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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Contents   page Map--Theatre of Georgia and the Carolinas CAMPAIGNS2 Frontispiece--A shot that Startled WASHINGTON4 introduction   Frederick Dent Grant13 Part I Grant Versus Lee   Henry W. Elson   the battle in the WILDERNESS21  Spotsylvania and the Bloody Angle51  attack and repulse at Cold Harbor79 Part II the simultaneous movements   Henry W. Elson   Drewry's Bluff IMPREGNABLE93  to Atlanta — Sherman Versus JOHNSTON99  the last conflicts in the SHENANDOAH139 Part III closing in   Henry W. Elson   Charleston, the unconquered PORT169  the investment of Petersburg175  Sherman's final CAMPAIGNS209 Part IV from war to peace   Henry W. Elson   Nashville — the end in Tennessee   the siege and fall of Petersburg   Appomattox  Part V engagements of the Civil War from May, 1864, to May, 1865   George L. Kilmer  Photographic descriptions thr
ning and a volley burst forth and struck the officers. When the smoke lifted Longstreet and Jenkins were down — the former seriously wounded, and the latter killed outright. As at Chancellorsville a year before and on the same battleground, a great captain of the Confederacy was shot down by his own men, and by accident, at the crisis of a battle. Jackson lingered several days after Chancellorsville, while Longstreet recovered and lived to fight for the Confederacy till the surrender at Appomattox. General Wadsworth, of Hancock's corps, was mortally wounded during the day, while making a daring assault on the Confederate works, at the head of his men. During the afternoon, the Confederate attack upon Hancock's and Burnside's forces, which constituted nearly half the entire army, was so severe that the Federal lines began to give way. The combatants swayed back and forth;the Confederates seized the Federal breastworks repeatedly, only to be repulsed again and again. Once, the So
s run on a flat-car from point to point on a curve of the Railroad track along the bank of the Appomattox. It was manned and served before Petersburg, July 9-31, 1864, by Company G, First Connecticut its formidable adversary.--Lieutenant-General James Longstreet, C. S. A., in From Manassas to Appomattox. the disastrous failure of the Union Army on the sanguinary battlefield of Cold Harbor, incity of Petersburg is situated twenty-one miles South of Richmond on the Southern bank of the Appomattox, a small stream threading its way through the Virginia tidewater belt, almost parallel with thlorn hope of Lee's beleaguered army. Fort McGilvery was less than one-half a mile from the Appomattox River, just north of the city Point Railroad, at the extreme right of the Federal line. It was oands and forced to retreat.--Lieutenant-General James Longstreet, C. S.A., in From Manassas to Appomattox. While Hood was turning back from Atlanta in the great northward movement, which, in the h
ound mortar, Dictator, was run on a flat-car from point to point on a curve of the Railroad track along the bank of the Appomattox. It was manned and served before Petersburg, July 9-31, 1864, by Company G, First Connecticut artillery, during its stmust bite the dust before its formidable adversary.--Lieutenant-General James Longstreet, C. S. A., in From Manassas to Appomattox. the disastrous failure of the Union Army on the sanguinary battlefield of Cold Harbor, in June, 1864, destroyed Gr6th of June. The little city of Petersburg is situated twenty-one miles South of Richmond on the Southern bank of the Appomattox, a small stream threading its way through the Virginia tidewater belt, almost parallel with the James, into which it flown line. It was the forlorn hope of Lee's beleaguered army. Fort McGilvery was less than one-half a mile from the Appomattox River, just north of the city Point Railroad, at the extreme right of the Federal line. It was one of the earliest forts
Negley, the imposing defense of Nashville Fort Negley, the imposing defense of Nashville The Army of Tennessee under General Hood, pursuing its march northward late in November and early in December, came upon the Federal forces under General Schofield at Franklin, and General Thomas at Nashville, Tennessee, where desperate battles were fought, until Hood's army was reduced to skeleton commands and forced to retreat.--Lieutenant-General James Longstreet, C. S.A., in From Manassas to Appomattox. While Hood was turning back from Atlanta in the great northward movement, which, in the hopes of the Confederacy, would bring the Army of Tennessee to the banks of the Ohio, there was gathering at and around Nashville a force to dispute the progress of Hood. General Thomas was sent by Sherman to take care of Tennessee, and he was preparing to weld many fragmentary bodies of troops into a fighting army. After a month of bold maneuvering, the advance of Hood's army appeared, on the
ht have been seen from the north bank of the Appomattox, looking south over the ruined town in Aprilthe siege of Petersburg came to an end. Appomattox View of field artillery In the sing, dignified, simple, heroic. I refer to Appomattox. Two men met that day, representative of Amar, at Sailor's Creek, a tributary of the Appomattox River. Ewell was surrounded by the Federals anhe advantage On the line of pursuit Appomattox River, Grant sent to Lee a courteous request foility of it all and Pursuit of Lee to Appomattox. The roads leading west from Petersburg ct that delayed Grant's pursuit The flooded Appomattox ordered a truce. A meeting with Grant was he two world-famous commanders took place at Appomattox, a small settlement with only one street, buiers who performed one of the last duties at Appomattox: a detail of the Twenty-sixth Michigan hande operations McLean removed to the village of Appomattox and spent nearly four years tranquilly enoug[4 more...]
or — being cheated of his sleep, and forced to put up with the irregularities of Camp life was not such a shock for him as for the to bed with the chickens and up with the lark countryman. This is no assuming of facts — it is the result of experience and record. But here are men of city, farm, and backwoods who have become case-hardened to the rugged life. Siege of Petersburg. Thus we see Petersburg as, with a powerful glass, it might have been seen from the north bank of the Appomattox, looking south over the ruined town in April, 1865. As the railroad center south of Richmond, it was, at the outbreak of the war, one of the largest cities of Virginia. It was Grant who first utilized its importance in leading up to the capture of the capital. Although all missiles apparently evince a selective intelligence, at times in any bombardment there are naturally objects which give range to the gunners and become targets for their aim. Chimneys and smokestacks, and, alas! in s
Appomattox View of field artillery In the wake of Lee's retreat the ruins of railroasing, dignified, simple, heroic. I refer to Appomattox. Two men met that day, representative of Amar, at Sailor's Creek, a tributary of the Appomattox River. Ewell was surrounded by the Federals anhe advantage On the line of pursuit Appomattox River, Grant sent to Lee a courteous request foility of it all and Pursuit of Lee to Appomattox. The roads leading west from Petersburg che two world-famous commanders took place at Appomattox, a small settlement with only one street, buurably to restore good feeling and to Appomattox. At this railroad point, three miles fromiers who performed one of the last duties at Appomattox: a detail of the Twenty-sixth Michigan hande operations McLean removed to the village of Appomattox and spent nearly four years tranquilly enougrican history. associate for all time with Appomattox the memory of reunion rather than of strife.[3 more...]
ay, here preserved. The return of the soldiers — the grand review The return of the soldiers — the grand review, a few seconds after the previous figure. April 6, 1865: Sailor's Creek, Va. Union, Second and Sixth Corps and Sheridan's Cav.; Confed., Gen. R. S. Ewell's command, and part of Gen. R. H. Anderson's. Losses: Union, 166 killed, 1014 wounded; Confed., 6000 killed, wounded, and captured. (Federal estimate.) April 7, 1865: high bridge and Farmville, Appomattox River, Va. Union, Second Corps and portion of Twenty-fourth Corps; Confed., rearguard of Gordon's and Longstreet's Corps and Fitzhugh Lee's Cav. Losses: Union, 571 killed, 71 wounded, and missing; Confed. No record found. April 8-9, 1865: Appomattox C. H., Va. Union, Twenty-fourth Corps, one division of the Twenty-fifth Corps and Sheridan's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's Cav. Losses: Union, 200 killed and wounded; Confed., 500 killed and wounded. April 9,