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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 29 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 6 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 8, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) or search for Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Cape Henlopen and hauled their boat seven miles to the next inland water, proceeded south as far as that would carry them, and then disembarked and dragged the yawl five miles further, until they reached the water between the mainland and the islands which skirt the coast of Maryland and the Eastern shore of Virginia. Down this they made their way to Chincoteague inlet, whence they emerged into the Atlantic and finally landed in Lynhaven, where their boat was carried three miles farther and launched into the Eastern branch of the Elizabeth River.--They arrived here on Friday evening, having suffered occasionally for want of provisions and water. Capt. Rue says that the excitement in New York is calming down, and the enlistments were confined to those who had nothing else before them but starvation. He saw a company of men without coats or shoes who were to be sent South, but the men were more anxious to go where they could get something to eat than to fight.--Norfolk Herald.