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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 2 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 2 0 Browse Search
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or's House. Here, for the first time, were appointed overseers of the poor, distinct from the selectmen, who were charged with providing everything necessary for the support of the poor, and the appointment of a physician. This served the purpose till 1818, when a third was built in the square bounded by Harvard, Norfolk, Austin, and Prospect streets. In 1836 this last was burned with one of its wretched inmates. Then followed a larger and much better building of brick on the banks of Charles River, where the Riverside Press now stands. It was well arranged and well managed, and some parts of the building still remain. This beautiful spot was abandoned in 1849 for the present stone structure in the northwest corner of the city, adjoining the Somerville line. Besides the public provisions for the sick poor, other charities have been created in Cambridge by bequests and gifts. That of John Foster for the poor of the First Parish; of Levi Bridge under the care of the overseers
ollows:— New England Lodge, No. 4, instituted July 21, 1827, 274 members; Friendship Lodge, No. 20, instituted September 26, 1843, 365 members; Mount Auburn Lodge, No. 94, instituted October 15, 1845, 113 members; Cambridge Lodge, No. 13, instituted September 2, 1874, 240 members; Mount Sinai Lodge, No. 169, instituted September 23, 1874, 205 members; Dunster Lodge, No. 220, instituted July 11, 1893, 184 members; New England Encampment, No. 34, instituted October 3, 1865, 149 members; Charles River Encampment, No. 22, instituted September 1, 1846, 176 members; Olive Branch Rebekah Lodge, No. 21, instituted March 13, 1874, 143 members; Amity Rebekah Lodge, No. 15, instituted June 29, 1871, 189 members. Friendship Lodge celebrated its fiftieth anniversary in 1893 at Union Hall, which was one of the most elaborate and largely attended celebrations of any organization in the history of our city. Two large and handsome buildings, one in Cambridgeport, the other in North Cambridge,
cept the presidency of the newly organized Charles River Bank. Judge Fay followed Deacon Farwell, ere $82,950, with deposits of $299,390. Charles River Bank Charles River Bank.—The first meetCharles River Bank.—The first meeting for the purpose of organization was held March 13, 1832, in the office of Levi Farwell, at whic rooms in the building now occupied by the Charles River National Bank, and owned by Harvard Univerat the same meeting, which was held at the Charles River Bank, it was voted that the treasurer be aday: This press stands by the side of the Charles River; why not call it The Riverside Press? andy finally decided that on the banks of the Charles River, within a radius of one mile from the Stathe residence of Mr. Clark, on the shore of Charles River, at the foot of Brookline Street. They areg others engaged in stone working are: The Charles River Stone Co., Austin Ford & Son, R. J. Rutherhis culminated in the incorporation of the Charles River Railroad in 1881. Tracks were laid by thi[8 more...]<
eport National, 302; Lechmere, 303; National City, 303; Charles River National, 304; First National, 305; Cambridge National,e submerged territory, 105; scheme of development, 106; Charles River Embankment Company, 106, 107; location of the bridge, 1ed to suppress the Company of Massachusetts Bay, 1. Charles River Bank, 304. Charles River embankment, advantages as aCharles River embankment, advantages as a place of residence, 127. Charles River Embankment Company, 106, 107. Charles River Encampment, 286. Charles River NCharles River Embankment Company, 106, 107. Charles River Encampment, 286. Charles River National Bank, 304. Charles River Railroad, 399. Charlestown, 1; assembling of General Court at, 2; trail to Watertown, 3;Charles River Encampment, 286. Charles River National Bank, 304. Charles River Railroad, 399. Charlestown, 1; assembling of General Court at, 2; trail to Watertown, 3; General Gage removes powder from, 23; becomes a city, 54. Charlestown highway (Kirkland Street), 8. Cheeshahteaumuck, Charles River National Bank, 304. Charles River Railroad, 399. Charlestown, 1; assembling of General Court at, 2; trail to Watertown, 3; General Gage removes powder from, 23; becomes a city, 54. Charlestown highway (Kirkland Street), 8. Cheeshahteaumuck, Caleb, the one Indian graduate of Harvard, 10. Cheverus, Cardinal, 245. Christ Church, founding of, 13; its chime of beCharles River Railroad, 399. Charlestown, 1; assembling of General Court at, 2; trail to Watertown, 3; General Gage removes powder from, 23; becomes a city, 54. Charlestown highway (Kirkland Street), 8. Cheeshahteaumuck, Caleb, the one Indian graduate of Harvard, 10. Cheverus, Cardinal, 245. Christ Church, founding of, 13; its chime of bells, 13; occupied by the Continental Army, 49; opened for service, 239; Dr. Hoppin's ministry, 239. Churches, Catholic: Fi
ifflin & Co., 334-336. Pumps. Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Co., 353. Rubber goods. American Rubber Co., 381. Shoe blacking and Metal Polish. W. W. Reid Manufacturing Co., 395. Soap. Carr Brothers, 362. Curtis Davis & Co., 358. James C. Davis & Co., 359. C. L. Jones & Co., 361. Lysander Kemp & Sons, 360. Charles R. Teele, 362. Spring-Beds. Howe Spring-Bed Co., 393. New England Spring-Bed Co., 392. Stone work. William A. Bertsch, 389. Charles River Stone Co., 389. Connecticut Steam Stone Co., 389. Austin Ford & Son. 389. A. Higgins & Co., 389. John J. Horgan. 389. Alexander McDonald & Son, 388. R. J. Rutherford. 389. Union Marble and Granite Works, 389. Sugar. Revere Sugar Refinery, 394. Telescopes. Alvan Clark & Sons, 379. Tin cans. Charles E. Pierce & Co., 393. Tinware. Dover Stamping Co., 389. Seavey Manufacturing Co., 390. Turning. Standard Turning Works, 390. Twine. America
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
which he met the fresh blows showered upon him, but in the renewed activity of his muse—this last being also a sign of good physical condition. No fewer than five sonnets proceeded from him in December—partly contributed to the Liberator, Lib. 10.199, 207; 11.3, 4. and partly to the Liberty Bell, the annual publication of the Anti-Slavery Fair, under the auspices of Mrs. Chapman. We can fancy him composing them on his lonely midnight walks across the long bridge to Cambridge, over the Charles River. These two, the best of the five, if not at his high-water mark, have, perhaps, a claim to be quoted: Sonnet to Liberty. They tell me, Liberty! that, in thy name, Lib. 11.4; Writings of W. L. G., p. 135. I may not plead for all the human race; That some are born to bondage and disgrace, Some to a heritage of woe and shame, And some to power supreme, and glorious fame. With my whole soul I spurn the doctrine base, And, as an equal brotherhood, embrace All people, and for all fa
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
, Mrs. J. M., 284, 295, 296. Campbell, Thomas, 15. Canning, George, 23. Carlyle, Thomas, 77, 272, 278, 279, 280, 285, 296, 304, 332. Carpenter, Mr., 233. Carter, Charles P., 232. Carter family, the, 75. Cary, Alice, 134. Cary, Phoebe, 134. Cayley, Mr., 289. Channing, Barbara, 83, 84. Channing, E. T., 49, 52, 53, 57. Channing, Ellery, 169, 174. Channing, W. F., 159, 160, 176. Channing, W. H., 43, 44, 97, 002, 114, 120, 175, 327. Chapman, George, 95. Chapman, J. J., 190. Charles River the, 96. Chaucer, Geofrey, 92. Cheney, John, 176. Child of the college, A, 38-68. Child, F. J., 52, 53, 336. Child, Mrs., Lydia Maria, 77, 102, 126. Choules, J. O., 175. Christ, Jesus, s18. Church of the Disciples, the, 97. Cicero, 171. Cinderella, 253. Civil War, the, 235-270. Clapp, Henry, 85. Claretie, Jules, 313. Clarke, Edward, 62. Clarke, J. F., 86, 97, 98, 244. Clarkson, Thomas, 327. Clay, Henry, 136. Clemens, S. L. (Mark Twain), 284. Cleveland,
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, II: an old-fashioned home (search)
Mr. Morse begun with the dining-room, then went to the back parlour and then to the study. The champagne bottles sold for 4 1/8 cents apiece; the clock for $3 3/4; and a little table in there for 1 cent. ... There was an old curious chair, which Mr. Morse finding he could not sell, broke. I was much obliged to him for I got a nice bat by it. Occasionally a bit of autobiography is found among the old letters, as this:— I vividly remember when I first swam above my depth in the Charles River. We boys had been learning to swim at a point in the river not far from the willows where we played and read Spenser's Faerie Queene. The first time I swam across from one point to another in this river was perhaps the proudest moment of my life. I had no feeling of fear, but one of great confidence. All along Mt. Auburn St. on the side bordering the river were apple trees and no houses. At the age of twelve the boy kept a diary of his own, from which it appears that one of his
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, Bibliography (search)
.) Reprinted in Carlyle's Laugh and Other Surprises, 1909. Sellar's Roman Poets of the Republic. (In Atlantic Monthly, Oct.) Short March with the Guard. [Verses.] (In Sword and Pen, Dec. 9.) Book notices and editorials. (In Christian Register, Literary World, Woman's Journal.) 1882 Young Folks' History of the United States. New ed., with additional chapters. Speech at Rev. Samuel Johnson's funeral. (In Samuel Johnson: A Memorial.) Pph. (With Others.) Testimony on Charles River Railroad, Feb. 13. Pph. The Brook Farm Period. (In Demorest's Monthly, July.) First Americans. (In Harper's Monthly Magazine, Aug.) Visit of the Vikings. (In Harper's Monthly Magazine, Sept.) Spanish Discoverers. (In Harper's Monthly Magazine, Oct.) The last three articles were published later in Higginson's Larger History of the United States (1885), and in Higginson and Mac-Donald's History of the United States (1905). The Baby Sorceress. [Sonnet.]. (In Century Ma
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Harriet G. Hosmer. (search)
h him, There is a whole lifetime for the education of the mind; but the body develops in a few years, and, during that time, nothing should be allowed to interfere with its free and healthy growth. In her early childhood Harriet was much abroad, usually accompanied by a little dog, which she tricked out with gay ribbons and small, tinkling bells; while her fearless ways and bright, pleasant features often drew the attention of strangers. Dr. Hosmer's house stood near the bank of the Charles River, and her youth was inured to skating, rowing, and swimming, as well as archery, shooting, and riding. Horse, boat, and weapons were supplied, and diligently she improved them. She became remarkable for dashing boldness, skill, and grace. She could tramp with a hunter, manage her steed like an Arabian, rival the most fearless in the chase, and the best marksmen with gun and pistol, and astonish and alarm her friends by her feats upon and in the water, as agile and varied as those of a
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