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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 29 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 6 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) or search for Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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railroads converging there from all parts of the South enables cotton to be placed there, from the remotest corners of the South, several days sooner than by the water navigation of the Gulf.--Two years would, if Virginia becomes a State of the Southern Confederacy, see Norfolk and the Chesapeake cities enjoying the great bulk of the cotton export trade of the American continent. The export trade would bring, also, the import trade of the South into the same waters, and the immense business now monopolized by New York would be transferred to the banks of the Elizabeth and James. For Virginia to remain a part of the Northern Confederacy, is to remain forever in political provincialism and commercial vassalage. To sever that disparaging and baneful connection, is to assert for herself that political and commercial independence which God and Nature designed as her destiny, and to at once prepare herself for wielding the sceptre of commerce in the wealthiest Confederacy on the globe.