanting to avenge his father and to destroy the city. He defeated the Assyrians in battle; but while he was besieging their city, a great army of Scythians came down upon him, led by their king Madyes son of Protothyes. They had invaded Asia after they had driven the Cimmerians out of Europe: pursuing them in their flight, the Scythians came to the Median country.This is the same story as that related in the early chapters of Book IV. The Scythians, apparently, marched eastwards along the northern slope of the Caucasus, turning south between the end of the range and the Caspian. But Herodotus' geography in this story is difficult to follow.—The “Saspires” are in Arme
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 203 (search)
but the Caspian is separate and by itself. Its length is what a ship rowed by oars can traverse in fifteen days, and its breadth, where it is broadest, is an eight days' journey. Along its western shore stretches the range of Caucasus, which has more and higher peaks than any other range. Many and all kinds of nations dwell in the Caucasus, and the most of them live on the fruits of the forest. Here, it is said, are trees growing leaves that men crush and mix with water and use for painting fige of Caucasus, which has more and higher peaks than any other range. Many and all kinds of nations dwell in the Caucasus, and the most of them live on the fruits of the forest. Here, it is said, are trees growing leaves that men crush and mix with water and use for painting figures on their clothing; these figures cannot be washed out, but last as long as the wool, as if they had been woven into it from the first. Men and women here (they say) have intercourse openly, like beasts of the flock.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 204 (search)
This sea called Caspian is hemmed in to the west by the Caucasus: towards the east and the sunrise there stretches from its shores a boundless plain as far as the eye can see. The greater part of this wide plain is the country of the Massagetae, against whom Cyrus was eager to lead his army. For there were many weighty reasons that impelled and encouraged him to do so: first, his birth, because of which he seemed to be something more than mortal; and next, his victories in his wars: for no nation that Cyrus undertook to attack could escape from him.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 3, chapter 97 (search)
sThe choenix was a measure of about the capacity of a quart. of unrefined gold, two hundred blocks of ebony, five Ethiopian boys, and twenty great elephants' tusks. Gifts were also required of the Colchians and their neighbors as far as the Caucasus mountains (which is as far as the Persian rule reaches, the country north of the Caucasus paying no regard to the Persians); these were rendered every four years and are still rendered, namely, a hundred boys and as many maids. The Arabians rendered boys, and twenty great elephants' tusks. Gifts were also required of the Colchians and their neighbors as far as the Caucasus mountains (which is as far as the Persian rule reaches, the country north of the Caucasus paying no regard to the Persians); these were rendered every four years and are still rendered, namely, a hundred boys and as many maids. The Arabians rendered a thousand talents' weight of frankincense yearly. Such were the gifts of these peoples to the king, besides the tribute.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 4, chapter 12 (search)
And to this day there are Cimmerian walls in Scythia, and a Cimmerian ferry, and there is a country CimmeriaThe name survives in “Crimea.” The “Cimmerian ferry” is probably the narrow entrance of the Sea of Azov. and a strait named Cimmerian. Furthermore, it is evident that the Cimmerians in their flight from the Scythians into Asia also made a colony on the peninsula where the Greek city of Sinope has since been founded; and it is clear that the Scythians pursued them and invaded Media, missing their way; for the Cimmerians always fled along the coast, and the Scythians pursued with the Caucasus on their right until they came into the Median land, turning inland on their way. That is the other story current among Greeks and foreigners