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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Prison reminiscences. (search)
her, Rev. Wm. A. Crocker, who was living the other side of Campbell Court House, and with whom was my dear mother. I took the stage to Pittsylvania Court House. When I reached there, I learned that Lee's army was operating in the direction of Appomattox. While waiting there a few days in uncertainty, a section of a battery was drawn up in the Court House square, abandoned and disbanded. While the men were unhitching the horses, I said to them that I had $100 in Confederate notes in my pockethis horse, and rode him bareback to my brother's. On my way I met large bodies of unarmed soldiers going South to their homes. Their silent walk and sad faces told of a sorrow in their hearts. These were Lee's men. They had surrendered at Appomattox their arms but not their honor. They were heroes—but they were not conscious of it. They were unconscious of their fame and glory. These were they of whom the world was to declare they made defeat as illustrious as victory. When I came in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The address of Hon. John Lamb. (search)
ailors who fell under the banner of the Lost Cause forty years ago. We cannot call their names. They are too numerous to be mentioned. All honor to the heroes who gave their lives to the cause of Constitutional Government. We tell of their fate without a sigh. They were spared from witnessing the glorious flag furled. A large number of these did not turn from the fated field of Gettysburg, as did some here, with the burning thought that Some one had blundered The tragic scenes at Appomattox could leave no regretful and sorrowful memories in their hearts and lives. As the mists of the past are rolled away, Our heroes who died in their tattered gray, Grow taller and greater in all their parts, Till they fill our minds, as they filled our hearts; And for them who lament them there is this relief, That glory sits by the side of grief, And they grow taller as the years pass by And the world learns how they could do or die. Private soldiers and sailors. We sing praises t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical memorial of the Charlotte Cavalry. (search)
burg, Pa., in 1863. It was General John McCausland's extreme rear guard all night and all day for days together, from Covington to Buchanan in June, 1864, when General Hunter advanced on Lynchburg, Va. When Chambersburg, Pa. was burnt in 1864, this squadron acted as General McCausland's extreme rear guard when McCausland left the burning city. From Five Forks, Va., near Petersburg, it was again often in the rear of Beale's Brigade (to which it had been transferred) in Lee's retreat to Appomattox. On the morning of the surrender, 9th April, 1865, this squadron was with its regiment, the 14th Virginia Cavalry, in the last charge made by that regiment under command of Captain E. E. Bouldin. On very many other occasions, these two companies were assigned the posts of danger and hardship. They acted nearly always together. So that in most, if not all instances, the Churchville Cavalry was engaged along with the Charlotte Cavalry in battles and skirmishes enumerated below, and its
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Townsend's Diary—JanuaryMay, 1865. (search)
Townsend's Diary—January–May, 1865. From Petersburg to Appomattox, thence to North Carolina to join Johnston's Army. By Harry C. Townsend, Corporal 1st Company, Richmond Howitzers. January 1st, 1865, Friday. Lying encamped in winter quarters at Mrs. Dunn's farm, near Port Walthall Junction, and about five miles northeast of Petersburg. The quiet of the military atmosphere remains undisturbed. We are living in the hope of receiving and eating a large New Year's dinner, which the citizens of Virginia promise. 2d. This has been a day of disappointment. Our expected dinner was delayed until patience was exhausted, and then when it came it was of such meagre dimensions that we concluded to give our portion to the other companies of the battalion. We bore our disappointment quite well however under the circumstances. 3d-11th. All quiet. Succession of rains and warm sunny days. 12th. Went to Richmond (on mail pass) and returned on the 13th, finding everything in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
ast fight. From the Times-dispatch, July 29, 1906. John William Ashby is man who fell at Appomattox in Gordon's last assault. This question now settled once for All—Also the last Federal soldier killed. The Confederate soldier Ashby, whose gravestone at Appomattox bears the mark of Second Virginia Cavalry, was not of that regiment. Inquiry has elicited the well verified statemeny, July I, 1906, I noticed your inquiry, To what company and regiment Ashby, who was killed at Appomattox, belonged? Buckner Ashby, a wealthy farmer, resided near Stone Bridge, Clark county, Va., bef Virginia Cavalry, in April, 1862, and served his country well up to the time of his death, at Appomattox, April 9, 1865. He had participated in many hard fought engagements before the final campaign from Five Forks to Appomattox. Directly after the Beverley raid in January, 1865, our regiment the Twelfth, was furloughed home for some weeks on account 0f the scarcity of forage. At the prope
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
From Petersburg to Appomattox. From the Times-dispatch, October 28, 1906. Lampkin's Battery of ArtillFort Harrison, on the north side of the James, to Appomattox, is by Lieutenant Fletcher T. Massie, of that splime being. We marched on together, crossing Appomattox River on a ferryboat near High Bridge, and got to Fass along the line of our subsequent march towards Appomattox. (General Lee looked as he always did, and showednd we marched about a mile farther on the road to Appomattox. I now saw a section of artillery—that is, two gmen. At nightfall we resumed our march towards Appomattox. During Saturday we were on the march, without i the evening we heard the guns of a skirmish near Appomattox. We halted about nightfall, about a mile before reaching Appomattox, and for the first time during the retreat the harness was taken off of the horses that caried Colonel Haskell's guns. Thin gray line at Appomattox. On the morning of April 9th, the day of surre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
Advance from Appomattox. From the Richmond News-leader, January 21, 1907. John Skelton Willh. The address follows: Our advance from Appomattox. General Lee was one of the few men who hthe wilderness. Lee was sent to the rear at Appomattox, but Lee's men and Lee's woman have come steecitation of the results of our advance from Appomattox. We have overcome obstacles set thick and ds. Yet, it is now scarcely forty years from Appomattox, and the South has regained all her losses ania, as they followed to the gloomy glory of Appomattox, Lee's people have pressed and striven and climbed from Appomattox to and now are through the clouds and toward the crest, in the full glow of tbeen Grant instead of Lee who surrendered at Appomattox, we of the South probably would have erred ioo, have done our patient part by him. Since Appomattox the Southern white man has spent, as nearly the only right of the States surrendered at Appomattox. The other rights promised by the Constitut[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
plicate of the enclosed list of members of Company D, Fourth Virginia Infantry (Stonewall Brigade), it has occurred to me to send it to you and ask you to, some time or another, give it a place in the Confederate column of your paper. Its publication is desired not alone because it gives the names enrolled on Orderly Sergeant's book, but because it embraces information of some who are dead and others living, which will be intensely interesting to many widely scattered since the parting at Appomattox in 1865. Most respectfully, Marion, Va., 1902. Jno. S. Apperson. A. G. Pendleton, captain; major 1862; resigned; died in Roanoke, Va., 1902. James W. Kennedy, first lieutenant; retired 1862; died in Tennessee after the war. A. E. Gibson, second lieutenant; captain 1862; killed near Groveton, Second Manassas. J. J. Bishop, first sergeant; died from wounds Second Manassas. J. M. Fuller, second sergeant; wounded Gettysburg. F. W. Rider, third sergeant; died after war.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
s, 343. Alexander, General E. P., 246. Allan, Colonel, Wm., 2. Alien, Colonel J. W., 263. Appomattox Advance from, Development of the south since, 336. Appomattox, Thin gray line at 246. Armistead, General L. A., Death of, 29. Army of Northern Virginia, Chaplains of the, 190. Ashby, John William, last man killed at Appomattox, 218. Averill General W. W., 206, 209. Baker, Colonel E. D., a spectacular hero, 271. Ball's Bluff, Men of Virginia at, Battle of, 254. Ball, Colonel W. B., 274. Barksdale General Wm., 264. Bartlett, General, Wm. Francis, 273. Battery No. 19, 83. Beale, Rev. G. W., 210. Beale, General R. L. T 75, 1 General, Judson, 180. Lackland, Colonel, 366. Lacy, Chaplain B. T., 6. Lamb, Hon., John, Address of, 57. Lampkin's Battery, Retreat of from Petersburg to Appomattox, 243 Last Confederate and Federal soldier, respectively, killed, 218. Lee's Rangers, A noted (company, 179, 277. Lee, General Fitzhugh 11, 12, 20,.