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The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
It was a task of surpassing difficulty and danger that confronted Captain Buchanan when the Virginia shipped her anchors on March 8, 1862, and steamed down Elizabeth River to fight a fleet of the most powerful line-of-battle ships in the Federal navy, lying under the guns of formidable land batteries. The Virginia's trial trip aleigh, small river steamers mounting rifled 32-pounders in the bow and carrying crews of about forty men, was a surprise. The Merrimac, as she came down the Elizabeth River from Norfolk, had steered very badly. It was necessary for the Beaufort, under command of Lieutenant Parker, to pass her a line in order to keep her head str had made fast towing lines, and they were making every effort to gain the scene of active fighting. Near Sewell's Point, at the south of the James where the Elizabeth River flows into it, was a heavy Confederate battery, mounting, among its other pieces of ordnance, the only 11-inch gun the Confederacy possessed. It was necess
e gave notice of its evacuation, and an advance was made as far as Manassas, but, as appears by General McClellan's report, with no more important design than to attack our rear guard, if it should be encountered. In the report on the conduct of the war by a committee of the United States Congress, evidence is found of much vacillation before the conclusion was finally reached of abandoning the idea of a direct advance upon Richmond for that of concentrating their army at the mouth of the Chesapeake. Whatever doubt or apprehension continued to exist about uncovering the city of Washington by removing their main army from before it, was of course dispelled by the retreat of our army, and the burning of bridges behind it. In this last-mentioned fact, General McClellan says he found the strongest reason to believe that there was no immediate danger of our army returning. There was an apparent advantage to the enemy in the new base for his operations which was sufficiently illustrated
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arnold, Benedict, 1741-1801 (search)
the vicinity (Jan. 5. 1781), he withdrew to Portsmouth, opposite Norfolk, and made that place his headquarters for a while. Earnest efforts were made to capture the marauder, but in vain. Jefferson offered $25,000 for his arrest, and Washington detached Lafayette, with 1,200 men, drawn from the New England and New Jersey levies, who marched to Virginia for that purpose and to protect the State. A portion of the French fleet went from Rhode Island (March 8) to shut Arnold up in the Elizabeth River and assist in capturing him. Steuben, who was recruiting for Greene's army in Virginia, also watched him. The effort failed, for Arnold was vigilant and extremely cautious. He knew what would be his fate if caught. What would the Americans do with me, if they should catch me? Arnold inquired of a young prisoner. They would cut off and bury with military honors your leg that was wounded at Saratoga. and hang the rest of you, replied the young American soldier. General Phillips join
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canals. (search)
sage of a law by the legislature of Virginia for the construction of works—canals and good wagonroads—by which the Potomac and Ohio rivers might be connected by a chain of commerce. After the Revolution, the States of Virginia and Maryland took measures which resulted in the formation of the famous Potomac Company, to carry out Washington's project. In 1784 Washington revived a project for making a canal through the Dismal Swamp, not only for drainage, but for navigation between the Elizabeth River and Albemarle Sound. The oldest work of the kind in the United States is a canal, begun in 1792, 5 miles in extent, for passing the falls of the Connecticut River at South Hadley. The earliest completed and most important of the great canals of our country is the Erie, connecting the waters of Lake Erie with those of the Hudson River. A committee appointed by Congress during Jefferson's administration reported in favor of this canal, and a survey was directed to be made. Commissione
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Craney Island, operations at (search)
menaced. Norfolk was the first point of attack. For its defence on the waters were the frigate Constellation, thirty-eight guns, and a flotilla of gunboats; on the land were Forts Norfolk and Nelson (one on each side of the Elizabeth The Block-House on Craney Island, 1813. River), and Forts Tar and Barbour, and the fortifications on Craney Island, 5 miles below the city. Towards midnight of June 19 Captain Tarbell, by order of Commodore Cassin, commanding the station, went down the Elizabeth River with fifteen gunboats, to attempt the capture of the frigate Junon, thirty-eight guns, Captain Sanders, which lay about 3 miles from the rest of the British fleet. Fifteen sharp-shooters from Craney Island were added to the crews of the boats. At half-past 3 in the morning the flotilla approached the Junon, and, under cover of the darkness and a thick fog, the American vessels approached her to within easy range without being discovered. She was taken by surprise. After a conflict
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dunmore, John Murray, Earl of, 1732-1809 (search)
s who should join the royal standard, which he had unfurled, and take up arms against the rebels. He declared martial law throughout Virginia, and made Norfolk the rendezvous for a British fleet. He sent marauding parties on the shores of the Elizabeth and James rivers to distress the Whig inhabitants. Being repelled with spirit, he resolved to strike a severe blow that should produce terror. He began to lay waste the country around. The people were aroused and the militia were rapidly gathering for the defence of the inhabitants, when Dunmore, becoming alarmed, constructed batteries at Norfolk, armed the Tories and negroes, and fortified a passage over the Elizabeth River, known as the Great Bridge, a point where he expected the militiamen to march to attack him. Being repulsed in a battle there (Dec. 9, 1775), Dunmore abandoned his intrenchments at Norfolk and repaired to his ships, when, menaced by famine —for the people would not furnish supplies—and annoyed by shots from s
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), French assistance. (search)
rn end of Long Island, pursued the French vessels, and off the Capes of Virginia a sharp naval engagement occurred, in which the latter were beaten and returned to Newport. This failure on the part of the French fleet caused Lafayette to halt in his march at Annapolis, Md. Two of the French vessels, taking advantage of a storm that disabled the blockading squadron, entered Chesapeake Bay (February, 1781). Thus threatened by land and water, Arnold withdrew to Portsmouth, so far up the Elizabeth River as to be out of the reach of the French ships. There he was reinforced by troops under General Phillips, of the Convention troops, who had been exchanged for General Lincoln. The French ships soon returned to Newport, after making some prizes. When, on June 2, 1779, the legislature of Virginia unanimously ratified the treaties of alliance and commerce between France and the United States, and the governor had informed the French minister at Philadelphia of the fact, that functionar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Great Bridge, battle at the. (search)
Great Bridge, battle at the. On the invasion of the Elizabeth River by Lord Dunmore (November, 1775), Colonel Woodford called the militia to arms. Dunmore fortified a passage of the Elizabeth River, on the borders of the Dismal Swamp, where he suspected the militia would attempt to cross. It was known as the Great Bridge. There he cast up intrenchments, at the Norfolk end of the bridge, and amply supplied them with cannon. These were garrisoned by British regulars, Virginia Tories, neElizabeth River, on the borders of the Dismal Swamp, where he suspected the militia would attempt to cross. It was known as the Great Bridge. There he cast up intrenchments, at the Norfolk end of the bridge, and amply supplied them with cannon. These were garrisoned by British regulars, Virginia Tories, negroes, and vagrants, in number about 600. Woodford constructed a small fortification at the opposite end of the bridge. On Saturday morning, Dec. 9, Captains Leslie and Fordyce, sent by Dunmore, attacked the Virginians. After considerable manoelig;uvring and skirmishing, a sharp battle ensued, lasting about twenty-five minutes, when the assailants were repulsed and fled, leaving two spiked field-pieces behind them. The loss of the assailants was fifty-five killed and wounded. Not a Virginia
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Matthews, Edward 1729-1805 (search)
e commanded a brigade of the Guards, with the rank of brigadier-general, in the attack on Fort Washington. In May, 1779, General Clinton sent 2,000 men from New York, under General Matthews, to plunder the coast of Virginia. He entered the Elizabeth River on transports, escorted by a squadron of armed vessels under Sir George Collier, on May 9. They plundered and spread desolation on both sides of the river to Norfolk. They seized that city, then rising from its ashes and enjoying a considerable trade, and also Portsmouth, opposite. These were the chief places of deposit of Virginia agricultural productions, especially tobacco. They captured and burned not less than 130 merchant vessels in the James and Elizabeth rivers, an unfinished Continental frigate on the stocks at Portsmouth, and eight ships-ofwar on the stocks at Gosport, a short distance above Portsmouth, where the Virginians had established a navy-yard. So sudden and powerful was the attack, that very little resista
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Norfolk, destruction of (search)
ed to take no steps that would give needless alarm. Meanwhile, the Virginia Confederates had proposed to seize or destroy all this property. As early as the night of April 16, two light boats of 80 tons each were sunk in the channel of the Elizabeth River, below Norfolk, to prevent the government vessels leaving the stream. The government, alarmed, sent Capt. Hiram Paulding from Washington with instructions for McCauley to lose no time in arming the Merrimac, and in getting the Plymouth anPresident Lincoln and Secretary Stanton visited Fort Monroe and granted Wool's request. Having made personal reconnoissance, he crossed Hampton Roads with a few regiments, landed in the rear of a Confederate force on the Norfolk side of the Elizabeth River, and moved towards the city. General Huger, of South Carolina, was in command there. He had already perceived his peril, with Burnside in his rear and McClellan on his flank, and immediately retreated, turning over Norfolk to the care of M
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