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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 29 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 6 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) or search for Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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writer from this place, to the best of his ability, enlightened your readers concerning the few that remained, and of the progress of the "yellow fever." As our people are threatened with another, and a different kind of havoc. I take pleasure in again writing from near the great depot of the "Federal Government." The sameness of the scenery near the Navy Yard has been much broken within the last two or three days; the old rat-possessed, musty and dusty hulks that have lain in the Elizabeth river since — as long as the writer can recollect — with only one man aboard of each, to keep off the poor and illiterate rascals who coveted a little of the copper cankering upon their sides, have been cleaned and upon them guns have been mounted, ammunition stored away in their holds, and — it should be the "feather that breaks the camel's back"--the guns are brought to bear upon the peaceful farmers of Norfolk county, a portion of the sovereign people of the proud old Commonwealth of Virgi<