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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Petersburg, June, 1864, to the surrender at Appomattox in April, 1865. Among its killed were: Ca till the end; and was fighting gallantly at Appomattox when the flag of truce called the halt whichs around Petersburg until the final scene at Appomattox. Capts. T. C. Daniel and William T. King weanding regiment. Perry's brigade paroled at Appomattox, April 9, 1865. The Forty-Fifth Alabama ir commanding regiment when it was paroled at Appomattox. Capts. A. C. Menefee was killed at Cedar Rburg road, and Farmville, and surrendered at Appomattox, in Perry's brigade, with the other Alabama 's Run and White Oak road. It was engaged at Appomattox and surrendered as part of Gordon's corps, Gely at White Oak road and Hatcher's Run. At Appomattox, it is said, the men were huzzaing over a cat. David A. Clark died of wounds received at Appomattox. Extracts from official war Records. y's; a mere handful remained to surrender at Appomattox. Major Stallworth, as a captain in Hilliard[10 more...]
nd suffered severely at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania and a great number of smaller engagements, finally surrendering at Appomattox. At the battle of Gettysburg it was called Hurt's battery, Captain Hardaway having been promoted. to lieutenant-colonel and placed in command of a battalion,in this battle. Capt. John W. Tullis was wounded and captured at Gettysburg. Lieut. George A. Ferrell was in command of the battery when it was surrendered at Appomattox. Extracts from official war Records. Vol. XI, Part 1—(946) In D. H. Hill's division, at Seven Pines. Vol. XI, Part 2—(485) In D. H. Hill's division, Sperations of July 24, 1864. No. 89—(1355) McIntosh's battalion, January 2, 1865, on or near James river. No. 95—(1273) Lieut. Geo. A. Ferrell, Lee's army, Appomattox. Waters' battery. Waters' battery was organized in Mobile in 1861, and was there, 129 strong, early in 1862. It was in Corinth in the spring of
service was not again interrupted by wounds. He was with his men in the trenches near Petersburg, led them at Hatcher's Run, High bridge and Farmville, and at Appomattox. Though the remnants of his brigade, the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Thirteenth and Fourteenth regiments, hardly equaled the number of one full regiment, irving in the trenches around Petersburg during the winter of 1864-65, he was present at the final struggle on these lines. Just one day before the surrender at Appomattox he was captured, being at the time sick and with the wagon train. Subsequently, he went to Mobile and engaged in business. In the summer of 1866, while in Newhe close of the war Colonel Perry led this famous brigade of Alabamians, though he did not receive his commission as brigadier-general until February, 1865. At Appomattox, so well were the discipline and morale of the brigade preserved, that it was one of the largest brigades in the army of Northern Virginia paroled after the mem