hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How General A. P. Hill met his fate. (search)
obtained of Sergeant Mauk the statement which is here included. The paper has been furnished through one who saw some arduous service under General Hill, and as Captain in Dibrell's Cavalry accompanied President Davis after the surrender at Appomattox in his flight beyond Charlotte, N. C.; who has served since as Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery in the Maryland Line, and is now First Lieutenant-Commander of Isaac R. Trimble Camp, Confederate Veterans, and the member from Maryland of the Histoof the embattled line, had entered upon the final struggle. A portion of General Lee's forces held the cordon of strong forts which had been thrown around Petersburg, forming as it were a gigantic horse-shoe, with the corkers resting on the Appomatox river and covering the roads to Richmond. Grant's guns had been pounding away at the toe of the horseshoe for nine months, with no appreciable effect. The Southside Railroad runs westward from Petersburg and connects with the Richmond and Danv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
The Fifteenth Virginia. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, November 12, 1899.] Composed of Richmond, Henrico and Hanover boys. Career of this gallant regiment. Incidents of the capture of Harper's Ferry and the bloody battle of Sharpsburg—Colonel Vance and Molly Cottontail. I want to tell what I know about the part taken in the Sharpsburg campaign by the 15th Virginia Infantry, whose rifles cracked from Bethel to Appomattox. There were eight companies in the regiment, organized and composed of men from Richmond and vicinity—to-wit: Company A, Church Hill, city; Company B, Virginia Life Guard, city; Company C, Patrick Henry Rifles, Hanover; Company D, Old Dominion Guard, city; Company E, Ashland Grays, Hanover; Company G, Henrico Southern Guard, Henrico; Company H, Young Guard, city; Company I, Hanover Grays, Hanover. Having lost its colonel (T. P. August, wounded) and major (John Stewart Walker, killed at Malvern Hill), the regiment recruited and reorganized,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
In the Confederate Veteran for August, Captain William Kaigler, of Dawson, Ga., insists that the last volley at Appomattox was fired by the sharpshooters of Evans's division under his command, and not by North Carolinians. The closing incideby several North Carolina officers, among them being General W. R. Cox, whose brigade they say fired the last volley at Appomattox. In his last communication Captain Kaigler says that General Cox is liable to be mistaken, because his statement is one's History of North Carolina. It was my privilege to be an active participant in that memorable morning's scenes at Appomattox as one of the staff of Majorral Bryan Grimes, and it fell to my lot to carry the last order on the field of battle immverted question by the witness best qualified to know—General Bryan Grimes—who planned and commanded the last charge at Appomattox. I enclose, therefore, the following extract from Grimes's own report, or statement, published in 1879, and never qu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The surrender at Appomattox. (search)
The surrender at Appomattox. (by General Bryan Grimes.) On Saturday, the 8th, no enemy appeared, and we marched undisturbed all day. Up to this time, since the evacuation of Petersburg, we had marched day and night, continually followed and harassed by the enemy. The men were very much jaded and suffering for necessary sustenance, our halts not having been sufficiently long to prepare their food; besides, all our cooking utensils not captured or abandoned were where we could not reach them. This day Bushrod Johnson's division was assigned to and placed under my command, by order of General Lee. Upon passing a clear stream of water, and learning that the other division of the corps had gone into camp some two miles ahead, I concluded to halt and give my broken-down men an opportunity to close up and join us, and sent a message to General Gordon, commanding the corps, making known my whereabouts, informing him I would be at any point he might designate at any hour desired. By
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel John Bowie Magruder. (search)
sent. On July 3rd, Armistead's brigade reported to General Longstreet, near Temperance Hall, about three miles from Shirley, nearly opposite the mouth of the Appomattox, and was put under the command of General A. P. Hill until the 11th of July. Captain Magruder was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, July 31st, 1862. On the 23dho could defend the reputation of men who never had cause to be ashamed of their actions—their deeds then and forever will speak for themselves. From Bethel to Appomattox their grand leader and their country was proud of them, and they never had cause to blush with shame themselves. It is true that there were many stragglers (ver whipped us, but wore us out; and on April 8th and 9th of 1865, there was as much fight in the eight or ten thousand veterans who had followed General Lee to Appomattox as there had ever been, and some as gallant stands made by these men then as can be found in the pages of history. We were overwhelmed by numbers in the army
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
ce an article on the battle of Sharpsburg, which appeared in the Confederate column of the Richmond Dispatch, stated that the writer for the first time had cause to be ashamed of the Confederate soldier. Ever since I have waited for some one to notice this criticism—some one whose knowledge of the facts was greater than mine, and who could defend the reputation of men who never had cause to be ashamed of their actions—their deeds then and forever will speak for themselves. From Bethel to Appomattox their grand leader and their country was proud of them, and they never had cause to blush with shame themselves. It is true that there were many stragglers (not deserters), or General McClellan would have found out before the second day after the battle that he could claim a victory. These men, please bear in mind, had in about eight weeks marched from Richmond to Frederick, Md.; had fought and won the battles of Cedar Creek, Second Manassas, Chantilly, Harper's Ferry, South Mountain—t<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
ossed the Atlantic for the purpose of raising the blockade at Port Royal and other seaports on the Atlantic coast, but, on entering the harbor of Havana for supplies, there learned of the conclusion of the war and the surrender of Lee's army at Appomattox. The vessel was then bonded to the Captain-General of Cuba for the sum of $16,000, with which her officers and crew were paid off and discharged. The Stonewall was subsequently surrendered to the United States government, and by that governmey anchored at Nassau early in May. Here the officers and crew were plunged into inexpressible sadness, hearing there for the first time that President Davis was in chains, President Lincoln had been assassinated, General Lee had surrendered at Appomattox, and the whole Confederate government had been crushed. It was with a sad heart that Captain Page headed for Havana, where he hoped to obtain from the Confederate agent at that place money with which to pay off his men. The agent professed t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The monument to Mosby's men. (search)
y and truth. I have no more use for such a New South than I have for the socalled new woman. If, on the other hand, these writers, when they speak of tile Southern Confederacy as the New South, mean that our boys accepted the surrender at Appomattox in good faith, and that when Lee, that grandest of our great men, sheathed his sword at Appomattox, that they returned home and beat their implements of war into plowshares and pruning hooks, and that all, even those who had never known aught sAppomattox, that they returned home and beat their implements of war into plowshares and pruning hooks, and that all, even those who had never known aught save luxury, they and their wives, their sons and their daughters, worked as man never worked before, obeying the laws of their country and administering the same as soon as they were permitted to do so, then I would pronounce a long and a loud Amen. The old Confederates. Who since the war have been our legislators, our judges, cur juries, our merchants, our mechanics, our miners, our ministers. These have chiefly been the old Confeds. It may be they were maimed and disfigured, but thei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
One of Col. John S. Mosby's companies. [from the Richmond, Va., Times, January 29, 1899.] The following roster of Company F, Mosby's battalion, contains the name of those who composed the company in the fall of 1864 and up to the time of the surrender at Appomattox. It is taken from the roll-book of the company, which was kept by Sergeant Jesse P. Gore, brother of Officer Charles A. Gore, of this city. Sergeant Gore died about two years ago, and the book became the property of Officer Gore, who prizes it as a souvenir of the war. The roll contains the names of quite a number of residents of this section, though many have passed away. Officers. Captain—W. E. Franklin. First Lieutenant—Walter Barrett. Second Lieutenant—James T. Ames. Third Lieutenant—J. Frank Turner. First Sergeant—H. M. McIlhaney. Second Sergeant—Robert Parrott. Third Sergeant—Thomas A. Russell. Fourth Sergeant—John J. Williams. Fifth Sergeant—James P. Triplett. E.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
d, and succeed in absolutely blocking Lee's further progress from Appomattox. The contract suggested by this statement of the relative meaner, he did extricate himself, and marched his diminishing army to Appomattox, hungry and worn, badgered and fighting at every step, like a wouhe fact, and solution of the problem, of Lee's army ever reaching Appomattox. We are not, however, writing the history of the campaign nor demmand parked about two miles beyond the courthouse on the road to Appomattox Station. While I was with him, an attack wholly unexpected was ted to break through the cordon of enemies blocking every road at Appomattox. Their last shot had been fired by this company, that had seen a coming dawn found the company still trudging on the road between Appomattox and somewhere else, probably Lynchburg, and the rising sun has seee companies of the Howitzers. The second and third companies were with the main body of the army, and were surrendered at Appomattox. C. P.
1 2