Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Coosawhatchie (South Carolina, United States) or search for Coosawhatchie (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
o the Savannah river and up that river to Sister's ferry, the forces at and near Grahamville under the command of Brigadier-General Chestnut, and those at and near Coosawhatchie under Brigadier-General Gartrell. The latter met the advance under General Potter, on the 6th, sending forward a small battalion of the Fifth Georgia, which was soon pressed back. It was reinforced by a section of artillery and the Georgia reserves, but the entire line soon gave way and fell back across the Coosawhatchie river. The battalion of South Carolina cadets was led forward by Maj. John Jenkins to the Tulifinny bridge, but arrived too late to be of service. General Jones then concentrated on the railroad near the Tulifinny trestle all the troops he could collect, Georgia commands, a company of the First artillery, the cadets, and Bachman's battery, and at dawn on the 7th Colonel Edwards, of Georgia, commanding, made an attack upon the enemy in conjunction with a demonstration by Gartrell, but with
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
nization of artillery until the final epoch of the war in the Carolinas, being at the close senior captain in his battalion. He participated in the defense of Port Royal Ferry, January x, 1862, the engagement with the steamer Pawnee on Stono river, the capture of the steamer Isaac P. Smith on the same river, spending three months on duty in Florida, and for six months or more was stationed during the summer of 1864 on the Ashepoo river, taking part in the actions on the Tulifinny and Coosawhatchie rivers; was in the fight at Grimbal's causeway, James island, February, 1865, and the battles of Averasboro and Bentonville. In an attack on the steamer Marblehead, in Stono river, Christmas day, 1863, he received a severe wound in the head. After the close of hostilities he resided at Charleston until 1896. In the following year he made his home at Columbia, and in 1897 he was appointed to the position of chief clerk of the board of control, South Carolina dispensary. The four lieutenan